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LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS.

diseases,

New Goods. — Mrs Winstanley has just received some new goods. Particulars are given m an advertisement.

Pioion Whaep.— His Worship the Mayor informs us that he has not yet received any official information from Picton as to the meeting re. the extension of wharf accommodation. Seeing that the matter is one that requires immediate attention we hope the Picton Borough Council's resolution will be carried into effect as soon as possible..-|^^ ■". .^jwjo/j ../Hijrtßß

Cooking v Stoves.— -Mr W. Carr has been appointed agent for Shacklock's celebrated Oripn cooking stoves. A large number of which are m use m New Zealand.

Salvation Abmy. — The Salvation Army authorities have decided to open meetings, m Picton, which are to be continued regularly. Captain Podmore and the brass band will make the first attack next Sunday m the Foresters' Hall.

Fbeezing Works.— Though no information is as yet available as to when Messrs Nelson Bros, intend to start building at Spring Creek, we are informed that they have had a surveyor over inspecting the site, and taking levels for the siding which will have to be put m, connecting the works with the railway line.

The English Derby.— The 111 th English Derby was run on the 27th m pouring rain. After going a mile, says a late cable, Gouverneur was m command, and kept the lead till quarter of a mile from home, when Common went up and won m a canter by two lengths m 2min 56 4-sth sees. Common belongs to Lord Allington, ancl'opened his career by winning the two thousand guineas.

Lincrusta- Walton. — We have been left some samples of this new and greatly improved wall covering, for which Mr Payne is local agent. From an artistic point of view the designs would be difficult to beat, from the economical the best, because they are everlasting, and can always be renovated at little expense, and from the sanitary they are immeasureably superior to ordinary wall papers, as they do not absorb disease germs with the same ease. Mr Payne will be pleased to accept orders from any who are contemplating building, or who wish to renovate their present dwellings.

School Committee. — At a meeting of the School Committee last night there were present Messrs Birch (Chairman), Fergusson, Buick, Rayner, Bythell, and Taylor. It was resolved to grant the use of the Infant schoolroom to the Orchestral Society for practice once a week, provided they made arrangements for cleaning and lighting. For the month the attendance returns were boys 291, girls 174; of the latter 33 had only attended half time, and it was resolved to send circulars ' to the parents on the matter. Mr Buick M.H.R., was granted leave of absence for the ensuing session of Parliament. Messrs Birch and Macey were appointed visiting committee for the month. After passing accounts amounting to £15 9s the Committee adjourned.

Judges Edwards and Ward. — It is true that two wrongs do not make a right, but all the san?e it is interesting just now to watch the different attitude assumed by the Opposition papers with respect to the preseni Government and the Edwards case, and the Atkinson Ministry and its treatment of Judge Ward. Though tbe Ballance Government are fighting for a great constitutional principle, they have hurled at them such epithets as " vindictive cruelty," ." repudiation and persecution," but when Judge Ward was hounded from the Bench at the instigation of a member of the previous Ministry, after he had served for some time, and when he was entitled to the right of reversion, and all because a client of a particular Minister had .been imprisoned, these same journals were silent as the tomb. We believe a wrong has been done Mr Edwards, but it was done him by the previous Government, and m the teeth of the opinion of those who now hold officeTimes have changed, and now the Conservative Press finds abuse the best weapon to hand.

Institute for the Blind. — Those of us who enjoy the most precious gift of Providence, sight, can feel for the unfortunate afflicted to whom this pleasure is denied, and for that reason shoMd subscribe, be it ever so little, to the Jubilee Institute for the Blind, lately opened m Auckland. We had the pleasure of an interview this morning with Mr Tighe, who is travelling the Colony m the interests of this institute. This gentleman, who is himself blind, is engaged m collecting blind children, with a view to taking them to Auckland, where they will be taught to read and write, and receive the ordinary elements of education, atter which they will be put to trades suitable for blind people. We have before us the report of the Institute, and judging by its" membership, and Jhe name 3 "of its committee and trustees it is founded on a substantial basis, and is likely to succeed. The name implies the nature of it 3 origin, and a more humane way of commemorating the jubilee of Queen Victoria it would be hard to find. We commend Mr Tighe's mission to the liberality of out readers.

