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KYEBURN MURDER.

R.M. COURT NASEBY, AUGUST 28. (Beforo H. W. Robinson. Esq., • R.M., and M. J. S. Mackenzie, L. W. Bnsch, and N. P.HJorring, Esqs., J.P.'s.) Ah Lee (Alias Lee Tow) and Lee Guy were brought up on remand. The charges previously laid against them were withdrawn, and new ones substituted. The information first taken was against Lee Guy, on a charge of murder. The information was laid by Detective Henderson. Commissioner Weldon, with him Inspector ETicksou, conducted the prosecution. Mr. Rowlatt defended Lee Guy. R. H. Browne, C,E , was the first witness called. He deposed that he knew the locality of the murder, and had made a scale plan of it. (The plan was produced.) The plan showed the house occupied by Mrs Young, the outhouses near it, Mrs Young's garden, the roads leading to it, the haystack in Marshall's paddock, M'Hardy's house, the hut occupied by Lee Guy, &c. The witness wa3 cross-examined by Mr Rowlatt as to the depths of the dam and race. At this stage the question of interpretation came up. Mr Weldon wished Wong Ah Tack to interpret, instead of Wong Gye, as at the last hearing. Mr Rowlatt stated that Albert Leung Chung, the interpreter who had been engaged to watch the interpretation on behalf of the accused, was of opinion that Wong Ah lack was not competent, and was unfair. He asked that Wong Gye should interpret. Mr Weldon said that Wong Ah Tack always interpreted for the police in Dunedin, and was thoroughly trustworthy, Their Worships decided that Wong Ah Tack should be swoin to do the principle amount of the interpreting, but that Wong Gye should also be sworn to be referred to in case of any dispute. Wong Ah Tack and Wong Gye were then sworn. Alexander M'Hardy, carter, Kyeburn, sworn, said: He lived about' 400 yds from Mrs Young's house. Recollected the morning of August 4>. Accused came to my place that morning about 7-30 a.m In- conse. quence of what he told me I went to Mrs Yount>'s. He told me Mrs Young " too muchee fall down ; too muchee die." He pointed to Mrs Young's house, and said. "House too muchee broke •; you go down." On mv arrival at the house I saw a chair at the right hand of the door on the outside. Saw a. hay fork (similar to that p oduced) stuck 111 the ground, nearly in front of the door. S.iw a brass candlestick outside the door, on the left hand side. The door was partly open, the hinge being off. It was hanging by the lower hinge. 1 entered the house. Saw the bedelothing, with the mattress, lying on the floor, and Mrs Young lying partly on the mattress. She was lying partly on her left side, with her back to the door. I observed blood all over the place, and on her face. She had a nightdress and petticoat on or over her. I am not sure which. I said, " Mrs Yoimg, who's done this." She did not appear to take any notice I knelt down, and reached over her, and looked in her face. I then repeated my She muttered, in a scarcely audible voice, " bad man " or " bad men." The contents of the house were turned over. The bedstead was bare. I then said " Do you know me Mrs Young." She partly turned her head, took hold of my hand, and said " Yes, yes," as if she were choking. J think 1 was the first European there. I as-ked, "In the name of God, Mr 3 "Young, who done this ?" She raised her hand, and pointed in the direction of her bed. Her feet were lying towards the bed. She then raised her hand her to head. She could move her hand pretty freely. She said again " bad men." I then left for my horse, came back in about 15 minutes, and found hep a little weaker. She was still alone. I said, *' Mrs Young, I am going for the police and the doctor." She said, "Yes, yes." I then left for Naaeby. I went to Mrs

