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OBITUARY.

MR ARTHUR BEAUCHAMP

There passed peacefully away on Thursday morning, at his residence, Waikawa Road, Picton, another of our worthy pioneers, in the person of Mr Arthur Beauchamp (states the Press.) The deceased gentleman, who attained the great age of eighty-four years in October last 3 had been in failing health for some time past, and his demise was therefore not unexpected. We extend our sympathy to his widow and family in their bereavement.

Mr Beauchamp was born in Highgate, London, and was educated at Highgate Grammar School. After

some commercial experience he left England, at the age of 19. by the barque "Loch Nagar," for Australia, where he was engaged in business for several years in various parts of Victoria and New South Wales. At the age of 25, he was married to Miss Mary Elizabeth Stanley, at Port Fairy, Victoria. Mr - Beauchamp visited New Zealand to take possession of some land left to him by a relative, but owing to unlooked for complications between the Government ,and the New Zealand Land Company, of which his relative had been a promoter and shareholder, he returned to Sydney at the time of the gold rush. He unsuccessfully followed the goldfields for some time, arid finally started an auctioneering business in Melbourne, but, as the climate proved fatal to his young children, he sold out and came to New Zealand in the brig "Lalla Rookh." Mr Beauchamp settled in Picton, where he established himself in business in 1861. The .firm consisted of Messrs Beauchamp, Mcßeth, and Welford, . and they traded as merchants under the style of Beauchamp, Mcßeth and Co. Mr Welford accompanied Mr Beauchamp from Australia, in the "Lalla Rookh," which also brought to New Zealand the merchandise for the firm. The store was, we understand, situated on the site now occupied by Mr John Young's premises, in Wellington Street, and the firm subsequently erected the building now known as Philpotts' old store. Mr Beauchamp was an extremely keen politician in the early days, and was elected in the year 1866 to represent Picton in the House of Representatives. He was also a member of the same district in the Marlborough Provincial Council, and during the debate at Picton, to remove the seat of Government to Blenheim, Mr Beauchamp led a strong stonewall by speaking for 10 hours and 40 minutes. Reference to this truly wonderful speech is made by Mr T. Lindsay Buick, in his well-known book, "Old Marlborough." Mr Buick says:—"Conspicuous amongst the sturdy champions of Picton was Mr Arthur Beauchamp, who brought to the assistance of his party a verbosity worthy of the occasion. Hour

after hour he held the fort, with a J devotion that would have done hon- j our to Sir Thomas Picton himself; j and when he had been speaking for \ the best part of a day, he struck ter- j ror into the hearts of those weary j ones anxiously waiting for a division, j by explaining that 'with these few j preliminary remarks he would now j proceed to speak on the subject j under discussion.' But physical en- j durance has its limits, and after sus- { taining a single-handed combat for | ten hours and forty minutes, Mr j Beauchamp had to succumb." Prior to the inception of the Ec rough Council at Pictou, he was Chairman of the Town Board, and, in later years, he acted as Government Valuer of Wanganui. In 1867, Mr Beauchamp opened a branch business in Buller, as an auctioneer and timber merchant. He subsequently sold his interest at the Buller and started an auctioneering business at Wanganui and at Wellington, and saw-milling at Manaroa, but the sawmill was burnt down. In 1880 Mr Beauchamp removed to Christchurch, where he was a well--known auctioneer for ten years. He never remained for a great length of time in one place. Three years ago, . however, Mr and Mrs Beauchamp returned to Picton to spend their declining years. They were warmly welcomed by their many old friends, all of whom Avill deeply regret that the grand old pioneer has passed from amongst them. Of him it can be truly said, "He has fought the good fight." He fought for that which he considered right with might and main, and his public services in Marlborough, his loyalty to Picton, and his fine qualities as a citizen earned for him the esteem and gratitude of the people. A widow and four sons are left to mourn their loss. Mr Harold Beauchamp is one of Wellington's leading merchants, and Chairman of Directors of the Bank of New Zealand. Messrs Arthur, Stanley, and Harry Beauchamp are all _"on the land," at Waitara, Brunswick (near Wanganui) and Otaki, respectively.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/MEX19100430.2.12

Bibliographic details

OBITUARY., Marlborough Express, Volume XLIV, Issue 97, 30 April 1910

Word Count
786

OBITUARY. Marlborough Express, Volume XLIV, Issue 97, 30 April 1910

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