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MADAME SORGUE.

i "THE MOST DANGEROUS ! WOMAN IN EUROPE."

! There is perhaps no single woman living to-day who has played bo vital a part in the organisation'" and inspiration of modern revolutionary movements throughout Europe as Madame Sorgue, the famous Frenchwoman, who has been described, by the public prosecutor at the Court of Assizes at Milan as "the most dangerous woman in Europe." "Sorgue," as she is known all over the Continent, is not only a distinguished (voman herseli:, but has also a . dis--1 tinguished family history. The ■daughter of Durand de Gros, the I French philosopher, who 'is chiefly ' known to fame perhaps for his theory of polyy-oisme- and of polyschisme, and , as one of the precursors of the schools of psychotherapeuties, Madame Sorgue has inherited iihe same breadth of vision which characterised her '■'"father.'She1 is that anomaly, "a re-volutionary-aristocrat/ for her grandfather was the Russian General ..CripkoS, and her uncle Istomine was , the senior admiral of the.Baltic fleet, ! and one of the most loyal upholders lof the Romanoff dynasty. Her bust ; in the Luxembourg, by Donys Puech, I conveys a wonderfully faithful refleo- | tion of the psychology of a woman who combines with a brain of exceptional power a certain childlike [directness of outlook-^a woman who ! at 19 sought a channel for her ener- | gies on tho French stage, and then I passed in rapid succession through I the roles of journalist, and revolu--1 tionary speaker and writ-er, having I to-day an international reputation in ! the latter capacities. She has been , a thorn in the side of most) European I Governments, and in 1898, was the ';.'storm-centre of Portuguese politics. It "is not difficult, after you liave met this extraordinary woman, to believe the story of the part she played in the Intimation al Press Congress of that year at Lisbon, which was openr ©d by the late ill-fated King Carlos in person. Every journalist in the Congress rose to receive the .King five fclie irreconcilable Sorgue,^ who rfemainecL seated. Wh^n the King passed, hear.her!:-;it_ \vas- as thougli,:he :^apit%l;>-^r'lm\fa(M;blancb.ey./''^eli ; e:y;-; .Icg^aSihe'did tJiat the terriMe/Soi-gue meant to assassinate him. However •that niay be, he had her thrown into prison at Oporto^ which'" nearly precipitated,the revolution of last year, for tbe people demonstrated in' thousands arid compelled tl>e' authorities tk> act her free 4 The Portuguese Government expelled her from Lisbon, and paid a tribute to her remarkable power" oy^rtae Portuguese proletarai. iby senditig a' gunboat .,-is>\ escort her. down the Tagus because the working class of Lisbou had organised a huge demonstration on the river in, her rhonour. She has also played a pronif merit part in the Italian class struggle.1 'She was one of the .militants of the Great Parma strike, .was t indictedi for advocating the assaesibation of Victor Emmanuel (which; incidentally, she 'denied),.-.and sat in the prisoners' "cage" at Milan; but the case for the Crown broke down,* and shi> was acquitted,, being, however, ultimately condemned to serve a long term of imprisonment for her advocacy of antimilitari&m-^-a propaganda witlli which, slie has been prominently identified in France with M. Gustave He^re, the French aniin>ilitatist. Once, at Florence, she delivered her revolutionary . speeches looking down the barrels of the levelled rifles of the soldiers and she was the chief figure of the famous '•Exodo de la Belfort," when a Jarge body1 of watchmakers and metal-work-ers out of work declared-their intention of cither .'dying, or getting bread. The Government sent out two regiments of cavalry to stop the strikers, and the story of how this dauntless woman by her cool forcefulness controlled sor.ie thousands of infuriatßd an<l/ desperate men, and prevented bloodshed, reads like a page of fiction. During the recent strike in Great Britain she',. played an active part, and is still working in that, country which she believes will be the vortex •of a gigantic strike whirlpool in; the nea,r future,, violent in its "character and international in its action.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/MEX19111222.2.24

Bibliographic details

Marlborough Express, Marlborough Express, Volume XLV, Issue 298, 22 December 1911

Word Count
655

MADAME SORGUE. Marlborough Express, Volume XLV, Issue 298, 22 December 1911

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