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Manawatu Evening Standard. Circulation, 3,500 Copies Daily FRIDAY, MAY 8, 1908. THE CULTURE OF FLOWERS.

I Theke are few people who do not enjoy and value a garden; in the words of Bacon, " one of the noblest and purest of the joys of man." Many Palmerstonians take pleasure in the cultivation of flowers as the private gardens now bear witness. But it is a singulajr thing that four or five attempts to organise the flowergrowers have always ended in failure. A correspondent yesterday urged in our columns that another effort should be ma3e to form a Society having for its object the encouragement of floriculture. We understand the Mayor is willing to call a public meeting to discuss the proposition. A subject for debate at that meeting might be the reasons why previous societies in Palmerston have succumbed. From what can be gathered it is the heavy expense rate that has proved fatal in the past. Flower shows cannot be made self-supporting. Economy is therefore an essential factor for success. A scheme must be devised whereby the expenses will be cut down. Valuable prizes are out of the question. Flowers must be'grown and shown purely for themselves, and we are not without hope that there are enough enthusiasts in Palmerston to make a creditable show on these lines. Then the question of a suitable hall arises, and in this connection it is worth considering whether the lecture hall at the Showgrounds could not b© used for the purpose. It might be obtained very reasonably from the A. and P. Association, and thus a great economy would be effected, for rent is one of the heaviest items in the balance-sheets of horticultural societies. An assured income ought also to be possible by fixing the subscription at a small sum, and obtaining a large number of members. These are points that must be dealt with before any definite decision is. come to. If satisfactory arrangements are made to enable the operations of a horticultural society to be carried on at the minimum expense there is no reason why it should not be established on a firm basis, and a great impetus would thus be given to the culture of flowers.

THE FOXTON HARBOUR BOARD.

Somk time ago—last November,. to be j exact—the Foxton Chamber of Commorce wrote to the Palmerston Chamber asking for their co-operation in taking initiative steps towards the formation of a Harbour Board at Foxton. Tho secretary of tho Ptdmerston Chamber wrote that although no meeting would be held until after the holidays, he felt certain his Chamber would co-operate. The matter was discussed at the first meeting after the holidays, and a resolution ' passed that a letter be written to Foxton stating that the Palmerson Chamber would meet representatives from Foxton any day in the week except Thursday, and asking them to fix a date for the meeting, so that necessary arrangements tould be made. The letter was duly sent, but up to the present no reply has been received, and the Foxton Chamber seems to have taken the whole of tho responsibility on its own shoulders, as it is moving in the matter by itself. Now Palmerston is vitally interested in the proposed Harbour Board. This district is to be included in tho Board's sphere, and as there is the important question of representation to be decided, it is about time that the matter was enquired into by the Palmerston Chamber. Wo do not say that there are serious objections to be raised, but I any matter that concerns the welfare of this district should have the fullest consideration, and it would be well for delegates from both Chambers to meet and discuss the subject. A Bill to establish the Harbour Board has been drafted, and as it will bo submitted to Parliament shortly, further delay in dealing with the matter locally is inadvisable.

Steam which would generate 150 horsepower is blowing off daily in waste at the refuse destructors in Wellington. Ihe power could bo best used ior lighting or tramway purposes,'and tho matter of bringing it into practical use is being made the subject of a joint report from the Tramway Engineer and the City Engineer.

Mr J. Q, Williamson's "Scarlet Pimpernel" Company, the leading artistes in which ~are Mr Julius Knight and Miss Ola Humphrey, will appear at the Opera House on May 18th and 19th. The pieces to bo staged are "The Scarlet Pimpernel and "A Royal Divorce." The arrangements for the company's appearance in Palmerston were made to-day by Mr W T alter Monk, touring manager.

Referring to the recent illness of the Premier, the Wairarapa Daily Times says: —It is no wonder that Sir Joseph Ward has half killed himself with his recent trips. New Zealand does not expect the worif Ot ten men from its Premier, ana would tninK all £i- ,0 morc °£ Sir Joseph if he did not d#«-e 90 much of his energy to a circus busiiifc's&r, which,, when all is said and done, is a iotiU $t electioneering.