McCarthy's oik the way, and told her to go to Mrs Young's I have been her neighbor for the last ten years, The residence of the ac ctised is near MPs Young's house He has lived there nearly four years Pe is the nearest resident. On the night of the 3rd \ugust I returned between 11 and. 12 o'clock, and did not go to bed till ten minutes to 2. When I went to bed it was very dark, calm. and . misty or hazy. Before I went I did not hear any sound, nor after, have often heard Mrs Young's doc barking when I went in bed. I b;lieve Mrs Young and the accused were on very friendly terms He used to frequent Mrs Young's place. He used to carry water and scrub for her, and work for her in different ways. I never knew Mrs Young's dog bark at Lee Guy, while he was frequenting .the place. She had the dog for about three years. I could see Mrs Young's house from mine. The Court at 1 p.m. adjourned for an hour. Alexander M-'Hardy was put in the box, after adjournm mt, and was cross-examined, by Mr Rowlatt. I knew Mrs Young very well, and was on friendly terms with her. She usually went to bed between nine and ten o'clock. I left my own house between eleven and twelve o'clock on the forenoon of the 3rd. I was not doing anything particular that day. I had nothing to eat, as far as I know, from the time I left my own house in the morning till I returned to it in the evening I may have had something at James M'Neil's. Had two or three glasses of beer at Archer's. Was sober when I got home. Jame3 M'tfeil came home with me. He was sober. He stayed at my house from between "eleven and twelve p m. till two a.m. on the morning of the 4th. We had supper, but not a drop of whiskey or beer, or anything of the kind. We were in the kitchen, the window of which is on the side of the house that is nearest to the house of Mrs Young Can see Mrs Young's house from that window. There was no blind. The glass was quite bare of covering. I did not look out of the window towards Mrs Young's, Looked to wards Mrs Young's as I went into the house. Therj was no light in Mrs Yourg's house, and everything appeared quiet. Had a dog with me when I came home. I did not tie up my dog He always remains loose in the house. Did not hear any barking, or any unusual noise that night. Mrs Young used to keep a small curly dog. It would bark at anything. It would bark at strangers. Do not recollect seeing the dog on the morning of the 4th. Saw the dog about the house on the morning of the sth. After Lee Guy was in my house, and told me to go to Mrs Young, he said he was going to Forgie and Parker. I did not observe in what direction he went. Did not see Lee Guy at Mrs Young's bouse any time on the morning of the 4th. Saw Forgie there. Lee Guy did not appear out of breath when he came to my house. Mrs Young was not much in the habit of visiting her neighbors. She was very seldom away from home, except on Sundays. She was usually absent on church Sundays. Sometimes she would be absent from two jO three hpurs. Am sure Mrs Young knew me on the morning of the 4th. Am certain she knew what I said to her, although she was unable to speak. She spoke distinctly enough to make me sure she said "bad man" or "bad men." Do not think she was ible to utter a man's name. When I returned, after getting my horse, 1 do not think she knew me. Did not see her alive again. Lee Guy wa,s in the habit of calling Mrs Young, " me mamma." Have heard Mrs Young speak of Lee Guy in very high terms. Do not know whether she paid him for the services he rendered her. Know accused used to get milk from deceased everymorning, sometimes at six or seven and at eight or nine' Have seen accused go for milk with a tin billy or pannikin. Did not notice a billy or pannikin at Mrs Young's house that morning, I do not know whether there was any water in the dam on the 3rd, but there was on the 4 th Mrs Young had the reputation of having money. Mr D. M'Gregor lately visited Vlrs Young. I believe he went on the 3rd- Do not know whether bis visit was of business or pleasure. I never borrowed money of her. Was just getting up when accused came to my house Did not wake till about 7 a.m. My dog is a watch dog, but did not make any unusual noise on the night of the murder. The blood about the house was fresh, and the cut above her riyht eye was still oozing blood when I went into her house in the morning. Margaret Mary Forgie, sworn, said : Am wifa of Thomas Forgie, mmer, Kyeburn. On the morning of the 4th of this month Lee Guy came to my honse. He said something was wrong with Mrs Young. My husband came in with Lee Guy. I told my h'isban'd he had better go down at once. Lee Guy said "come quick." My husband then went away with Lee Guy and Mr Parkflr. I followed about half an hour afterwards. On entering tho house I saw Mrs Young lying on the floor. She had some dresses over her, and