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Published Eveby Evening. SATURDAY, MAY 27, JLB93. LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS.

The Wbatheb. — Captain Edwin wires at 11.50 a.m. as follows :— " Indications for frost to-night, and for low tides." Religioob.— The Rev Mr Elliot, of Wei. lington, is to preach morning and evening at St. Andrew's Church to-morrow. Pbesonal. — A private latter from Mr S. J. Maoalister, dated from Raratonga, May Bth, gives a glowing account of the islands. Taxation. — It is understood (says the Poat) than an amendment to«the Land and Income Tax Bill will be introduced next session, removing the taxation from improvements. The Tariff — Government will make no attempt to alter the tariff during the present Parliament. Any meddling with it, it is felt, would be too large aD order for a final session. Films' Cibcus. —The thoroughbred horse Viotory, the property ,of Mr F. N. Jonea, of Nelson, hat been purohased by Mr Fillis for circus purposes. The price paid was 100 guineas. Land Sale.— lt has been deoided by the owners to sell Moorland's farm m one block, not sub-divided as currenty reported. Mr J. Paul, of Wanganui, is here at present m connection with the business, and further particulars will be made known at an early date. Bcott's Send Off.— Thus Thursday's Post : — The executioner of Scott was amongst the batch of drunkards brought up at the Magistrate* Court this morning. He said he was an old soldier, and had been drinking the Queen's health. At the Police Station he openly boasted that Scott was by no means the firat man for whom he had performed tha " happy despatch." Presbyterian Concert.— The Presbyterian Schoolroom was filled to the doors last night on the occasion of the concert m aid of the Sunday School funds. A firat class programme was presented, and tha different items went off most successfully. Mrs McCallum was encored, and several of the other pßrformsrs loudly and enthusiastically applauded. The school children under Mr Cheek did very well, and the " See-Saw " chorus was particularly good. Two of the juvenile performers Mast«r Earnest Hay on the piano and Master Roy Simson for his song " Home Boys Home," came m for their share of applause, as also did Miss Elbeck, a promising young pianiste, Mr Cheek, and Misses Hutcheson an I Simson played the accompaniments. Ws ought to say that tho stage had been very nicely decorated for the occasion. Many forget that the hair and scalp need cleansing. Extensive use of Ayer's Hair Vigor haa proven that it is the best cleansing agent for the hair— that it prevents dandruff and stimulates the hair to renewed growth,