A man has just died in hospital at Chicago from a broken neck, caused through having a tooth extracted. The tooth was an obstinate one. and the dentist, in trying to get a better grip, forced the unhappy patient's head until he fractured tho spinal column. The dentist, horror-stricken at what he had done, hurried the man to the hospital, but from the first the easo was hopeless.

During the fire and drought period it was generally considered, owing to the shortage of grass, that the whole of the butter and cheese concerns in the Eketahuna district would be.compelled to suspend operations fully six weeks earlier than usual. As a result of the exceptionally favourable weather experienced since that period, however, the flow of milk has been maintained better than was anticipated, and from indications the closing down dates, in the case of cheese factories, will not be three weeks earlier than last season. —Express.

Although J;here are indications of a plentiful supply of grass for the winter in tho Eketahuna district, there will be a scarcity of rough fodder, which was practically all swept by the recent fires, and consequently cattle will suffer to some -extent. A Rongokokako settler, when speaking to an Express reporter on the subject, stated hia intention of providing a substitute for his cows by chopping down the green scrub on hia property. In the absence of anything better, said the settler, cattle relish and thrive on this kind of food.

It has been the custom for some years past for the Mayor of Now Plymouth upon installation, to enterain the councillors at a little luncheon in the Mayor's room,, filling the "flowing bowl" with good wishes and good liquors. Mr Tisch, however, has decided to institute a new order of things. If any councillor on Wednesday expected to quaff the sparkling champagne he was disappointed. The new Mayor informed the Council that he had decided to depart from the old custom, which to him had a touch of selfishness about it, and in place of the usual function he would give a picnic, to be called "tho Mayor's picnic," to the councillors and borough staffs, with their wives, families and sweethearts. —News.

A party of Feilding sportsmen comprising several guns who went up the Main Trunk line after pigeons came back to town disgusted with the result of their expedition. There, wore plenty of pigeons in sight—thousands of them— but they were up at the top of the trees, after the late-ripening berries, and could not be got at. Those that fell to the gun.s were, to quote the shootisrs, "as thin as a rake." It is expected they will be in good condition in about six weeks. A man from up the line came to Feilding this week to buy a good gun and ;i stock of ammunition. He thinks the prospect for pigeon is so good this season that he intends knocking off work to devote himself to bagging pigeons for the Foilding and other markets,. "It. will pay me well." said he. A local man who was out Huntarville way the other day reports that pheasants are very plentiful in that region.— Star.

The shooting season opened with the capture of a veritable monarch of the Wyndham Valle-y bush. A party of nino, knowing , that the- wild boar which had recently so severely mauled Mr John McLaren was again in the- vicinity of McLaren Bros.' farm, went- out on Friday rooming, and wore successful in ■ capturing the brute, at about 9 -a.m. When espied, he had just, gorged himself off a dead sheep's carcase, and was not fit for much fight. The great size of this "Captain Cooker" can be understood by the following dimensions of his carcase, carefully taken: —Length from snout .to rail, 7 feet- 3 inches; girth round tho chest, 5 feet 2 inches; height, 3 feet 2 inches; width of feet, 3g inches; thickness of skin, 2 inches. The boar was endowed with a magnificent, pair of tusks, which make a complete circle of 16 inches. It was Mr Knapp's rifle that bowled him over, but by unanimous consent, the tusks are to be handed to Mr John McLaren, who, no doubt, will treasure them as mementos of a hunting incident from which he v;\s indeed a lucky man to escape with his life. For Bronchial Coughs take Woods' Great- Peppermint Cure. Is 6d and 2s 6d.—Advfc Splendid Value at Payne's in boots and shoes for the holidays.—Advt. Hockey Sticks from is to cOs. Footballs, all sizes and prices. Newest publications. New Post Cards. Wm. Park's Warehouse. —Advt. • New puttings jußt arrived. Sao suits, hand-made, £4 ISs to £5 10s, pt Uemer'i, the leading tailor-, Main Street West.— Adrt.