her face was covered in blood. Mrs M'Carthy arrived shortly after. The witness was going on to say what she asked of Mrs Young and her answer when Mr Rowlatt objected that evidence must be forthcoming that deceased was conscious and knew that she was about to die, before what was evidently going to be said would be admissible. Mr Weldon said he would prove this, as far as it could be proved. Continned : I leaned over Mrs Young, and I think she knew me. I attended to Mrs Young, and remained with her till her death, About 1.30 pin she died. Mr Rowlatt urged that his objection had not been satisfied. Their Worships ruled that the evidence would be taken, and its admissibility would have to be determined by the superior court. Continued : When I leaned over her I.thought she was going to recover. She opened one eye, and I said, "Mrs Young tell me who done it; was it Chinamen ?" She distinctly said "yes." I then asked hor " was it Englishmen ?" She said, " no." I then went outside, and called Lee Guv, in the presence of Mrs M'Carthy. I said. " Mrs Young says Chinamen done it." Lee Guy began to cry, and said Chinamen would kill him. I then returned inside Mrs Young's house. 1 again asked her, " was it Chinamen ? " she replied, " yes." I then asked her, " was it Englishmen ? " and she saiid," no." We then got blankets, and hot water, and put them to her feet and side. Mr Parker came in, and picked oet some cord from her hair. The doctor arrived about U o'clock. She was then lifted on to the sofa. After she was lifted on to the sofa, Mr Parker picked up a silk handkerchief, covered in blood, tied in a knot, as if it had been tied over her face. There were three large stones in the house, two of them, covered with blood. Saw a hayfork, candlestick, and chair, outside. The house appeared ransacked. Cross-ervnined by Mr Rowlatt: When I first went to the House I thought there was a chance of Mrs Young's recovering. I did not say in Mrs Young's hearing whether she was likely to recover or die. After I had got the answer " Chinamen " to my question .1 did not ask what Chinamen. I did not think, at the time, of asking her what Chinaman. It did not occur to me that she knew any other Chinaman but Lee Guy, and I never suspected him. She said '•yes" quite distinctly. Mrs Young pronounced my own name, " Maggie," twice. M.v husband called me Maggie, and Mrs Young knew that, but she was not in the habit of calling me " Maggie." I vas moistening her month with a feather with brandy and water. She was resisting, and I trying to coax her, said, " it was Mrs Forgie," and then I s lid it is •' Maggie." She then repeated the word, " Maggie, Maggie." I think she knew me then When I tried to put the feather to her lips she tried to put my hand away, saying, "na, na." Her mouth was sore. I think at the time she could pronounce a man's name. I did not see the dog about tho house that morning. I understood Lee Guy to mean, when he said the Chinamen would kill him, that he was frightened he might ibe murdered, as well as Mrs Ynung. He was frightened to stay in bis own hut. During the time Mrs Young was alive I did not see Lee Guy in the room where she was lying. In saying that the house was ransacked, I did not mean that the kitchen was disturbed. Margaret M'Carthy, sworn, Haid: I reside at Eyeburn, with my husband, a miner. In consequence* of wliat was communicated to me I went down to Mrs Young's house, on the morning of the 4th August. I reached there before 9 a.m. I s.iw Mrs Forgie at the aoor. I heard Mrs Forgie say to Mrs Young, loaning over her, " Mrs Young, who has done it to you? was it a Chinaman ? " She said, " yes," quits distinctly, twice. I last saw Mrs Young about 6 minutes to 6, passing my place, going home, «n the preyious evening. She had her dog with her. I can hoar hor dog bark when I am at home. It bark»d for a considerable t-injo at about 10 or 11 o'clock that night. I was sitting at tho fire when I heard it. It seamed as if the dog was barking outßide, When I was going to Mrs Yonng's houso the next morning the dog met me, and went back with mo. Cross-examined by Mr Rowlatt: When I saw Mr* Young I thought she was dying, but did not think sho would dio as soon as she did. When I was washing her eyo, I asked if I was hurting her, and she answered," no." I askod her who did it, and she did not answer. She used to keep tho dog on tho chain

