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SPORTING.

O.- Ci KItAIXT.j

I ii.'svo tu acknowledge receipt of c:. , !up!iin:-Hi'i'.-rv tickets for the Palriivtua meeting, commencing to-niar-row. It would bo interesting to learn which impression. predominated with A. Olliver, shock —the course was ;!.;>:ie too !'o;l —or surprise, at his sudden and unexpected descent, when Eraukland put his head down on Tuesday just, before the start of the Electric Handicap at Foxton and "Ured :! the lightweight, who. however, suffered no ill-eft'ects from Lis sudden meeting with Mother Earth. Chattel, the three-year-old daughter of Addington and Lady Spec,- appears a most wayward young lady. Prior to the start of the Electric Handicap at Foxton, she got away from Ikt attendant and careered about among the trees at the side of the course till secured, while on the second day she bolted while being given a preliiuhnry, remaining, on. the course -1 ill idle came to the scene of her previous day's escapade, when she again sought seclusion amongst the trees, taking her rider wi th her. YVI len brought back to the post, .she ran straight enough in her races.

Maicii, winner of the; r»iairliti Hurdles at Foxton, is a counterpart of her full si.stev, Midia, but- does not impress one quite so favourably .'is Ikm: elder sister did. Maidi fenced ' very \veii, and it is more than probi able she will be better than she looks. I She is an inmate of A. Attwood's stable at Feilding, and is consequently in a jituipi.'.g atmosphere, having Ivillarney and Capulet as stable-mates. M'ontigo, by bis dual win at the Foxton meeting, where he captured tile ]>ritici|>;t 1 event- each day, showed that his enforced spell after the Feilding meeting in November had not cost him Ins form. The Strowa.i gelding was only put hi active work again after the Christmas week holidays, and consequently V/. G. Moore, his mentor, had not too much time in which to get his -charge lit again. Included in the Held of maidens that contested the Trial race at the Foxton meeting was IJelario, by The Officer —Sprite, and therefore halfbrother to the oQO-guinea Soult — Sprite yearling sold at Auckland a couple of weeks ago. lielario is a bright boy and a nice cut of a horse, but performed most indifferently in each of his essays at the meeting. It is understood an offer of £ioo war, received for him after he won a. race at the "Vvaikanae meeting on New Year's Day. Included also among the starters in this race were, a half-brother to Bourrasque. v. - ho won by a. bare margin from Lingerer, a half-brother to Shrapnel. Irish Utile, and a. halfbrother to tiie defunct but well-re-membered mare Cyuisca. Generally, the quality of the contestants was a lot above what is usually seen in similar events. St must be months and montiis since Joe Cha.mberla.in last won a race, hut the old fellow is still kept at it. At Foxiors he looked very big, and at no part of the Herrington Vi'elter, in which he took part, was he at id I dangerous. Shannon sports are looking forward with interest to ;ie>.r approaching meeting. heir course., which is nicely r.ii.»:sued, tbongh a bit 011 the small Kr.U , has n eently been harrowed two or three tunes, rolled and top-dres>:od, and is now looking in tip-top condition. Redshank (The Australian), who started in. the Maiden Hurdles atFoxton, and who has a Shannon Cup to his' credit, was purchased by Mr Hikaka. owner of St. Claimer, and will, it is understood, be given a chance to distinguish himself in hunters' hardies and steeplechase events. Lull, the hurdler in A'" Hall's stable at Feilding, also has a Shannon Cup to his credit. "Tony" Mcssene, caretaker of the Foxton racecourse, was very successful with his charges at the recent meeting—two firsts and a second falling to him. Waipaku, winner of the Telephone Hack Race, claims an engagement in the Egmont Sires' i'roduce Stakes, and should be one of the hardest to beat if he retains form. The Marton Jockey Club intend , making extensive improvements to their course, and have recently accepted a tender for enlarging the jockeys' room, erecting 18 additional stalls, and other ivork. In a recent letter to the secretary of the Manawatu Racing Club, Mr Wanklyn, Christchurch, states he has had enquiries from India in connection with his totalisator. Mr

Wanklvn is desirous of getting a photograph of one oi the latest machines, and as ho is evidently impressed by the outside arrangements at Awapuni, has asked Mr Johnston to obtain - a large-sized photograph of the machine intalled at Awapuni. The request will be acceded to at an early date. __Tho Hawk;' s .Bay light-weight, D. Kemp, was the most successful rider at the Foxton Meeting. having four wins to his credit. Arthur Olliver was close up with three, while the following- saluted the judge once each:—AV. H. Telford, Jackson, A. Lord, R. Cameron, S. Crawford, C. Jenkins, Lewis, and G. Laing. Following up statistical results_ it is further gathered that Lochiel's son, Strowan, was the most successful sire represented, he securing two first by the aid of Montigo. iSt-rowan was the only sire obtaining two wins, fourteen "different sires _ being represented in the remaining races. Hie iSoult pony Lord Soult has won close upon £800 in stakes—not a bad result from an £80 purchase, which was all the money Mr J. Syinons, of

