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ALL SAINTS' CHURCH.

LAYING THE FOUNDATION STONE

CEREMONY SPOILT BY RAIN

Wretched- weather conditions completely spoilt the ceremony of laying the foundation stono of the new brick church, which tho Anglicans of Palmerston are erecting oo street.

Undeterred by the iftormy conditions a goodly crowd assembled, and the spectacle presented was uniquo in the history of the town. The dull red walls of the unfinished sanctuary were a background aigainst which was grouped a curioue combination of white surplice* and black umbrellas, for the only roof overhead woe the leaden sky, which persisted in dropping an occasional shower on the unprotected heads of the congregation. An occasional touch of colour was added by the brighter millinery of the ladies, the scarlet hatbands of the Craven school girls being prominent. In the unavoidable absence of his Excellency the Governor, Bishop Sprott, of Wellington, performed the ceremony, and Rev. H. G. Rosher, vicar of All Saint*', conducted the service customary on such an occasion.

His Lordship, in laying the foundation stone, referred to the regret which was felt by the unavoidable absenco of his Excellency, lie also stated that he had received a letter from Ven Archdeacon Harper'expressing his regret at being unable to be present. Bishop Sprott eaid ho was laying the memorial stono of what would, ho lioped, be a church which would stand from generation to generation. No doubt some of the older inhabitants of Palrnerston North would regret that the old church was being supplanted by another; he quite understood how the building had becomo.endeared to the older inhabitants of the parish. It had been associated with their joys and sorrows and hallowed with th&r prayers and supplications. But it was felt that, the time had come when finer churches should be erected; places that would stand for generations. Grand associations had sprung up around the old churches of tho Mother Country. There was a charm about thorn and they were a delight to visit. It was felt that'churches should be erected in New Zealand which would make tho same appeal to the people. This church, said the Bishop, stood for I one thing; all churches stood for the tame thing. It stood there as the home of homes I for men. Amongst all the superficial differences which separated man from man and sometimes class from class - there were several things that bound them to gcther. One was man's common origin as the children of one Father in heaven. Another thing shared in common was destiny, and the third the pleasure of working hand in hand to establish God's Kingdom on earth. All three were the only possible foundations of Christian society. The Bishop concluded by praying that God would grant that this church might be a witness to those great truths; that, man might find a common home; that they might gather here around the feet of a common Father; and that) they might bo fellow workers with Christ.. «™ ftor sin?in ff fc k* well-known hyrtin, Tho Church's One Foundation," during which offertories were placed on the foundation stone, the ceremony conoluded with an appropriate Benediction.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/MS19131107.2.15

Bibliographic details

ALL SAINTS' CHURCH., Manawatu Standard, Volume XLI, Issue 9643, 7 November 1913

Word Count
519

ALL SAINTS' CHURCH. Manawatu Standard, Volume XLI, Issue 9643, 7 November 1913

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