I The Premier has accepted an invitation to deliver an address in Feilding but is unable to fix a date at present. Tho Technical School Hockey Club has decided to make a trip to Wellington to play the City Technical School on Juno 3rd. • A claim for £12 has been made against the Feilding Borough Council, damages sustained by a horse that fell over a projecting manhole in Manchester Street. Numerous drapers and tailors in Feeding hare been cited to appear at the Arbitration Court which sits in Palmerston next month with reference to the tailors' dispute. The Foilding Star -states that the Telegraph Department has prepared plans for the removal of the Feilding telephone exchange to the top storey of the Post Office building. As the date of the College Street School Bazaar has boon altered from the 13th to the 20th of this month, it has been decided to extend tho time fof closing tho entries for competition from the 11th to the 18th. While a man named John Casey was driving a three-horse team along a road about 13 miles from Waipawa the horses took fright and capsized the vehicle over a cliff, falling about 70ft. Casey was afterwards conveyed to the Waipukurau Hospital. At the Manawatu Land Drainage Board meeting yesterday it was decided to make the general rate foe the ensuing year as follows:—On lands in class 1, Id; class 2, Id; class 3, |d. This is an increase* over last year of about 5U per cent. During the coming year it is proposed to spend £1200 on the Mangaone,

£300 on the Taonui stream, and £300 on the Kairanea-Bunnythorpe road drain. It is expected that the completion -of this latter work will remove the grievances of the settlers on Hughes' Line. A sheep-farmer in the Feilding district, who is also a married man with a family, has written to a Masterton labour agent in search of a position, as manager of a farm or station. Ho- has been farming in the district for some time past, but, as is the case with a good many other farmers, the past bad season crippled his businoss, and he had to give up his farm. Probably, said the agent to the Wairarapa Daily Times reporter, the farmer in question bought his land at the usual high figure recently ruling, and the bad season, coming directly on top, "flattened him out," and the inevitable happened. Nature's harshness, which lays waste the fruitful plantations of tho South Sea Islands occasionally, is nothing compared to her lavish kindness generally. A gentleman who knows tho Islands well says the recent hurricane at Suva will not disorganise the Island fruit trade to the extent generally calculated. The recuperative po'wea- of the sun-bright iales 3* prodigious. A few months after a devastating hurricane the signs of ruin are hidden by gladdening frui.tfulnces. In the Islands, it would seem, one has but. to plant a tree, sleep a while, dream, and wake, and lo! the ripened {nut awaits the gatherer. The following" information is interesting:—Tho present fard trtiiij. Aiieliland to Wellington by the Main Trunk route is £2 14s 6d first-class and £1 17s 2d second-class. This includes the coaoh journey between Makatote and Ohakune, ti distance of. nine miles. Auckland peopfo intending to visit Wellington can . leave any day, stopping the first night at [ Taumarimui, the vsccond night at Taihape, and arriving in Wellington on the third. Tho Auckland to Wellington , journey, via the Central Railway and" Wanganui River, has been reduced to--35a. The. reduction has been rendered ' possible by the increased accommodation available on the new steamer which has been put on the Upper Wanganui. This reduced fare is available from North to South only. The first games for the Euchre Shield between the various lodges in Palmerston N. were played in the Oddfellows' , Hall last night, the contesting teams being H.A.C.B.S. v. Orient Lodge and tho Loyal Manawatu v. A.O.F. The games were keenly contested and the Orient, brethren were successful in defeating the H.A.C.B.S. by 4 points, the scores being 47 games to 43. In the other match Loyal Manawatu won by 8 points, the scores being 64 games to 56. At the conclusion of the games the visiting teams were entertained by the Loyal Manawatu Lodge, Bros. Pickering (Orient), McLean (H.A.C.8.5.), and Beattie (A.0.F.) returning thanks on behalf of the visitors. The next match will take place in the H.A.C.B.S. Hall on June 4th, when the H.A.C.B.S. will meet Oroua and Court Manawatu Orient, Loyal Manawatu having a bye. The visiting teams will be entertained by the members of the H.A.C.B.S.