at night. lam snre the dog was loose on tho night or the 3rd. I can see Mrs Young's from our house. I went to bed at 11*30 on the night of the 3rd. I heard no unusual noise that night, beyond the barkin? of the dog. I could not hear anyone passing on foot on the road near my honso. I could hear a call or cooey from Mrs Younjr's hnus'v Dr WluttonJbeing.'xamiiii.'d.aaM: Atu a duly qualified msdical practitioner, residing at Naseby. On the 4cn inst, from information received, X Went to Mrs Things arriving there about 11.30. I found Mrs Toangljltig on her back. A m t.ress was under her, S? U f ? lie ' 3 ' 10n ' llW3 ' She was covered with two blankets and a quilt-. Over the right eye was a lacerated wound, about half an inch in extent. The wound was in a line with her eyebrow. In depth it extended to the bone. The right eyebrow and eyelid ware black. The right eyeball was uninjured. Both ears-and mastoid processes were black. Round th>; mouth and the angles of the mouth the skin was abraded. There was one scratch on the tongue. There ware sis distinct scratches on the chin. On the throat there ware four marks of briiises, all in front. The left collar bone was broken. Over the left shoulder there was a large patch of eflnsed blood. There was Ikiwise a patch of effused blood on the left arm On | the outer end of the left collar bone. was a patch of abraded skin. On the left hip was a bruise. On ■ the lower part of the right elbow joint was a bruise. On the front of the right forearm were four distinct pi uaes. Over the ulnar process of the right- arm. on tiie outer side, was a wound, showing the distinct marks of three teeth, and on the • inner side of the same process were three marks of teeth. Dried blood was on both hauds of deceased. On the palm of the left hand were several fibres, dried in the blood. 1 Here were no scratches about the nails, nor did I nnd, under the nails, any pieces of hair or skin. Over the left elbow joint there was a bruise, similar, as to size and character, to that over the right elbow L omt , - £ here were bruises over the backs of both hands, t-hat over the left hand being the largest and most distinct. On the outer side of the right knee w , a f a wound. There were bruises over the middle of both bones of the leg. On examination of the injuries received:to tho ribs of the left side,l found 8 of them broken. The first and second ribs were broken in one plac s each ; the third in two places : the fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh in three places : and the eighth in two places. Several ends of the ribs h;id pierced the lin ng membrane of the walls of the chest, or the pleura. The first rib had pierced the sub-clavian vein, causing internal hemorrhage from which death had ensued. The left lung, pericardium, and heart, were uninjured. The left chest was full of blood. This had flown from the pierced sub-clavian vein. There was no injury to the bone over the right-eye, neither was any ariery cut put the vein which runs in that region was cut through. I found no evidence of gany sexual outrage having been committed. The cause of death was internal hemorrhage. The injury to the ribs and collar bone might have been caused by the blow of some heavy body. One of the large stones which I saw m the house would have been sufficient. The deceased woula, I think, have been lying down when she received the injuries to her left side. The bruises I have spoken of indicated a struggle. One of the stones might have inflicted the cut over the eye' I think the injuries must have been inflicted 8 or lo hours before I arrived. The mark 3 on the lips and mouth might have been caused by an attempt to gag. X have seen the accused's mouth. Any ordinary mouth would have inflicted similar marks to those inflicted on - the wrist-. "When X saw deceased she was dying; her death was inevitable. From the nature of the injuries 1 should say that the loss of consciousness would be gradual. Cross-examined by Mr Eowlatt: It is possible she might have been conscious two hours before* I saw her. Ido not think she would have lapseß of consciousness. Her injuries were not such as to interfere with her articulation while conscious. Ido not think they were inflicted fourteen orfifteen hours before I saw her. Possibly all the injuries might have been inflicted in half an hour. In my opinion the first injury was that to the eyebrow, and then that to the ribs. Deceased did not speak while I was present. r In reply to a question by the Bench,, witness said: It is quite possible that she may have fainted immediately after receiving the more important injuries. That would, of course, mean a temporary loss of consciousness, from which she would recoven An. inexpjriene d person might then have thought her dt a I.