-A Cricket Decision.— The following reply by the Canterbury Times to a query relative to the late cricketing dispute m Blenheim will be read with interest by members of the local clubs : — " Marlborough Cricketers' Association (Blenheim).— There cannot be any doubt that the Association acted quite equitably and according to their rules. The rules are very similar, to thoso of the Canterbury Cricket Association, and we take it here that the " tie" referred to does not mean a H tie" match, but a tie m the number of wins. The same rule has been m question m Canterbury before, and the word "tie" referred to was. always considered as bearing the meaning you have put to it, and no other. We are sorry rto learn that the Awaruas were ill advised enough to secede from the Association, as m our opinion they have, not " a leg <to stand on," and we hope soon to hear that good feeling is restored, and that nothing but that healthy rivalry which is so desirable an adjunct of the British game is extant." . .

New Zealand Apples.— The London Daily Telegraph says : — Extraordinary prices have been realised at publicauction m Covent Garden for the first arrivals of New Zealand apples, which were brought to London m excellent condition by the Tongarh'd; English apples are still on offer at from 2s to 10s per bushel, but these importations were sold by Messrs W. N. White and Co., at from 15s to 25s per bushel case, thus demonstrating tho extreme importance of and ultimate profit attaching to the production of prize quality fruit. Every apple leaving Papanui is wiped dry and clean, and wrapped m a separate paper before being packed; and an idea of the extent of the exportations may be obtained from the fact that m one district alone a consigner has purchased 5000 cases. This new industry is being watched with great interest both m the colony and m London.

Weslh Whisky.—" Gallant little Wales " has been exhibiting her gallantry m a new direction lately. Some short time ago a whisky distillery was started m the Principality. It Beemed to some a national reproach that the patriotic Welshman, who generally likes whsiky, should be compelled to imbibe alien whisky of Irish or Scots extraction, or else go without; now the reproach is wiped out. Welsh whisky is an accomplished fact, and the first-fruits of the Bala Still, m an artistically decorated sherry cask branded with hoops of nickel silver, have with due ceremony been presented to the Queen. Her Majesty has graciously consented to receive the present bat she has not given the Welsh Distillery Company a testimonal yet.

John Wesley.— One of the smartest utterances of the Wesley Centenary must be set down to the credit of the Rev. J. C. Wright, a Plymouth minister. The other evening he was tracing the gradual change m Wesley's opinions and refuting the claims of the High Church party. It reminded him, he said, of the story of a showman who was travelling m the North of England, and who announced John Wesley's skull among his exhibits. A Methodist woman visiting the show expressed a doubt as to its genuineness on the ground that it was so small. " I know it's small," replied the showman, " but you see it's John Wesley's skull when he was a boy." Accordingly, when they were told that John Wesley believed m Apostolical succession and baptismal regeneration, they should remember that that was John Wesley's skull when he wfcs a boy.

Chaplain and Jockey.— The Duobess of Montrose has a keen eye as to the good work of her servants. She pays her chaplain £100 a year an fl her jockey £1500. The chaplain should, when no racing is goiag on, swop billets with the jockey for a while and thus swell his stipend. It is to be hoped that the chaplain's worth will be better recognised m the next worid.

A New Departure.— At the laat meeting of the Otago Pharmaceutical Association it was finally deoidel that the chemists and druggists of Dunedin should become sellers of tea as a protest against grocers selling patent medicines. Three lines of tea (says $he GJobe) will be specially imported from Melbourne, and will be sold at coat price, or thereabouts. " The new will commence m about a fortnight.

The Missing Bbacelet. — An exchange says:— "The only Bon of the deceased lady, whose bracelet was missing from the Public Trust Office, is on his way from Sydney to look into the affairs of bis mother's estate. As his deceased mother was an English lady of good breeding, and prominent m English society, it is inferred that she had not been accustomed to wear two-and-sixpenny bracelets. The one looked for by the son is alleged to be gold, set with amethysts and onyxes, of which he has informed the police."