The Wanganui Election.— One aooount says that Mr Parsons has been drivan out of the contest by the prohibition vote whioh would be oast against him because (so the story tubs) he ia the owner of some hotel property m the town. Mr Willis is now to the fore, because he has the labor vote m his favor. Of course all this is a great help to the Opposition candidate (Mr Carson). The wires are being pulled, aa I intimated, by persons outside the antagonist political parties. In a contest of this description the result follows after a serieß of surprises, bo that nothing certain can be known until the " numbers are up." — New Zealand Herald Special. Football.— At the special general meeting held last night, the date of the visit to Nelson was fixed for the 24th of June, and m order to allow of practioe matches the fixtures for the 10th and 17th of June were postponed. Messrs Marshall, W. Baillie, L. Griffiths, and H. Robinson were recommended to the selection oommittee of the N.Z. Rugby Union as fit candidates for a N.Z. representative team. Mr R. M. Harding offered a silver medal for the seniors, and a vote of thanks was aocorded him. The following resolution was also carried : —This Union upholds Mr Ellison's motion with reference non-affiliated Clubs, but at the same time this Union would have liked to see the affiliation of Unions brought about by friendly intercession rather than by stringent measures. Refereesfor to-day's matches were appointed, and the meeting then adjourned. Obituary.— lt is with very great regrot that we hays to record the death this morning of Mr George Ri!«y, at the residence of Mr J. MoHattie. Mr Riley had been suffering for some time past from heart disease, and for the last few days had been staying m town. It was about the year 1875 that the deceased took over the stables now oonducted by Mr Bax, and m that line he remained till 1889. During the years 1888 and 1889 he was Mayor of Blenheim, and no more popular occupant of the chair has there been. After leaving the stables, Mr Rilsy occupied a farm on the Renwickßoad, and eventually took up land m the Pelorus Sound. The roughing of a pioneer settler's | life, however, was too muoh for a not over robust constitution, and a genial kindly spirit has given up life's struggles and gone to his rest. The bereaved family will have the sincere aympathy of a large portion of the community, by whom the deceased was deservedly respeoted. The funeral will take place on Tuesday. j Blenheim School Committee. — At the meeting last night there were present all but Mr Harris, who, through illness, was unfortunately absent. After the minutes of the previous meeting had been confirmed, the inward and outward correspondence was read, the latter being approved of. Tha Secretary reported that, m accord with the wishes of the Committee expressed at the last meeting, he had placed the matter of absentees m the hands of the police, and they had done all that was possible as far as they were concerned. Mr Lucas reported that the roll number for the boys school was 190, and the average attendance for the month 163 ; and for the infants, 277 on the roll, with an average of 209. ftliss Morgan reported 191 on the roll, and 144 of an average ; she also sent ia the names of several who had been absent from school, and it waa reaolvei that their names, after the ages had been ascertained, Bhould be given to the police. In accordance with a notice of motion, Mr Purser moved that the Inspeotor be requested to hold surprise inspections, as the present Byßtem did not give a reflex of the knowledge of the pupils. In speaking to the motion Mr Purser spoke of the cramming that was going on under the present system, towhieh parents were very much disinolined. They did not care whether their children had 90 per cent or 70. Parents did not attach the same value to these per centagea as Inspectors. He would like to Fee the Blenheim^chools the firat examined m the district^Mr Wilkinson seconded the motion pro forma and m doing so differed m almost every depree especially pointing out that ifc would bo very unfair to the Blenheim schools to be examined at a lesser interval than country schools. Mr Tunnicliffe having spoken against the motion, and Mr Green having opposed it on the* ground that the Inspector was the servant .o| tb.p (PlSlr 1 M~-fu'rser repYAft? jKia y the motion was declared lost. The question of midwinter holidays was next discusßO.l when it was resolved to grant two weeks, the date to be left to the head master and head mistress, with whom the Chairman and Secretary are to confer. On behalf of the Visiting Committee Messrs Wilkinson and Cross reported that they had visited the schools with Mr Harris The attendance was not what might have been wished, but with the goneral surroundings of the school they were on the whole eatisfied. It was resolved that the ouatodian be instructed that dusters as well as towels are inoluded m the washing contract, and on the motion of Mr Wilkinson it was decided that tha approach to the Girls' School, where m wet weather a pool of water exists, shall bo filled m at the expense of the Committee, and not of the Board. After passing a few accounts the Committee adjourned.

Sir C. Dilke. — If at the present time the Cup of Lif9 contains aught of bitterness for the spook stricken Stead, it must be found m tha gradual but sure reinstating of Sir Charles Dilke to his old position m the House— a position he held before the neverto be-forgotten Crawford case, not by virtue of oratorical ability, but by reason of an almost encyclopedic Knowledge of facts, figures and minute details concerning matters brought before Parliament. Sir Charles is one of those men who seem to posseaa no interest m life outside politics. He has wealth, a maoy-sided intelligence, physical capacity of no mean order — j n fact everything necessary to the proper erijoyraant of life, and yet, for the sake of a seat m Parliament, hs has endured for seven long years the most virulent abuse the eplenetio Stead could pour out on him. There are traces m Sir Charles' face of the mental suffering through which he has passed, but m many respects he looks younger to-day than he did when a Cabinet Minister. He has lost the deadly pallor, the leok of fag and weariness, and to a certain sxtent the shiftiness of expression whioh, when m office, repelled many people. Sir Charles has taken up the broken thread of hie political life just as if nothing bad ocourred m that long period of exile. He is never out of his place; attends every sitting as conscientiously aa though he were m office and responsible for eveiything that is geing on. He never talks unless he knows his subject, and the House appreciates him for that virtue.— London correspondent. " Labby " on the Parsons. — Labouchere, m keelhauling a parson for having refused to read the prayers over some unfortunate or other, remarked that the prayers wera not so muoh for the dead as for the living, and that, m fact, by the time the burial service is performed the destination of the deceased ia J' deoided and reached." This deol&ration of " L*bby " has brought upon him no end of danuaciation. The paragraph m whioh he deals with his correspondents ia delicious. In the course of it he says : — •' I quite thought that everybody was agreed about this, or I would not for the world have broached the subject. In face of the warmth with which one or two correspondents address me, I cannot think of pursuing such, a dangerous topic. One gentleman, however, who appears to be merely a philosophic seeker after truth, remarka that he always finds I make statements on good information, and he wishes to know what information I have on this particular subject. It is a painful thing to destroy an illusion, especially an illusion about one's self, but I am sorry to say that I have no private information regarding the ultimate destination of the soul which has left its earthly tenement. Judging, however, from the general tenor of the correspondence which I have received, many other persons are m possession of the fullest and moat detailed particulars." Adrift on the Ocean.— The Morning Star mission vessel reached Honolulu just before the mail steamer Alameda sailed, with a story of suffering and endurance on the ocean which has probably never been paralleled. A family party of four natives of Tapitua, one of the Gilbert Group, comprising a father, two sons, and a daughter, went out fishing from that island m a canoe one night. The wind came on to blow hard, and the canoe drifted out of sight of the island. Day followed night and night the day, but the canoe and its occupants were every hour carried further from the home beach. Their sufferings were intense. They had neither food nor water m the frail shell, while for forty days they drifted over the trackless waste of water. Three of the four were alive when, at the expiration of that terrible forty days, the canoe was beached at Ocean Island, and one of the boy 3 had perished since,

