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LOCAL & GENERAL NEWS.

Fibe Escape.—A trial of a recently patented fire escape is to take place at the Bell Tower at 7.30 this evening.

Maim.—The Postal Department are advised that the Auckland-San Fran cisco despatch of the 23rd September arrived in London on the 23rd instant.

Weather Pobeoast.—Capt. Edwin wires at noon as follows:—"Strong winds to gale from between north and east and south east after 12 hours from now; glass, fall again soon; tides, high ; sea, heavy ; rain probable. *

Health Laws. —The five chief laws of health, according to a Christehureh medico, are as follow:—(1) That people should have an adequate supply of fresh and pure air; (2) that they should feed their bodies properly; (3) that they should keep their bodies properly exercised ; (4) that they should clothe their bodies properly; (5) that they should have rest and recreation.

Funny!— Thus tbe Ohristchurch Press: The angler ought to be grateful. When rain and hail were falling and gales were blowing, telegraph lines were coming down, creeks were flooded, and tbe country generally was stopping indoors all it could, the inevitable anglers' notice was posted by the Tourist Department: "Waimakariri Dirty."

St. Elmo's Fire.—A strange sight was witnessed recently by the officers of the Land liner Wakool, which arrived at Adelaide on Thursday last. A ball of fire, known by navigators as St. Elmo's Fire, was observed trana fixed to tbe top of the foremast of the steamer above the masthead light on tbe night of October sth duriag a blizzard. The decks were covered with snow at the time. The fire was of a deep limpid blue color, and was observable for fifteen minutes.

Salvation Army.—The special meetings conducted by Major Winter on Sunday were largely attended, and of an enthusiastic character. The Major's address in the morning was based on " Isaiah's Call," afternoon " Godliness versus Ungodliness," and at night " The Man coming out of Hell with his Night-cap on." This subject, from the second chapter of Jonah, was impres sively dealt with, and keenly followed by the large and .interested congregation. Ensign Sharp also addressed the meeting, and Mrs Ensign Sharp sang an appropriate solo.

Paixiser Bay.—lt is remarked that Palliser Bay, where the Addenda was wrecked on October 13th, has probably been the scene of more shipwrecks than any other part of tbe New Zealand coast. The spot where the vessel went ashore is some miles from where the ship Zuleika was wrecked, with the loss of twelve of her crew, during a great gale in April, 1897, and at which the barque Ben Avon was stranded in November last. Palliser Bay is exposed to the full force of a southerly gale, and the Cape has often been mistaken in thick weather for Wellington Heads.

Ranfurlt.—The following gem from the Belfast Newsletter, in connection with the return of Lord Kanfurly to his ancestral home at Dungannon (Ireland) will interest New Zealanders:— " As indicating that the life of a New Zealand Governor is a somewhat strenuous one, our readers will be interested to learn that his Lordship's annual travels amounted to about 11,000 miles, a little over one-half being made by rail. From one end of tbe colony to tbe other the distance is about 1100 miles, so that his Majesty's representative has no easy task set him to keep in touch with those whom he governs. The amount of routine work, too, is really very great, and the post is far from being a sinecure."

Prohibition Ashburton.—A return of the quantities of liquor carried into Ashburton by rail in the last year of license and the first year of no-license is exceedingly interesting. The number of cases of beer decreased under no license from 675 to 468; the number of hogsheads from 829 to 155 ; and the number of barrels from 185 to 57, but the numliui of kegs increased from 76 o 615, and the number of kilderkins fro en three to 250. Also, 39 jars and eight casks went in under no license, against no jars and three casks nnder license. Cases of spirits decreased under no-license from 1207 to 731, and half-casks from 85 to 11; but jars increased from 50 to 256. The carrying of no-license has had practically no effect on wine, the import being about the same. There is a decrease in the import of cider.

AuutTERATiON. — The Victorian Government Analytical Chemist has reported to the Premier that as the result of his analysis of 162 samples of cordials submitted to him 151 were found to be adulterated with chemical preservatives. Attention was also given to prepared sausages, of which 100 samples obtained from as many butchers's shops in Melbourne and suburbs were submitted. Analysis showed that all were adulterated with chemical preservatives, while a very large percentage contained an excessive amount of starch. The Government Analyst states that he has detected chemical preservatives in biscuits, the use of coal-tar and yellow dyes by pastrycooks in place of eggs (for imparting a false appearance of richness to their goods), salad oil that is really mineral oil of petroleum origin, and coffee that is principally roasted grain.