- In ray opinion it would have taken a longer time tli.m five minutes to inflict the injuries. When first I s;;sv Mrs Young the blood was not flowing from the wound over the right eye. The blood on the wound, anil for about an inch around it, was uucoagulated. I should think the wound must have been inflicted • carder than 6 o'clock in the morning.. - cpu ?' fe ' at 7 P-™* adjourned till 10 a.m. on the following morning.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 27, Edward Morton, Sergeant of Police, stationed at Naseby, sworn, said : Prom information received went to the house of Mrs Young, Kyebura, on morning of August 4tli, at 11 30. a.m. Mrs Young was lying on a sofa. Dr Whitton, Mrs McCarthy, and Mrs Furgie, were attending her at the time. Pound top hinge of door broken off. The door was broken from the iock, and was partly lying on the floor. I saw three large stones lying on the floor in the room. Have since weighed them. One weighed 22 IBs, one 27 lbs, and one 40 lbs. The two latter ones had a deal of blof-d on them, and wero near the side of the bed. The largest one was about four feet from the other two stones. The mattiess and bidding were thrown on the floor, and the contents of two boxes w-re scattered about also. Spots of blood were on the bedding, on the bed, and on some of the clothing taken out of the boxes. It appeared as if a close search had been made for something in the house. Mrs Young died at 1.30 p.m. on the 4th. After she died I went with Mr M'Gregor and Mr Parker to a small cupboard in the kitchen. Behind some crockery in this li'tle cupboard Mr M'Gregor found a purse, which he handed to me. It contained nine £1 notes, two half sovereigns, and fourteen shillings in silver. Under the cupboard on which the table was stand-' ing Mr Parker found an old coffee tin, which he handed to me. It contained two £lO notes, one £3 note, two deposit receipts on the Bank of New Zealand, Naseby, for. £954. It also contained a gold ring, with the initials M. Y. on it. In the box in the first room I found half of a dividend warrant for 48 shares in the Colonial-g'ank of New Zealand. Also found a silver watciJ atid twb sm'all gbld brooches in a paper collar box. This property is now in my possession. I searched pn/the floor where the deceased had been lying. I .found a white silk handkerchief; with a great deal of'biood on it (produced) ; a nightcap,covered in blood; with a tare on the top of it; two nightcap strings, knotted, which appeared to have been torn "aivay; two pieces of string, with blood on them; a piece of rice bag, with spots of blood on it; a cotton handkerchief, with pink border, with Mood on it and five spots of ink; two hair-, pins, with blood on them. I produce three fibres, which were taken from the hand of the deceased by the doctor, and which he handed to me. I examined the front door and found six dents in it, which : appeared to have been made by a stone or stones, held in a person's hands.. On the "outside of. the house, on the right hand side of the door, wasa pitchfork, Hten feet distant, now produced. The prongs were stuck in the ground, The candlestick now produced was on the same side of the door, but closer. to it. There was a stain of blood on the candlestick. A chair and a cushion were also outside, the latter having spots of blood on it. The stick produced I found in the house. On the 6th of August Inspector Hickson pointed out to me certain footmarks in the ground at the corner, of the garden fence, which footprints I pointed out to Messrs Harvey and O'Connor, bootmakers; Accused lives about 60 yards from Mrs Young's house, at the back. The marks on the door would, in my opinion, have required considerable force to