FLAxm-Mr Bobert Gardiner, of Paiaka, sends tlraTew Zealand Times the following : — I havß'been making some experiments with thelgaseoomb or hackle scutcher ani the beateftsoutcher, the results of whioh as they prefl'nt themselves to me may be of interest to flaxmillers generally. These two kinds of scutcher I have erected side by side. Two of the best workmen, each accustomed to his own machine, were obtained. Mr Joseph Thompson, of the Wairarapa, took the one, and Mr Hudson of Paiaka, the other. Let me premise the green blades were stripped for both by one of Booth and McDonald's strippers, and paddooked m the usual untied manner. To Thompson, the hackle scutcher, for example, I gave 1361 b dry fibre, from which he produced 771 b dressed, excellent m quality, or at a los 3of 39 per cent. This he did m 39 minutes, or at the rate of 1 ton m 18£ hours. From the same haap of fibre and of exactly the same quality I gave to Hudson 2381 b; he produced 1741 b, or at a loss of 27 per cent, m 62 minutes, or 1 ton m 13J hours. Hudson was certainly more distressed with hia work than Thompson. The difference between the two was 12 per cent, or 2cwt lqr 161 b per ton. Taking this difference at, say, 17s per cwt, means 40s, to which must be added the cost of green flax, cutting, carting, milling, paddocking and extra time, m all 693 per ton. Then there is the actual difference m cost to the miller. Exception may be taken to the percentage of loss, but it comes out about the same after many tests under the same conditions. It would be lesß were the leaves sorted and the tails cut off, but then before the fibre comes to the scutcher the difference between my figures and what I have found under the latter circumstances ha 3 been made. Now to the buyer, is hackled scutched flax worth the difference m its cost to the miller ? So far I am of opinion it is not.

CoMiiEßciiL Protection. — A correspondent writing on the subject of " Commercial Protection," to the Auckland Star, says he considers that some amendment of the law is required to cope with levanting debtors. He says : — " Defaulting lawyers, swindling merchants, dishonest clerks etc., and others too numerous to mention, take saloon passages and depart without the slightest interruption. In some American colonies, I am told, where regular steamers ply to and fro, a man cannot leave the town without a permit, and with & single charge against him he will be detained, Sarely something could be done to improve this sad state of things m Auokland, or it will finally prove to be most disastrous to the commercial portion of our cities." A Costl* Quarrel, — Somo very strange stories are current as to the quarrel which has not improbably cost Mrs Langtry the late Abington Baird'e fortune. On dit the Squire went to see the Lily one evening m liquor and, m the presence of several persons, cast very serious aspersions on her character. A row royal set m, which ended m Mr Baird being removed, and Mrs Langtry (no doubt accidentally) getting a black eye. The lady was furious, solicitors were called m, and a polioe court oase threatened. A money salve settled the black eye, but Baird was barred out of the house he had given Mrs Langtry, and never saw her again. When m America, he Bent Mr Barnard Abrahams to treat for forgiveness. Mrs Langtry, doubtless, rejoices sha sent a dignified but not unfriendly answer. Centralisation of Trade. — The New Zealand Trade Review publishes some interesting figures showing how trade m oertain lines ig centreing- m Wellington. During the year 1892, 3274 barrels of cement were imported to Auckland, 10,515 to Lyttelton, and 9698 to Dunedin, while to Wellington the number was 17,609. The import of corrugated iron was to Auckland 20,753 cwt,, to Lyttelton 21,490 cwt., and to Dunedin 26,064 cwt., while to Wellington there came 50,873 cwt. The quantity of fencing wire was— Auokland 25,948 owt., Lyttelton 24,211 cwt., Dunedin 37,378 cwt., and Wellington 65,709 cwt. Thase are all heavy goods, and no doubt (remarks the Post) the superior advantages which this port possesses for handling and distributing them accounts m a large degree for the figures we have quoted.

