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HEROIC NURSES.

MEMORIAL SERVICE. At the Opera House last, night, aftei clmrcli hours, a service was held as a memorial for those nurses who have lost then lives in the war. Tliere was a good alien dance of the public, who followed the servie with great, attention throughout tho two c\ cedent addresses delivered during the evening 1 being listened to very attentively. Tlx service was held under the auspices ot tin Manawatu Patriotic Society, the chairman ol which (the Mayor) presided. Opening with the National Anthem, th s. rvico lasted a little over an hour. Tie hymns sung were appropriate to the oc ■ .-asion, and included, "0 Gc-d of Love,' "For .Men at the Front," "Jesu, Lover oi <ny Soul," an ( ] "Abide with Me." Pra\<i: were said by Staff-Captain Greenfield (Sa .aiion Army), followed bv the Lord's Pra\c. by the Rev. 11. M. Smyth, and the lesso:. utrc read by the Rev. Macdonald Asplam i'rom Matthew, chapter 25, and Revelations chapter 7. The Ma\or read an apology fc-i absence l'rprn the Rev. F. W. Hoys, wh stated that? he was very sorry absence from home made it impossible for him to attorn the service held in memory of the bravnurses who have died doing their duty foi 'he Empire. This noble sacrifice, said th- •• l iter, was a call to every young man in tin own to oiler his services to the cause <-■ freedom, which needs the help of ever-able-bodied man. The Rev. 11. G. Blackburne, ill the coursjf his address, said they had lIK -'t togethei for the purpose of commemorating the lov ing sacrifice and devotion to our cause o those nurses 1o the sick and wounded win have lost their lives—those nurses who wen very dear to them, who had died on tin ill-fated ship Marquette. They had also t< draw an inspiration from those lives of wiil ing sacrifice and devotion, and also to think of that heroic woman, Nurse Cavell, who. after a long period of devotion to the sick and wounded, had met her death as a martyr because she- had not, hesitated to risk her life to save her fellow countrymen from ; what she believed would be their death. He | dwelt upon the service women had rendereo ! to the Empire, and to the cause of truth and [justice in this war, and said they were fighting the battles of the Empire as well as am | man. Think of what women havi been doing. and are doing, in this fight. Mothers, sisters, sweethearts, an,) wives, have sent their men to the front bravely and cheerfully to meet the hardships and danger, sickness and wounds, and in many cases' death. We thanked God and admired an ( ] loved them for then sacrifice. He had been much struck with the spirit pervading a letter he had received from one devoted woman whose husband had gone, and who was reported killed. She stated that it was terrible to have lost him, but that it would have been far more terrible if he had not gone. Another woman l who had lost a brother, and had another brother going, and whose husband's name was down to go, I;a,] spoken in almost the same words- —it was sad to lose them, but how much more terrible if they had not gon n , That was the spirit that was winning our cause for «s. And then there was the work wonvn were doing in other ways—doing work often beyond their strength to en able men to go and represent- them at the front. JTe had heard of many cases of this from England, where more of it was taking place than here, because the need was great' r.4 In one instance two sisters who were well off were helping, one by acting as a chauffeur, so as to set a man free, while the other was learning dairying, so that another man could go. That was the spirit, and we had it in this country too, where women were working to set. the men free to go. There was also the great body of women who were working with the needle to provide comforts for those men who had already gone, yiid were going. There were also tiie ladv doctors and the nurses who had gone to the front, an,| nursing was the highest calling for women, showing their qualities of patience, skill, love, and perseverance. They could not speak too highly of the self-sacrifice, love, and devotion of the nurses in their work. In the local hospital. too. he had heard testimony to the loving care of the nurses there. Now they were thinking sadly of those nurses who had lis en called aw ay just as they were setting forth to fulfil those high ideals of work for those at the front. They felt deeply their Jo-s, but also felt that all was well with them as they had been called to a higher sphere. Two of them, Nurses Brown and Jatnieson, had been connected with the hospital in Palmerston. and to their relatives they gave their deepest sympathy. I These women had given men an inspiration, and'he appealed to the young men of this I country who had not yet answered the api peal, to follow the example these nurses have (given, and to go forih and do their duty for the great cause, A woman ha,] remarked to him what a slur it would be, and how pitiful, if they had to have conscription to make the men go. How pitiful if in the years to come children should say their fathers did not. go until they were forced to do so. He appealed to the young men to take an inspiration from the women who have given their lives, for who could hang back when the wonrn said "co.

