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THEATRE GOSSIP

PLAYS AND PLAYERS.

(By Fra Diavolo). Mr Scott Colville, the big man in front of "The Dandies" and many ! other entertainment specialties has i been very ill, his Blenheim friends ' will regret to hear. He is still on ! his farm at. Onehunga, and very i -weak, but making ground daily. It ! was pneumonia that brought him ! down, a mild attack, which upon reI lapse developed to the double variety, ! and nearly accounted for him in its j ravages. He lost four ston© in the bout. That pantomime is a decaying joy is the melancholy conclusion forced | upon the elderly people who used to ! enjoy it, now that London's West j End can only show two theatres that give it a home (says a London correspondent). Is the war responsible, or has the era of the long run for very ordinary theatrical productions crowded the old pantomime out? ! "Chu Chin Clio'v" goes on and on, I but that spirited Australian, Oscar j Apclie, has not been so fortunate with j his second, and reputedly more costly production with its Egyptian setting. It was withdrawn after hvt a few weeks. In addition to "Chu Chin Chow," which really is glorified pantomime, rovuo claims the elderly attention formerly davoted to pantomimes, while youthful minds which used to furnish the excuse for tho elders' indulgence have to content themselves with the suburban "movies." A valiant attempt- is being made just now by Martin Harvey to give Shaksnei'3 a show at Co vent Garden, but that otherwise excellent ac-tor is not of the first dimension. The Australian, Miss Marie Lohr, seems to have made a standing success with the problemesque play, "The Voice from the Minaret," which has now re-uhed its 150 th perj i'ormance. Most of the people in the i musical world are now to bo heard more frequently in the provinces than in London. Madame Melba has i been on a. provincial tour, but comes | back to Covent Garden in May. M. ' Miseho. Loon, husband of Canada's j Donalda, is for the time being the most prominent singer in the metropolis, whore' he is just now giving a recital with some of his most beautiful songs on the programme. "The Road Through the Dark" is Clara Kimball Young's latest release through Select. The story shows Clara at the height of her dramatic art. It concerns a girl who is taken possession of by a German prince who comes upon her as one of the population of a French village which is being "disciplined" by the- Huns. Her j awful career, however, is redeemed by her sacrifices for her country, and all ends happily. The play is lightened by some remarkable comedy flashes.

Lovers of a •wholesome story with gripping mystery, dramatic situations and suspense, coupled with excellent production and the best of acting,

will ihorous'Ulyu enjoy the fine English production," "The Valley of Fear," founded on the fascinating and exciting story by Conan Doyle in which the famous detective, Sherlock Holmes, unravels a, startling murder mystery, and in doing so opens up a chapter of crime from the past, which iii its turn is another great detective drama—a powerful story within a story;. H. A. Saints-bury;," the famous English actor, the original Sherlock Holmes of the English stage, is the Holmes of the film, and gives a masterful performance.. He is sxipportcd by Miss Daisy Burrell, the well-known musical comedy star, Mr Cecil Mannering, the .popular English dramatic star, and a cast of performers all well known in England as leaders in their profession. Mary Pickford has suffered irreparable loss in the recfiit fire at the Brunton Studios. Miss Pickford is now working on "Pollyanna," and "Cootie," an Airedale who appeared in many important scenes, was burned to death. The director is now confronted with the problem of finding another dog exactly resembling "Cootie." If this cannot be done it will be necessary to throw away 2000 feet of film, and get another dog for tho part. This would entail the loss of about £2000. Betides tho loss of the dog, about £3000 worth of scenery was burned, and Mary's double, made in wax, which saved the little star a lot of time when the camera man was arranging lighting effects in the studio, was also burned. According to publishers' estimates more than twenty million people have lead the "Taraan" series of novels by Edgar Rice Burroughs. The success of "Tarzan of the Ayes" film was therefore foreshadowed by the book's success. People of all ages, and walks j of life gave to the film that generous support they had accorded the book, and find the screen story even more fascinating than the novel, spread the tidings with the natural result that the picture broke all previous records for attendance. "The Romance of Tarzan," the sequel to "Tarzan" has been eagerly awaited by all who witnessed the former production, and it wi,s not disappoint but will only intensify the impression created by its predecessor. After a brief prologue, the story plunges its followers into tho centre of a series of tho most startling events, in ■ which battles with bloodthirsty cannibals, and equally savage beasts of the jungle provide intense excitement. Scenes of rare beauty and lusuriousness amid modern society, into which Tar- 1 zan arrives in search, of the girl of ! hsi heart, rival the gorgeous natural jungle views in excellence, of presentation and photography. Blenheim releases: "Cinderella Man" (Mac Marsh) April 6th and 7th, "Boss of the Lazy V" (Roy Stewart) April Bth and 9th, "Midnight Stage" (Frank Keenan) April 10tli and 12fch, "Stolen Orders" (June Elvidge) April 13th and 14th, "The Atom" (Pauline Stark)- April 15th and 16th, "Secret Code" (Gloria Swanson) April 17th and 19th, •'Raffles" (John Barrymore) April 20tb and 21st, "Hell Cat" (Geroldino Farrar) April 22nd and 23rd, "Dog's Life" (Charlie Chaplin) May'4th and sth. . , Henry Hebert, who recently signed a contract with Fox Film Corporation, is tho villain in "Chinatown," in which Tom Mix is the star. Dell Henderons, Fox director of "Shark Rawley," George Walsh, the star, and the entire supporting company are in Tampa, Florida, taking the exteriors of the play, which is from the pen of Thomas Fallon. Germaine Roch, a young Belgian girl, who was in Belgium while the Germans ruled that .country with an iron hand, will appear shortly in a Fox production. Hef* millionaire father was impoverished and his property confiscated by the enemy. Ben Deely, Louis Fitzroy, Harry Spingler, Mme. Rosita Marstini, Josephine Crowell, and Nigel de Brullier are in the company now making "Flames of the Flesh," in which' William Fox is starring: Gladys Brockwell, with William Scott as leading man.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/MEX19200403.2.46

Bibliographic details

THEATRE GOSSIP, Marlborough Express, Volume LIIII, Issue 79, 3 April 1920

Word Count
1,115

THEATRE GOSSIP Marlborough Express, Volume LIIII, Issue 79, 3 April 1920

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