The ordinary meeting of the College Street School Committee was held last night. There were present—Messrs Hodder (chairman), Whitehead, Stubba, Stevens, Tyer, Carville, Rutherfurd, Gerrand'and Jewell. A letter was received from the Borough Council stating in' reply to a request from the committee that the work of tarring and sanding the footway from the school to Alexandra Street will be undertaken as soon as tho sower connections are laid. The hope was expressed by the committee that the residents concerned would soon have the connections carried out- so that the path which gets in a very bad state duringwet. weather could be tarred and sanded. The headmaster, Mr Low, reported that the roll number was 437 and the average attendance 370. Messrs Tyer and Stubbs were re-appointed a visiting committee, and the chairman and secretary were authorised to expend up to £5 in metalling the school grounds.

Mr Ziman, the Rhodes scholar, was entertained by the Jewish community in Wellington on Wednesday night. Some interesting speeches were.made at the gathering. The Rev. Van Staveren, thu Jewish Rabbi, referring to Mr Ziman's parentage, remarked that it had been said that it only took two gene-rations for people who came- from Russia or Eastern Europe to lose their customs and idiosyncrasies, but Mr Ziman was I the living lie to such an utterance. Mr 'M. Myers followed his congratulatory remarks with a reference to the advantages of living in a British community. They had seen in Mr Ziman what could be done in a generation by persons coming to a British colony, strangers, and almost friendless, and "the moral of it was that as they had come to the British dominions they should appreciate .the advantages to be derived from citizenship, and "play the game." (Applause.) They should be loyal, not only to. their race and religion, but to their foster country and to the flag which protected them. (Renewed applause.) Mr Ziman, in replying, met with a highly enthusiastic reception. He appropriately thanked the speakers for their personal references. His father and mother could not secure the educational advantages enjoyed, by those who were born in the British, - dominions, but they took care that their eon should have the proper opportunities offered in New Zealand. When he was younger there were times when he felt sorry for being a Jew. but he had got over that and had found that so long as a. man was proud of being a Jew. the rest of tho people were proud of him. He took pride in being a Jew-ish-Englishman. Special Window Display of Ladies* Woven Underwear and Motor Scarves —now so much worn—at The Bon Marcbe to-day, in attractive styles and prices. Inspection of these goods is invited. —Advt. "Diabolo."—This new and fasolnating game is lust opened up at Wm. Park'fc Prices Is 6d to 12s-—Advt. Star lamps 2s 6d eacm Table lamps, with iron stands, 2s lid each at "Barry's" Cheapside, the premier place for all lampware.—Advt. , Send tne documents ot your importations to Messrs J. J. Curtia and Co., Ltd., Lustom-house, Shipping and Forwarding Agents, Custom-house Qua?. Wellington, who will quickly clear, pass) and forward the goods to you. Moderate charges. — Advt.

On page 2: Gables. On page 3: 'Commercial, cables. On page 6: Foothall notes by "Spectator." On page 7: Weekly letter by Frank Morton. Tho Palmerstoii Fire Board meets on Wednesday next. - It is understood that, another -meeting •of the Palmerston Swimming Bath Committee will be held shortly. Mr Balsillie, of Kuiranga, goes through to Takupau next week, where lie is to act as one of the judges of a ploughing match that is being held there •on Wednesday, May 13th. Messrs Hosking Bros., proprietors of the well-known foundry in Street .East, one of the oldest established businesses in Palmerston, have disposed of it to Messrs Niven and" Scott, of Napiwr. It is stated it is tho intention of the new firm to convert the present big shop into a showroom, and to greatly increase the size and capacity -of the plant. The medals\ that have been received by Mr Mellsop in connection with forthicoming golf competitions, are most do.sirable trophies, the challenge medal in • particular being a massive affair. It is ■especially interesting, in view of the fact that it bears the date originally fixed for tho King's Coronation in 1902, but which, as will be generally remembered, was postponed owing to the King s serious illness. The medals, which are alluded to on another page of this issue, will be on view for a few days at Messrs O'Connor and Tydcinnn's, the Square.