The Licensing Rill.—Daring the passage of the bill in the Legislative Council amendments were made to permit of prohibition orders being issued by a Magistrate in privacy, and to allow Magistrates to issue a prohi. bition order without application against a person who has been n.ore than twice convicted of drunkenness within six months; bringing Bellamy s under the same hours as hotels and clubs in regard to the sale of liquor ; repealing the privileges formerly given to bona fide travellers ; and removing from the Minister for Justice to the Magistrate of a Court of Inquiry the power to direct that proceedings be taken against any person for commit" ting irregularities in connection with a poll. The third reading has been set down for Tuesday. The Hon. Mr Bolt has given notice to move the recommittal of the bill, in order to reconsider the clause. He intends to propose an amendment that the.clubs' bars shall close from 11 p.m. until 6 a.m on week days, and from 11 p,m. on Saturdays until 6 a.m. on Mondays.

A DIBFKRENCE OF OPINION.—Thus Christehureh Truth:—Bishop Neligan has broken out in a place that will prove a great shock to his cousin of Christchuroh when he gets back. While the local prelate has been sool ing on the "no-license" brigade with vigor, and activity, and zeal for years, now, the Auckland episcopal dignitary has just announced that ho has had fair opportunities of estimating the character of many of the hotelkeepers in the country, and be concludes with great deflniteness that—" Some of the sanest temperance reformers and best friends of real temperance are to be found in the ranks of the men who own or manage some of the hotels." A large number of persons who have taken their cue from the no-license Bishop will find great difficulty in reconciling the views of these two prelates. The only thing for them to do is to strike an average and decide that, as one Bishop favors no license and the other essentially doesn't, matters are as you were. Anyhow, if the no license party don't agree with Bishop Neligan, they have no right to hurl Bishop Julius at i the public's head.

Early Closing.—Now and then (says the Wellington Post) a deputation says funny things in the ardour of its advocacy of what it wants. One eloquent member of a shops and offices deputation, which waited on the Premier on Monday, spoke with some heat of the small shopkeeper who keeps open after 6 p.m., and snares the late shopper. v Every toffee shop—every widow woman—every poor creature who has abie of a shop," replied the Premier, " should, according to your ideas, put up the shutters on 'the stroke of six o'clock." "This widow woman of yours," replied the deputationist with great heat and excitement, "this widow woman that you are always talking about, is spurious !" Tbe notion of a " spurious" widow sent the Premier into a wild fit of laughter, " Better marry her straight off," suggested Mr Duthie, with wicked frivolity

The Maori Tohunga. — In " The Maori Race," Mr Tregear gives an immense number of interesting stories, of which the following is quite apropos of the present against tohangaism. Bishop Selwyn, in bis great crusade against heath nism, visited that stout old pagan, Te Heuheu, of Lake Taupo, the last open adherent of the old gods among Maori notables. Quoth Te Heuheu: "If you are the messenger and priest of a god, show me a miracle, give me a sign as a credential." Answered our great bishop: " The sign of my religion is in the life of a man, in the changed and purified heart., I have no other sign to show." Up spoke Te Heuheu; "My priest here has power from his god to work wonders," and at his bidding the tohunga, Hnnuaho, picked up a brown and faded cabbage-palm leaf from the ground. Hunuaho flung it into the air, and " it wavered downwards to the earth, green as grass."

The Roberts of JAPAN.—FieIdMarshal Yamagata, who is said to have superseded General Nogi in the direction of the Japanese operations at Port Arthus, is one of the oldest and most famous of Japan's military commanders, and has been variously described as the Moltke and the hmd Roberts of the East. He is one of the men who wore "made" by the revolution of 1867, which restored the Mikado to power and overthrew the Sokugawa dynasty after a reign of two and a half centuries. Later he studied the art of war in Europe, and went through the whole of the Franco-German campaign. Yamagata must be added to the list of invalids who have accomplished work of epoch-making signifl< cance. For many years past his health has been poor, so that as often as not he has been unable to participate in person in the triumphs which his brain has planned. During the war with China, though he was credited with the direction of almost every battle that was fought, he waa never present in person at a single important engagement. None the less, he insisted on accompanying the army during the terrible campaign through Manchuria.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/MEX19041024.2.10

Bibliographic details

Marlborough Express, Marlborough Express, Volume XXXVII, Issue 235, 24 October 1904

Word Count
1,719

LOCAL & GENERAL NEWS. Marlborough Express, Volume XXXVII, Issue 235, 24 October 1904

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