Irish Village at Chicago. — The CoanteßS Sx Aberdeen is'iki3sy engaged in-pswssJsg-the costume 3 which are to be worn by the female representatives of Erin m the Irish village. The dresses, which are being prepared m Dublin, will represent tho3o worn by the peasantry m various districts, for the national costurno-ia not as unvarying aa it is represented to be m the pictures of Irish country life, which are associated with existence m the Emeiald. Isle. The principal styles of dress will be those of Donnegal, Munster and Connaught. Theee garments will be of Irish material and the workers by whose hands they will be fashioned will all be Irish people.

Labour Colon?. — A schema for a • labour colony' has been devised m Victoria. It i 3 hoped that subscriptions to the amount of £10,000 will be raised for its establishment, and the Government have promised a subsidy of pound for pound. Tha Government is to reserve and vest m trustees certain blocks of land suitable for the purpose. On these lands, with the money now to be subscribed, there will be erected bouses, cottages, tents, and workshops. There will be lands laid out m gardens plantations and farms, all under competent management. Any man m the colony out of work and m want of food and shelter will beat liberty to go to this 'labour colony,' and receive keep and covering m return for the work he will do there. Musical Criticisms.— The following, says the Melbourne Age, may be recommended to the notice of musioal oritio? m search of new and striking phraees ; they are warranted genuine, and strictly up to date : — ' Mrs Taggart found full scope for her soprano propensities m a reoitative entitled, 1 &?. A certain artist ' well breasted the exaotions on the voico of Meyerbeer's Roberts tuche Adoro.' An American journal, commenting on a vocalist singing ' earnestly with judgment and good taste, 1 somewhat mars the effect of this commendation by the addition that ha ' manages skilfully, save for a tendency to wander from the key.' We shall next hear of a soldier who fought bravely, though he exhibited a disposition to run away. The " Unemployed." — A correspondent of the Hawera Star writes : — The " unemployed " are making good progress with the East road through the frlang^ere and Pohokura blocks. They have got several miles felled, and the roadway cleared of timber well up into the Pohokura, and are now taking the earthwork m hand. It is said that high sohedule prices are being paid them, and no doubt they will want all they make. It is to be hoped that some of them will settle down to a country life instead of drifting baok into cities. If they do settle down it will ba a good thing for all concerned, hut if not it will be very unfortunate. Autumn Season, 1893.— Smale and Hay, London House, are now opening their first shipments of new winter goods, consisting of mantles, jackets, cloaks, ulsters, furs, all the latest designs imported direct from the manufacturers. Mens' and boys' clothing knic suits and mercery, the best value m the market, Eoslyn wools, flannels, blankets and hosiery. Tailoring and dressmaking orders executed on the shortest notice, fit end value guaranteed. — Smalb & Hay, London House. The New Zealand Clothing Faotory have successfully run the Wertheim Sewing Machine since starting here. Customers are pleased with the machine, and satisfied with the firm with whom they have done business; and especially m buying a sewing machine customers want to know they are doing business with a steady firm who are not likely to be here to-day and away to-morrow. So try the New Zealand Clothing Factory for. a good [sewing machine, Mahomet said — " The ink of the wise is worth more than the blood of martyrs." Perhaps all do not agree with this ; but everyone acknowledges that Crease's a.l Coffee when once tried is always used. Can it be true, but you can buy them for this week only, the new ladies' ulsters, with three-quarter cape detaphed, either with Watteau back, or silk lined hoods, m the new Mikado, Dorothy, and Patience makes, tailor made, and well finished. These are a lot of manufacturers' samples we are selling under wholesale oost at 163 6d, 183 63, and 20s, never sold m the ordinary way under 40a. Be sure and see them, as they are going fast, at R. Allan's. Not to Know is Not to Have, but once having used Sun Baking Powder you will never be without it, for it is the best m the market, both for purity and price. Sold everywhere^

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Bibliographic details

Marlborough Express, Marlborough Express, Volume XXIX, Issue 132, 27 May 1893

Word Count
3,529

Published Eveby Evening. SATURDAY, MAY 27, JLB93. LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS. Marlborough Express, Volume XXIX, Issue 132, 27 May 1893

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