Many requests have been made to Mr C. Voss to become a candidate for the vacant seat on the Borough Council, but ho informs us that owing to the public position he at present holds, he will be unable to devote the time that would be necessary if he were elected as councillor. He will, therefore, not stand, "but hopes to come forward on some future occasion. Mr Voss feels grateful to the electors who had expressed their intention of supporting his candidature.

The Government has announced to the trustees of the late Rev. J. C. Andrews, of lea Estate, its intention to acquire the property for settlement purposes, lea is situated in the Temii district, about twenty miles from Mastorton. It will probably absorb between thirty and forty families. It is understood that the Government intends also to acquire a 2900 acre block of land for settlement purposes situated in Hunterville district, leased at present by Dr. Anson, of Weliineton.

The King created a new precedent by paying a visit to Sir Henry CampbellBannerman during his illness. No Sovereign has ever before entered No. 10. Downing Street since it became the official residence of the First Lord of the Treasury. It is also stated that on no previous occasion lias the King left. Britain without being awaited upon wrsonally before his departure by his Prime Minister. On this occasion the Iving was going to Biarritz, and he reversed the usual order of things by visitjng his Prime Minister.

Last night Detective Quirko arrested ;a man named Edward Myers in the act -of going through a chest in a ladys bedroom in the Commercial Hotel, tic was brought before the Court this morn;in" and charged with being a rogue and ■a vagabond. A remand was asked for ;bv Sergeant Stagpoole, to enable- the 'police to take accused's finger prints, it Jbeiii" thought that he might have something to do with the recent housebrcakimr in Palmerston North. A remand was granted, and accused was given bail, himself £100, and two sureties of ±.51! .each.

Second term of the Palmerstott Worth Technical School will commence <on the 18th inst. Full particulars of the (established classes will bo found in our advertising columns. It is proposed to hold new classes in photography. Maori, sinking, woodwork, iirst aid, and nursing. Day classes will bo formed if necessary. Intending students are requested to enrol as early as possible, and the director mav be" consulted from 2 to 3 p.m.. and froin 7 to 8 p.m. daily at the Cuba : Street rooms of the School.

Both Christchurch papers—the Lytteltf:on Times and Press—have suffered se•.ver.t losses during the past twelve .j-jioirtitas. the former through the death of Mr WJlkin (managing director) and the Matter :by the demise of Mr G. G. Stead ■ (chairman of directors). Each gentleman took a prominent part, m the buildin»- up of the properties with which they were identified, and their demise has created a blank in the commercial Lite of the 'Cathedral City which is widely regretted.

With reference to a paragraph recently published in the "Standard, stating that .canvassers wero requesting ladies to insure their husbands and children for weekly, and asking three months' premiums in advance, it is stated that there are some five or six canvassers representing themselves as Industrial agents of the A.M.P. and Government Life. Tho Government Life has no Industrial department, and tne A M.P- district representative assures us that, the agents in question do not represent their Society. The A.M.P. Society has but two agents-Messrs Manttan and Tustin—doing business for the company in Palmerston,

'Speaking at the Mayoral installation at Dunedin, the retiring. Mayor (Mr London) expressed the opinion that the law compelling the whole ot the councillors to vacate office at once was totally wrong. Councillors really occupy the position of a board ot directors, and it seemed altogether unreasonable that there should not be a certain continuity of ofhee. It might happen, owing to a wave ot public feelinc that the whole of the councillors" might be turned out at one time with disastrous results to the city affairs. He would like to see councillors elected for three years, and a percentage retire each year. He •was also of opinion that municipal accounts had not advanced in proportion to trading undertakings by different corporations, and considerable improvements might be effected. He felt certain that if Parliament were approached legislature covering both points he had raised could be easily obtained.