Jboxtoiij gave for tiie gelding, j J. no ugh looked upon with almost disfavour for a long time, on account or reported unsoundness. Lord Soult lias weathered the stress and battle of hard courses much better than many a better-legged one. and at the present tune the gelding is pracw ■ i sounc ' cr than he ever was. With the near approach of the autumn racing, and softer going -jOrd Soult should further increase his winnings before the season is out. There is a great dearth of good it", 1 ,- Is<iw Zealand at present. At the Wellington meeting the hurdle events practically '"went begginw " ; is reported that the Australian colt L/Oilarit may be given an opportunity to distinguish himself 011 tiie .English turf. A Southern writer savs that a Wellaii.v sp<»-t has secured from Mr be v tor. owner of Sceptre, a racing plate in which the famous nip re won the Si, James" Palace Plate in 19CW. 'i he souvenir lias been presented to the "Wellington Racing Club, and wiII probably adorn the Mail i)! clie club s new building, where, no uout>i, it wdl be hisiilv prized. 0 " 1 tie we! [-Known rider .Arthur birch, w ho will ho remembered as the rider of Moifaa, when

the New Zealand horse won tlie Liverpool Grand National, mot witli :i very serious accident last month. A liorso called Black Ferry fell with Birch while contesting a race at Gatwick, and oven if he survives it is feared that the unfortunate horseman will he paralysed for life. The crack English, two-year-old, Polar Star, was not thought much of as a yearling. His owner, Col. Hal! Wnikor, stated that the yomig-Kts-r was very plain and timid, also undersized and ewe-necked, and was condemned by every good judge who visited the stud, consequently he thought it useless to enter him for classic events. All of which goes to show that ''yon can never tell." An interesting point of law for racing men, whether a trainer is bound to keep an owner minutely informed as • to the form of a racehorse while in training, came up for decision at the Paris law courts on nii ■^ T ° vem ' )or - A trainer, James was alleged to have concealed ..20m -\l. Hubert Texier the progress made by the latter's filly, La Sirene. 'Ibe owner claimed 60,000 francs damages, and obtained judgment f: or lo.QOO francs. Notice of appeal was given.

A j oowoomba paper mentions that after being unconscious for eleven days as a result oi Pooh Bah falling with him at the meeting there on Boxing ]>ay, the jockey C. MeGrowdie suddenly 7 came to, and immediately asked 'for a smoke. This nas him, and it appeared to clear his brain, as in conversation aiterwards with some friends lie said be lelt quite well. The following day lie was lip and walking about. New \ork papers claim that Mr , ; Keene tops the list of the world's owners in regard to winnings m stakes during his long career as an owner m both hemispheres. With twenty-four of his best racehorses he has, it is stated, won 1,087,036d0i5. It is estimated that minor races won by other horses would increase the total by another IOO.OOOdoIs. This make Mr Iveene's grand total oi l.ldZ.O.'j'.idok.. a. nice sum enough, but still a long way behind the aggregate winnings of the late Duke of Westminster, who won in stakes (not c^) ., untl '. money) no less than .wdol,Gl*i, which in American monev comes to 1,i77,747d015.

The celebrated American jockey Danny Ma her, has been giving The 1 atlev some impressions of his experiences of .English racing. lieferring to the difference between .English and American horses, he says: Again .when comparing English" racehorses with American, the latter, I think, do not coine out any too well, for only on very rare occasions in the hind of the Stars and Stripes are such fine .specimens of the thorough bred ioalcd as Bock Sand, Aid i a trick, Spea rni i nt —to say notiiing oj equine wonders such as Pretty Pohy-—all oi which are anything from 14il) to 21 lb in front of the best American horses. By the way, talking of •spearmint, I must endorse the opinion of Bernard Dillon, who rode the son of Carbine in the Grand Prix in .prance this year, when lie says that Spearmint is the gain est horse he has ever ridden. As many people will no doui,t_ remember, I rude. Major Eustace Loder's colt in the Derby, and a. long way from home I formed tiie opinion that 1 was up on "something extra good." Spearmint, like nearly nil the Carbines, is a line stayer, and is. moreover, the gamost oi the game, and 1 shall not forget tor many a long day the way in which lie shook off the challenge of Picton some distance, from the finish. As a. matter of fact, the finish was not a close one, but, not wishing to takeany risks, 1 shook up "Tom," as Spearmint is called by the Clarehaven stable, and the way he answered my call is one which does one good to think about because it was so genuine—like that of the man who, : finding himself in difficulties, says: "No matter what happens, I will see I things through, to the bitter end."

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/MS19070129.2.3

Bibliographic details

SPORTING., Manawatu Standard, Volume XLI, Issue 8195, 29 January 1907

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1,787

SPORTING. Manawatu Standard, Volume XLI, Issue 8195, 29 January 1907

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