Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

BABY WIT.

SOME o^lM SAYINGS

Moralists might illustrate the changed system of child-training by comparing the good, long-skirted, bigbonneted little girl of Kate Greenaway times, with that bush-haired, black-stockinged imp, with big sashbow and infinitesimal petticoats, who was introduced not so very long ago by, Hilda Cowhami The Cowham child, at any rate, soon grew into an institution, and has made merry in many a periodical since. "One. pleasing feature of my work," says the'artist in a paper contributed to the August Sta-aiul "is the number of letters which I receive from people and children with whom 1 have not the slightest acquaintance. Very often I get letters from mothers saying that they have dressed their little ones like a Hilda Cowham girl." In the course of many friendships with children (and in private life the artist is Mrs Lauder with a small son of her own) their quaint sayings have been a constant delight. The little daughter-of a famous actress had borne patiently one day -with many salutations when a new arrival asked the question "Have you a kiss to spare for me?" "No," said the little lady, very bored. "I haven't a kiss left in me." A child was troubled about the population of the moon. "H there are people on it," she said, "what do they do when there is only a little bit? They must get very crowded, don't they?" And another trouble concerned the angels. "What do the angels do with their wings when they lie down and go to bed?" Like the poor Indian, children easily admit animals to an equal sky. "T once asked -a little girl where her pet dog was. She turned and said to me, 'Why, he's gone to heaven. He's there now, with wings, and a crown on his head.' " And a delightfully sympathetic boy, when drawing ships one day, was'observed to place all their flajr,? hall-mast, .He explained in a hushed whisper, "All pussy's kittens died tin's .morning-." Another considerate infant, who, was going to a party, ended her nightly prayer with the petition. "And please give mo a new dress"—pause—"if you cm afford it." Angels fire not always welcome round the bed of youth. A little girl, after being assured of. their watchful presence*, pleaded, ''Mother, will you leave the light? I wouldn't liko one to settle on me!" Hilda Cowh am heard two small boys discussing the usual question where a new baby came from. "It's come from heaven ; mother told me so." said one. B"t the other had seen the baby. "Well," he answered, "I hope if I die and pro to heaven, they won't send me back like that!" Obedience itself inspired .i.nothp'l urchin, whose daddy warned him not to pick certain low-growing appJ^q. "Bo you hear? You're not to pick them." "Yes, daddy, 1 won't." And when that father again went round

the garden he found sticking out front* the trees only some well-nibbled cores."The child had taken him quite literally. He had not picked the apples.' 7

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/MEX19130915.2.9

Bibliographic details

BABY WIT., Marlborough Express, Volume XLVII, Issue 218, 15 September 1913

Word Count
505

BABY WIT. Marlborough Express, Volume XLVII, Issue 218, 15 September 1913

Working