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MAYORAL INSTALLATION.

A speoial meeting of the Borough Council was held m the Council Chambers yesterday for the purpose of installing the Mayor elect, Mr E. Purser. If here were present : His Worship the Mayor, Mr T, Horton, and Councillors McArtney, McCallum, Macey, (Jonolly, Trevor, and Jackson. The Returning Officer, Mr R. D. Nosworthy, wrote forwarding the result of the mayoral election held on November 25th, and declaring Mr Purser duly elected. tor Horton then said that this was the statutory meeting of the Council, as provided for by the " Municipal ( 'orporations Act," for the installation of Mayor. He was placed m rather a peculiar position, owing to the fact that he had contested the election with Mr Purser ; but he felt indebted to that gentleman fur the manner m which he had conducted the ►lection. ISpeahing for himself, he had had the honor of serving four terms m the Mayoral Chair, and during the whole of that time had experienced the greatest courtesy from the Councillors, and all de liberations had been carried, on with the greatest cordiality and with an entire absence of any ill feeling ; and nil decisions arrived at were, he hoped, for the benefit of the bur gesses. He was quito sure Mr (Continued on fourth page ) *

Purser was imbued with a desire to 1 'serve the burgesses, and he was < certain that Mr Purser would have ( the full support of the Oonncil m ( doiDg so. < Mr Purser than made the statu- , tory declaration and took his seat as j Mayor. •He thanked the late Mayor , and the Councillors very sincerely j for the kind reception they had extended to him on taking the ohair, and he assured them that his best efforts would be made to justify them | \ giving him their support and co« operation. He recognised the honor conferred upon him m presiding over a body of gentlemen such as the Council was composed of. He hoped that at the end of his term neither the dignity noT the honor of the Council would have suffered at his hands. He wished to contradict rumors that had been oiroulated to the effect that he was opposed to the conservation of the Baylor River. He said he was fully acquainted with the troubles that were threatening to seriously damage the best, part of Blenheim, and he fully recognised the importance of the difficulty being promptly dealt with, but the question of whose duty it was to carry out the work had always presented itself — whether it was the duty of the Lower Wai ran Kiver Board or the Borough Council. As a matter of equity he thought the River Board should get a private bill passed empowering them to extend their boundary, m order to inolude that part of the town which now urgently needed protection. He estimated the rental value of the properties m Maxwell Road and Pouthside (excluding Redwood Town) affected, at £3580 per annum ; this at a 6d river rate would produce £89 10s. It must, however, be borne m mind that this was the wealthiest part of the Borough and that it had been exempt from river rates from the inception of the River Board, 23 years ago, and had thus escaped a net sum of £2058 10s, or on the present rate £41 17, which would more than cover the work proposed. In justice to the, other wards he thought th?s portion of the Borough should bear its fair burden for river protection. He considered that both the Council and. River board acted wisely m acquiring parts of Sections 5 and 6, Omaka, as they were now m a position to lead the river with a view of doing the greatest good to the greatest number. As a matter of expediency it might happen that the Council (pending the River Board ©xtendingits boundary) would deem it necessary to immediately face th» difficulty, not only m order to protect Maxwell Road and Southside, but perhaps the town. Some people held an idea that the Mayor could do all manner of things. He recognised that he could not do anything, nor did he wish to, without the support of the Councillors, but would mention a few . things whioh he should . like to see caxried out. In the first place he would like to see the major portion of the streets named and iron plates affixed, and it was his intention to offer to supply the plates and writing at his own expense if the Council would pay the cost of erecting them. He was ot opinion that the Council should liberally support the Fire Brigade, as every ratepayer benefited by its efficiency. It was also his intention, at an early date, to submit a scheme for a water tower, by which not only would the present hydrants be always charged, but the overflow could be utilised at the Rotunda m the Square, for the benefit of both man and beast, by the provision of a fountain and drinking troughs. His scheme would not encroach on the present Borough .funds, as he proposed to ask the inner area ratepayers to continue the sixpenny fire rate, which they were now paying, for another two years, - and m his opinion that would pro vide ample funds for the scheme he proposed to lay before the Council. He would also like, if possible, that the Borough Inspector should make such alterations m the working houm of the Borough workmen, that while sot working a less number of hours per week, they would be enabled to nave a weekly half holiday. He again thanked the Councillors for their kind reception, and assured them that his best efforts would be expended m the service of the Borough. Councillor MoArtney, as senior Councillor, welcomed and congratulated Mr Purser on his election, and assured him that the Councillors would be ever ready to extend him the same courtesy as his predecessor m office had experienced. Mr Purser thanked him for his kind remarks, and hoped he would be as worthy an occupant of the Mayoral Chair as Mr Horton had been. Mr McCallum also welcomed the new Mayor, and m the course of his remarks said that although the Mayor was only an individual, often he was the executive officer of the Borough, and the office was one of dignity and importance, and he was sure Mr Purser fully recognised the importance of the office. He would have many duties and functions to attend to, and while the Council would be very glad to accept Mr Purser's generous offer, he thought the calls on the Mayor's time should be quite sufficient without making demands on his purse too. His Worship's remarks re works would be discussed by the Council at the proper time, but with regard to the Taylor River protective works he would point out that the localities of Maxwell Road and Southside did not cause such a drain on the Borough finances as those portions of the town below flood level. The water-tower scheme had been discussed on several occasions, but the main trouble was that, the more the Council did for the benefit of the insurance companies the less were the -benefits received ' by the burgesses from the companies. As a body of men the Fire Brigade were very efficient, and very reasonable m their demands, and the Council was at all timed ready to accede to them. In conclusion he would call his Worship'a attention to the Marlborough Club drainage. The Inepeotor of Tsuisanceß had told him a very grave nuisance did exist, and he hoped his Worship would take the first opportunity of dealing with it. A resolution had been passed, m all sincerity, for the commencement of proceedings against the Club, but for some reason there had been considerable delay. He trusted his Worship would enquire into the reason and take early steps to remedy the nuisance, He felt sure the

Mariborough Olub were not desirous of contravening the bye-laws. His Worship said that by an over* sight he omitted to mention that he deeired to see, if possible, all the open drains m this Borough done away with, and drain pipes substituted m their stead. This would, he thought, remedy the evil. The matter would have his earnest attention.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/MEX18971216.2.32

Bibliographic details

MAYORAL INSTALLATION., Marlborough Express, Volume XXXII, Issue 276, 16 December 1897

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MAYORAL INSTALLATION. Marlborough Express, Volume XXXII, Issue 276, 16 December 1897

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