'I lie Rev, ,J 11. Haslem said that before tiic present dreadful war broke out, one might 11av«■ thought thai there were several classes of people whoso services would bo rocjiiircd iii a groat conflict, but who would oi.joy comparative immunity from danger. They had fondly hoped that civilisation had so far advanced —that it would be the easiest thing in the world for nurses, doctors, and chaplains to perform their duty without com. jng into the danger 7.0110, but rhis war had shown us that there watf danger for anyone who <lid anything in connection with the war. It was borne in 011 us that the duty < f chaplain was no sinecure, for wounds and death had come to many of those who were eager to minister spiritually to those near the front. Personally, ho ha,] a particular interest in the torpedoing of the Marquette, because he knew and respected very highly two of the nurses on board, while a cousin of liis wife's was also on board. They had been amongst those rescued, but none the jess, their sympathies went out to those who had not fared so fortunately. They had met, al-o, to pay a tribute of tespcct to the memory of another brave woman —Nurse Cavell whoso record had become an. imperishable one, who had been done to death by a foe devoid of every instinct of chivalry. Nothing 1 that lady had done justified the infliction of ' the extreme penalty upon her ; the utmost nenaliv should have been banishment from Ik-lgium, or confinement in prison, giving j her the kindest possible treatment, for she i deserved that for her services to the Ger- ' man wounded. She had been tried by a

'secret tribunal, denied the services of an : advocate, denied the consideration the .American Ambassador tried to show her. and ! then taken out anil shot. The whole proceeding was revolting to the moral sense, ; and to all humanity. If such a deed had | been perpetrated under the British flag, they j would all hide their heads with shame. He J thanked God such a think could not. take .. place under the British flag, for if any officer j were 10 try and hurry through such a trial he would meet with short shrift, and well ! he would deserve it. As a. Christian Mini- ' dor there were some things he would rather : not say, but they were in the heart and thoughts. Here they had evidence of the I German policy to strike terror into their I foes, so that they could march on to victory. They had failed in their object, and , all they had succeeded in doing was to make the name of German a bv-word. The murder of the brave lady w as only one of the i several deeds that laid bare the soul of the ; race with whom we found ourselves at : war. He referred to the destruction of ' Lou vain, the torpodooing of the passenger 1 ship Lusitania, the sinking of the hospital steamer Marquette, and said the Germans 1 not only executed these deeds, but gloried in i them. They took a half-holiday to celelirat ■ such occasions, but lie would be sorry if Kngland took a half-holiday to celebrate the sinking of a battleship. Thfcy were pleased at the advance the Allies had made, bul there was a feeling of sadness that such diabolical work had to be done at all. To speak of the degradation of the German race was one of the saddest things of the time, ; and gave him no feeling of gloating over 1 it. Was it any wonder that there were : slow t<i believe the stories of the sacking of Louvain? Before the war it would have i appeared incredible that a civilised nation | would have stooped to such ,a deed. We | would be deserving of defeat if the know--1 ledge of such atrocities did not give a stimulas to recruiting to put such things i down. lie had no doubt of the righteouness of this war, for if wo had failed in our ,treatv obligations to Belgium every rightminded mian would have hung his head iit I shame. Pressure would always be brought; ; to arrange differences between chivalrous i nations without r< sorting to the arbitrament I of the sword, but there was only one way to 1 treat a bully. The spirit, of the nation that ; had provoked this conflict was a standing ; menace lo the world. It was due to our forefathers who had handed us down our 1 heritage, to the brave men and women who ! had suffered in this conflict, to our wives and children, and to thosD who will come after us,

!o keep and pass on those privileges which ,ve ourselves have. enjoyed. If we allowed >ur rights to be wrested from us by a brutal toe,, it would put the clocks back a thousand years, arid the work would all have co be done over again. This was no time for criticism, but for gracious help. "Let us,. as we honour the bravery of those who have lone their duty, see that we are ready for | aerilicc as a token of gratitude for the j i ich heritage of the past," concluded the i pcaker. A co.lcction was taken up in aid of Lord ! Unsdowne's appeal for funds for the Red Jross, and the service closed with the Pronouncement of the Benediction by the Rev. Macdonald Aslpand.

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Bibliographic details

HEROIC NURSES., Manawatu Standard, Volume XLI, Issue 10234, 22 November 1915

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HEROIC NURSES. Manawatu Standard, Volume XLI, Issue 10234, 22 November 1915

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