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All Saints ' Consecrated.

j BY BISHOP SPROTT. All Saints' Church was consecrated* yesterday morning by His Lordship the Bishop of Wellington, Dr. Sprott. The church was filled to the doors. The visiting clergy were the Eev. E. Young, Vicar of Carterton; and Eev. W. Tye, Vicar of Ashhurst. The usual form for the consecration of a church in tbe province of New Zealand was gone through. The -Bishop, attenctecUby his chaplain, was received at fii«west door of the church by and clergy, the churchwarden, and some of the leading Anglican citizens of trie town, a petition, signed by the vicar and the churchwardens, was delivered to the Bishop, praying him to consecrate the church. The Bishop received tHe petition, ordered it to be read, and consecrated the church. The Lord's Prayer followed.

The Bishop then entered the church followed by the clergy, the choir, and the churchwardens, and standing at the west end, blessed it. He then, proceeded to the altar, followed by the procession, and laid the key of the church upon it. A short prayer asking God for his blessing upon Kie church was said by the congreation, and while the people still knelt, the Bishop said a prayer of supplication. He then proceeded with the vicar and churchwardens to the font, the chancery, the lectern, the pulpit, the choir stalls, the sanctuary steps, and the altar, saying versicles and prayers. He then sat in his chair and ordered the sentence of consecration to be read, the people standing. He then signed the document and ordered it to be preserved among the muniments of the diocese.

During the service a beautiful stained window, erected by his relatives to the memory of the late Mr Henry Scott McKellar, was unveiled by the Bishop. THE BISHOP'S ADDRESS. Bishop Sprott, in his sermon, congratulated the parishioners on having built the church and upon the great work they had accomplished in the parish. He congratulated them also on having at last wiped out the debt on the church, in order that it might be consecrated. Some of the parishioners who had assisted in the erection of the church had been scattered far in other lands, and he had no doubt that the late vicar (the Rev. H. G. Rosher), would at that moment be carrying on his own admirable work in the trenches, amid a rain of fire. He had no doubt that if the parishioners who had left the parish knew of the consecration service, their prayers and best wishes would be with the congregation. The church had been opened 2* years ago, and he was glad the parishioners had not sought to have it consecrated before the debt had been wiped out, though the temptation must have been great. The debt had been paid in the face of the fact that many in the parts* had contributed largely to the war funds. That morning a window had been unveiled to the memory of Henry Scott McKellar. It might not be known that Mr McKellar had played a part in the history of the Anglican Church in New Zealand, even greater that the part he had played as a member of the congregation of All Saints' Church. He had been eminently connected with the church in its very early days, being one , of those who had signed the original constitution. He had also been associated with the Melanesian Mission, and it seemed only fitting that a memorial should be placed in the church in recognition of his services. In concluding his sermon, the preacher said that he wished to make reference to the lack of faith which had crept in in the latter half of the nineteenth century. People had been in great danger of losing faith in another life because this earth had seemed a very fat and comfortable place. If there was one thing that was needed, it was that we should get back faith in man's immortality. He felt sure that the congregation did not appreciate the great temptation which beset the young man at the front, the temptation that as they had only about three weeks to live, they should make a good time of it. This temptation came to young men who had no particular faith in a fuhvre life and encouraged them to say, "Eat, drink, and be merry, for to-morrow we die." They reasoned with themselves that in a few days they were to become extinct, and that their final actions did not matter. He had known men who believed that death was the end of everything, who had clung to the last to that which was just and good. On the other hand, if we believed in final extinction, what had we got to say to the men at the front who said, "Eat, drink, and be merry, for to-morrow we die," and what justification could we offer them for their sacrifice! He hoped that the consecration of the church would weld the parishioners together in a bond. of common faith and that it would be strengthened m davs to come. • The evening service was also largely attended, the preacher being Archpeacon Innes-Jones, of Feilding, who took for his subject * The Solution of the Recognition of God in the Sanctuary." The ehoir music was excellent ana was a feature of both services. " The offertories during the day amounted to about £6O.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/MT19161030.2.39

Bibliographic details

All Saints' Consecrated., Manawatu Times, Volume XL, Issue 13537, 30 October 1916

Word Count
898

All Saints' Consecrated. Manawatu Times, Volume XL, Issue 13537, 30 October 1916

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