The Pbince of Wales. — It would be interesting to know what interest the Prince of Wales pays when he has to borrow money. I presume that he at least is as good as Rothschild, but I suspect he has to pay something m advance of bank rates. We have had a good deal lately m the cablegrams about the Prince of Wales' debts. A friend has been looking up the income of the Prince, and finds that it amounts, for himself, wife, and family, to somewhere about £125,000 per annum. One would think a man could hardly get trough so much ; but the Prince is a good-natured fellow, and is addicted to various expensive pleasures. A Conservative paper received by last mail puts down his labilities at " a million of money !" It urges him to apply to the House for a vote as soon as possible, and says : — " Beyond a few incoherent shrieks from the ultraLiberals, the Irish, and the Radicals and Socialists there can be little doubt that the orthodox and sensible elements m the Commons would willingly vote to extricate him from his undignified position." Perhaps the Commons might tell him that, as an example to the Empire, and especially to New Zealand, he ought to learn to live within his income.

Pbofessor Pboctob's Neglected Gbave. — In one of the obscure plots m Greenwood Cemetery lie the remains of that gifted scientist, Bichard A. Proctor, the astronomer, says the New York Mail and Express. He died of yellow fever, and his body was, m consequence, indecently hurried into the ground. There were do fiiends to. drop a tear on his coffin. The only persons present were the undertaker and his men. The grave was quickly closed up, and to-day it is m a disgraceful condition. It is covered by a tangle of weeds and bits of old refuse that the high winds have scattered. No loviug hand has planted a rosebud there, and the . great man's last resting-place is sadly neglected. His widow and_ family have had a hard time of it since his deatb. The deceased left no fortune, and Mr 3 Proctor was forced to battle for bread for for herself and little ones. She tried many things, but without much success. Fortune refused to smile on her. Finally she went on the lecture platform, and delivered some of her husband's famous lectures, m the hope that 'she might make enough money to feed and clothe her children, and have her husband's remains taken back to his boyhood home m England. But m this she failed also, and m the meantime the grave is covered with debris, and there is no stone to mark the spot.

These is one thing every house-wife should know, and that is that Hercules Baking Powder is the best. Why ? It is the cheapest because the Best for making breads, pastry, cakes, puddings, scones, &c. Beautifully light and wholesome. In Gd and Is tins. From all grocers.

It is a good rule to accepts only suoh medicines .as are worthy of confidence. It has been the experience of thousands that Ayer's Cherry Pectoral is the best medicine ever used for throat and lung

Persons of Delicate Constitution, who are obliged to abstain from ordinary Coffee, should try Creases Taraxacum or Dandelion Coffee, which is recommended by medical authorities as a very valuable beverage for persons who suffer from weak digestion, flatulency, and nervousness. Sold m lib and Jib tins, Is and 2s.

We have an unrivalled stock of ladies underlinen m night-dresses, chemises, drawers, combinations, and all our garments are guaranteed to be either lock stitched or hand sewn, and include such popular makes as the "Hibernia" and " Stirling" at Te Aro House, Wellington.

Thbee Centuries have rolled, by since Baoon said " Coffee . comforteth the brain and heart, and helpeth digestion." Use Cheat's A. l. Coetee. Sold only m lib and 21b tins.

Ladies m the country desirous of know ing the best place to purchase undercloth ing and baby-linen should at once communicate their wants to Te Aro House, Wellington,

We have also an excellent assortment of ladies undervests m merino wool, natural wool and silk. All orders will be promptly executed, and when cash is sent with the orders, -will be sent carriage paid to any address, from Te Aro House, Wellington.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/MEX18910530.2.7

Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS., Marlborough Express, Volume XXVII, Issue 116, 30 May 1891

Word Count
2,395

LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS. Marlborough Express, Volume XXVII, Issue 116, 30 May 1891

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