cause them. The day after the murder, when a man was chopping wood with a tomahawk, outside Mrs Youngs house I went close to Lee Guy's hut, and standing on the further side of it, I clearly heard the strokes of the tomahawk. Cross-examined by Mr liowlatt: There were no regular window fastenings to the windows of Mrs Young's house. The kitchen window was' fastened with one cut nail. To the best of my belief the front windows opened with a hinge. They were jara.nsd, not nailed. It would not have taken so much to break i,hem open as it.would to have beaten in the door. I think I could have found the money Mr M'Gregor found if I had: made a close search. To have made a close search would taked two hours or more. There was a number of papers and letters scattered about, which I gathere i up, and put in a box. When I made the experiment about the sound, on the day afterthe murder, the man chopping wood was so placed that Mrs Young's house was not between him and me. Mr M'Gregor's house intervened and I could not seethe man. There was a small stream running in the waterrace between the two houses. The water race is four or. Ave feet higher than the ground on which Lee Guy's hut stands. The fall of the water was making a little noise, When I made the experiment I was outside Lee Guy's hut. I was in Lee Guy's hut on the 4th, ho being proseut. From the appearance of the hut I should imagine someone had been sleeping on the floor. There was a bunk in the hut, with blankets on it. There was grass on the flour. , Hugh Marshall, son of Andrew Marshall, said: Know cottage occupied by the late Mrs Young. My father has a stack of oats about 350 yards from Mrs Young's house. I missed a hayfork from there on the sth. I next saw it at Mrs Young's house on the 6th. The fork produced is the one I missed. Last saw it at stack on Thursday, 29tli July.. . , At this stage, a Chinese witness was about to be examined', and Mr liowlatt again objected to Wong Ah Tack, but the Court allowed him to go on. Ah Kin, miner, Kyebura, sworn by blowing out a match, said : Do not know the day of Mrs Young's murder. I know where Lee Guy lives. Do not remember the fact of Mrs Young's murder. I live about a mile or half a mile from Mrs Young's. I recollect the police searching my hut. It was on a Wednesday. I forget how long ago. I know Marshall's paddock. I see that paddock every day. I did not see anyone near the paddock the day before the police searched my hut. A documsnt was shown to witness, and a signature on it was also shown him. He said : The signature is mine. You (Wong Ah Tack) told me to say it. I meant by that that you (Ah Tack) went into the gaol, two or three times, and told me to say it Ah Tack told mo to say that Leo Guy went down to the stack and took away a fork, The statement signed by witness was then put in, twirl their Worship's read it. I have not spoken to any Chinaman. If you (Ah Tack) had not told me to say it I should not have.said it, Mr Bowlatt said he was now going to ask witness some questions affecting the interpreter, and would ask that Wong Gye be allowed to interpret at least for a few minutes. The Bench, after consideration, decided that Wong Ah Tack should continue to interpret. Cross-examined by Mr Bowlatt: Ah Tack asked me if I had read tho reward. I Baid no, I nevor

ra .d it. I cnn't read. Ah Tack told mo that the Governor in "Wellington had put out £IOO reward, to any one who would tell who was the murderer of Mrs Yomig. Ah Tack told me I would get the reward if I told something about a fork (produced) Ah Tack said if I would tell about the fork I would ba let out. '''his took place about Ilth or 12th of the Chinese seventh month. Ah Tack came twice to m?. A discussion then ensued re the statement made by Ah Km. Mr ffeWon then, with the permis ion o! the Court, stated how the statemet had been made—vi.;: that- the witnes had voluntarily sent for tile interpreter, and had made tlio statement, which had been tak -n down by Mr Hickson, and that he was cognisant of it, and even once made a correction in it* rliis statement had been made voluntarily, and no inducement or promise had been held out. H? wished to show that the evidence had noi been extracted by the polk e. Their "Worships said Mr Weldon might make his mind easy on this