Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

ALL SAINTS' NEW CHURCH.

STRUCTURE APPROACHING COMPLETION. A SPLENDID EDIFICE. i lMt L after , ■ onie y e *»' work-very hard work on the part of some-the Anglican Church people of Palmeraton North have built their new All Saints' Church, and very proud of it they are. The move! ment to build a new church was started by Archdeacon Harper some nine years a ?Vn- d Mr R do J - c,erc . FR.1.8.A., ot Wellington, was appointed architect, and commissioned to design a building to scat one thousand people, this number being considered the maximum number convenient to have in one congregation. Mr Uere designed a building of brick, with stone facings and lintels, a clerestory and central tower of French design. It was 1 considered, however, that this design would be too costly, and so, some throe years after the initiation of the scheme, the design, as carried out, was substituted. THE DESIGN. This church is by far the largest brick church in the diocese of Wellington, acIcommodating in the main building 940 peoplo, and in the chapel 60. The plan is not unusual, but is designed to give the most accommodation for the cost. It consists of a nave and chancol of tho same width throughout, 34 feet, with north and south aisles to the nave, each 16 feet wide The organ chamber is on the south side of the chancel, and the vestri«-a lie beyond that again, while on the north side of tho chancel lies the chapel. This chapel, it is certain, will prove of tho greatest benefit to the church, as it can be used for small services, communion ■ and week night services. It will be found far more cosy for these services than tho big building, and will bo a complete church in itself. It is peached by tho north porch, and is sonar ated from the main building by three arches, the lower parts of which will lie filled in with upright panelling to the height of the people's heads, and then finished with black iron railing with gilded points.

THE BAPTISTRY AND TOWER. -

. At the west, or street end of the buildnig, are the two porches and baptistrv. lhe north-west porch is that under the tower, which is a striking feature of the «e«gn, rising with its eight pinnacles to a height of ninety-five feet. This tower is divided into four floors, and running up the inside there is a staircase, bv which visitors may gain the roof. From this point there is a most glorious view of the whole of the town and tho surrounding country. The upper portion of tho tower may be seen from almost every part of the town. The floors to the tower are all formed of. concrete, reinforced with rods, and provision has boon made for the fixing of a poal of bells in tho louvre chamber.

Between the tower and the south-west porch there lies tho baptistry with swing doors between it and tho porches, and three arches leading into the nave of the church, so that the font is fully visible from the church. The font is of Oamaru stone, with turned marhlo pillars, and stands on a polished marble slab with two concrete steps beneath. This polished marble slab was laid as a memorial stone on November 7th last year. The window in the baptistry immediately behind tho font is that window which was placed in the old church in memory to Archdeacon Harper's child, who died at sea whilethe parents were journeying to England. INSIDE THE CHURCH. The interior is exceedingly pleasing, the whole being very cosy and warm looking. The walls arc the plain brickwork, neatly pointed with grey joints, with splayed brick moulds to tho heads and Bills* of windows, and other openings The woodwork is oiled only, all the heavy framing and posts being of beautiful jarrah, while tho lining is heart of red pine, darkened in the oiling process. The nave and chancel roofs are on tho hammerl>eam principle, with five bays in the nave with an arcade on each side.

Thore are largo fivclight windows with tracoried heads at the east and west ends, all filled in with leaded cathedral glass, the whole Iwing very handsome. The north and south ligTits in tho nave and chapel are square headed, each divided into six lights. These windows are fitted with what are known as hoppers, iron frames hinged to open inwards, so that they can Ikj secured at any angle, and deflect tho current of air upward uad over the heads cf the congregation.

The main floors are of wood, while the aisles throughout are laid with decolitc, a quiet, hard substance laid like cement, with a warm pleasing surface exactly like red cork linoleum. Though tho interior is simple it is dignified, and the spacious width of the chancel is not only impressive, but is most practical. There is no brick arch with its heavy supports to check the view of the altar. The distance between tho choir seats allows a double row of communicants to approach the communion rail, while there is a passage between tho choir seats for communicants leaving the rail to return to their seats. EXTERIOR BRICKWORK.