At the anti-gambling open-air meethv held at noon at the Queen s Statue, Wellington, on Tuesday, things were lively for quite a while. One'man got up and offered to give £10 to any charitable institution it the Rev. Mr North could prove certain statements he had .made m a letter to the City Council. Then a lumper mounted the lorry to defend Mr North. ''They .all knew Mr "North." said he, "but this man is a Hereupon the man so ■slifijitingly referred to pulled out his card case" and offered the lumper his card. With a melodramatic wave of the arm the lumper cried: " Keep your card. That proves nothing. The bigo-est scoundrels nowadays carry their card-case." The laughter that followed this was so loud and prolonged that Mr North decided to desist" from his efforts to address the crowd, and with a '•' See you to-mor-row." he descended from the lorry and retired. Do not try to endure that Tjnrvp-rnck-ing- coucrb. " Zyniole Trokoys will, stop it.'"and remove flic irritation. Thov dis-I)i-1 hoarseness and strengthen' the throat. —Advt. For Children's Hacking Cough at night Woods' Great Peppermint Cure 13 6d and 2s 6d.—Advt. Woods' Great Peppermint Cure for v Coughs and Colda never fails. la '6d and 8* 6d.—Advt.

Gapt. Rodgcrs of the New Zealand Defence Staff arrived in Palmcrston to-

day, and will examine Lieutenant, Allen i>l the practical portion of his examination at the- Drill Hall to-night. There is practically no change, in the butter market at present. The best Taranaki factories are quoting at. lljd per lb in bulk, while some of the smaller factories are quoting as low as lid. The market, will probably remain fairly steady during the- winter months. The old-established business of J. A. Nash and Co., Ltd., was taken over to-

day by Mr J. H. Gilchrist. The new owner will conduct the business on the most up-to-date linos and on a largo scale, lie intends to import direct and to sell for cash only at the very lowest possible figure and will, no doubt, bo accorded a generous measure of support.

A meeting ot members of the Manawntu Rifle Association was held in Mounsoy's rooms last evening to discuss the question of entering a team for the Daily Mail Cup competition. This it was decided to do, and the match is to be fired on May 23rd, commencing at noon. It is not known yet how many will be competing, but four targets are to bo prepared. The arrangement of { details was left in the hands of C'ai)tiun Mounsey.

The excellent attendance at the social hold in connection with the Druids' Lodge last evening amply demonstrated the popularity of the series which are being carried out this winter. There were about ninety couples present and dancing was continued till midnight. Bros. G. White and Lyall acted as M'.C. and Mr P. C. Hanley supplied the music. Vocal items were contributed by .Miss Pyeroft. and Mr Bowater. A "long night" is to be held on the 27th hist.

The Wellington Chamber of Commerce complained some time ago that the telephone communication between this city and Palmerston North was not. good. Replying to a letter from the Chamber the secretary of the Poet Office says there had been some interference by induction from telegraph wires, but tho Department itself had not at any time experienced difficulty in getting telephone niγ-smuges through and receiving replies. No complaints had been received from the public, who used the line largely. Interruptions had occurred on March 2nd and April 6th, and the Department surmised that it may have been on these dates that the inconvenience complained of bv the Chamber had been experienced. —N."Z. Times.

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Bibliographic details

Manawatu Evening Standard. Circulation, 3,500 Copies Daily FRIDAY, MAY 8, 1908. THE CULTURE OF FLOWERS., Manawatu Standard, Volume XLI, Issue 8576, 8 May 1908

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Manawatu Evening Standard. Circulation, 3,500 Copies Daily FRIDAY, MAY 8, 1908. THE CULTURE OF FLOWERS. Manawatu Standard, Volume XLI, Issue 8576, 8 May 1908

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