point. The- statement was then read, as follows, to the prisoner, for him to say whether it was true or not Her Majesty's Goal, ~L m ; , ' ' ' Nasabj, August ISth, 18iS0. thirteen days ago, the day before the murder of Mrs Young, I saw Lee Guv gn out at half--011 Tuesday, over to the stack of oats m Marshall s paddock, to the right of Mrs Young s, and take away the fork to his house. He took it down towards his house. X did not see where he went. The fork had two prongs lo it. I was knocking of work at the time. I saw no person with Lee Guy at the time. (Signed) Ah Ki\. Witness continued: At 5.30 or 61 saw a man coming from Marshall's stackyard, with a stick. The man was a long way off. Ido not know whether he was a Chinam an or a European. I said the man was Lee Guy, hut Ah Tack told me to say it. Alexander Henderson, detective constable, stationed at Dunedm, sworn, said : Have been on duty at the scene of the murder. I know Mrs Youngs house and Lee Guy s hut. The hut and the house are about sixty yards apart. I have been inside Lee Guv's hut. It is built of clay with a thatch roof, with a wooden 51 I nsi ?J- Saw Lee Guy at the hut on Satui day 7th. I said to Lee Guy, Do you know who killed Mrs Young? He replied. Me tell you by-and-bye. He then took a book, which contained Chineie characters, with English translation, On Tuesday, 10th, Constable Nolan struck the door of Mrs "Tonne's house with the largest stone now in Court. I listened at mrt in a crouching position, ana I could hear the noise very distinctive Cross-examined by Mr Rowlatt: I did not particularly observe the height or thickness of the walls, or the thickness of the door. I was outside the hut when the experiment was made. I did not go inside the hut to try whether the sound could be heard with the door shut. I think the sound could be heard a great deal farther than the place where I was standing, and the dents made in the door by Constable oa n were not nearly so large as those previously. iwM 8 ' +« e blll ir iu^ ee G "y's hut was on the side furthest from Mrs Young's house. There was not much water in the race running past the house It was making a trickling noise. Ah Lee, sworn by blowing out a match, said : I am sometimes a miner, and sometimes a laborer "I livp tL rnl' Pl h ? U K 7- , J know Lee Gut. I was last at Lee Guy s hut about four weeks ago, or a little more X know an iron house near Lee Guy's, about a chain or more distant. A discussion then arose as to prisoner answerin" questions which might criminate him Mr Kowlutt objecting, as prisoner appeared in the double charac-: waspendin 1 " 111353 3nd 0f one :l S ainst whom a charge Their Worships decided that prisoner should be warned, and should have the previlege of "refusing to answer any question if he thought fit Witness was cautioned, and was asked if he understood it. He replied, "yes," and the examination was resumed : Do not know when the woman who ] 1 , ve < i ™. l ; be h?«se was murdered. I never stated did recollect when she was murdered. I was at the Hogburn on the night of the 3rd. How do I know whether Lee Guy was at Mrs Young's ? Lee Guy is my cousin. X have not anything to say touch- 1 ing the death of Mrs Young. i Mr Weldon here asked for a remand for 8 days. Mr Rowlatt strongly objected. There was nothing against accused to justify a remand. In fact, everything went to show that it was extremely improbable that he would lift a finger against the woman. He thought it would be very wrong if the accused were kept in prison for eight days more, simply to enable the police to fish about for more evidence. The Bench asked, if a remand was granted, were there reasonable grounds to expect new evidence Mr Weldon said another case was pending, and he did not know what might arise out of it He would at any rate ask that the remand should be granted till the second case was disposed of. The Bench granted remand to September 4, with the understanding that accused should be brought up as soon as possible.

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KYEBURN MURDER., Mount Ida Chronicle, Volume X, Issue 572, 28 August 1880

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KYEBURN MURDER. Mount Ida Chronicle, Volume X, Issue 572, 28 August 1880

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