Tho analysis of tho exterior is very interesting. It shows what, can \m> done, n«>t without a good deal of thought, however. with bricks. It will be noticed that in the construction of the whole of the building not another material than brickwork has been used for the walls. Mr Clero has relied solely on the use of the chamfered bricks for his mouldings and ornamentation, and tho result is eminently satisfactory. It will be seen that in place of cement slabs the tops of buttresses have bom finished with moulded bricks, tho window sills aro of chamfered bricks, set one above the other and receding from the projecting courses to the wooden window frames. Tho walls are constructed on the hollow wall principle, with 21-inch space between the outer and inner shells, tied to each other by iron ties, and tho whole of the visible work inside and out is pressed brickwork. Even tho pinnacles of the tower have been formed of bricks, each course lwing set in slightly from the course just below it, till it comes to tho top, where they are finished sjith sheet copper immediately below the finials and crosses. The main roofs of the church are coven d with Major's double Roman roofing tiles, which have a dense and impervious body, and also a beautiful and highly-finished eurface. They are not so porous m other tiles that have been used here, and it is hoped that this will lesson the discolouration that seems to take place on tiled roof.-*. The roofs of the tower, baptistry, and vesteries are laid with reinforced concrete and finished outside with Neuchatel asphalt, and on the under side with white plaster. The ioors of tho porches are all laid with Sin x Bin red tiles on concrete beds, the stops being similar with nosings of Arkilitc. LIGHTING. Tho whole of the church is lightod with gaa, incandescent, tiie fittings being of black iron with brass balls. Those of the nave. aisles, chapel, and chanool consist of three brackets each with two inverted burners and each supported from tho pillar above by brass chains. The rest of tho lights hang from the ceilings. The two vestries are splendid rooms with plenty of lights and very roomy, provided with cupboards, and other necessary r.ppointments. They both open from a small porch at the back of the church, while the choir vestry has a door leading to tho bat!; of the organ chamber, and the clergy vestry has a door from the side of the chancel. THE SANCTUARY. Features or the Sanctuary are the scailia or seats which are recesi<od in the wall of tho south side, finished over with arch-s and hood moulds. Slightly nearer the altar thero is the piscina, also recessed with ar-h and mould over. The whole of tho floor and steps in the sanctuary arc laid with Dcoohte. OTHER DETAILS. A feature of the tower which is somewhat now to New Zealand is the flag stave in t!« centre. It i«. most generally in the Old Country where it i* used to fly the flag of tho patron saint of the church, St. George. Tho architect, and his son. Mr Herbert Clero, who has supervised the work from his Palmerston office, arc delighted wish the building, and consider that tho great -<t credit i 6 due to the clerk of works. Mr E. Dvuiock. who lias carried out his duties :c well. Also, there is high praise- due to Mr Myer, of Welliangton, and his son. Mr Henrv Myer, who has carried out the work, for the splendid workmanship put into the building. It is a splendid piece of work, and Palmerston North should be nroud Jo possess such a building. It has filled tip a gap in that corner of the Square which for some time was a waste piece of ground, and turned the site into a tiling of beauty THE DATE OF OPENING. The first services in the church will take

place on Wednesday, Mav 6. In the mom mg, at. 11 o'clock will take place the office for the consecration of the altars and font, with an address by Bishop Sprott. of \V< !- lington, who will conduct tiie service. This will be followed at 12 o'clock by the celebration of tlio Holy Communion. Owing to a rule of the diocoe. that no church can be consecrated unless entirely free of debt., and as there will still bo a small sum owing on the church then, i\w consecration of the church itself will not take place until November 1. All Saints' Day. In the evening of May 6. at 7.30 o'clock, a choral evensong will take place, when tiio Bishop will again preach.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/MS19140403.2.42

Bibliographic details

ALL SAINTS' NEW CHURCH., Manawatu Standard, Volume XLI, Issue 9766, 3 April 1914

Word Count
1,660

ALL SAINTS' NEW CHURCH. Manawatu Standard, Volume XLI, Issue 9766, 3 April 1914

Working