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THE DECLARATION.

The official declaration of the poll was made at noon to-day by the Returning Officer, Mr W. Stuart, .

The returns were the same as published by as on Saturday last, and gave a total of 550 for Mr Dodson. and 381 for Mr Seymour, leaving Mr Dodson a majority of 169. Mr Dodson, who was loudly applauded, said lie ha 1 only, now, to briefly return thanks to his' supporters for the 'very substantial majority they had given him. The majority was one which would justify him iv speaking and acting on behalf of the district, as he felt that he did m reality represent it. So far as Mr Seymour and himself were concerned the contest might be said fairly enough to have been conducted with moderation. They had said nothing of one another of a peraoral nature that might not have been said at their respective dinner-tables. Mr Seymour had been their member for nearly II years. Curing that time he bad frequently met him m Wellington on public business, and although he bad never voted for Mr Seymour—had, m fact, opposed him— it was only right to say that Mr Seymour, (hiring these interviews, never let him feel that he remembered the opposition he had always received from him, but had always met him as frankly and gentlemanly as if he had been one of his supporters. This part of Mr Seymour's conduct was worthy of commendajkion, and he would endeavor to pursue the same line and be the representative of the District as a whole, not merely of those who had put him m. He claimed to have many rnnholders who voted for him, but it must b« admitted he had bat s limited knowledge of the busioesß appertaining to the runholding interests. If the rnnholders, however, would confer with him from time to time, and inform him of their requirements, he would endeavour to represent them to the beet of his ability. He thanked his committee and those who worked so zealously for him m town »od country, and hoped he would not disappoint the expectations formed of him. He need only further siy be would endeavor to fnlfU all promises he had made, particularly those made to our Catholic fellowsuhjeuts, aud he felt sure he had not a Protestant supporter but wished him to keep all those promises to the very letter (applause).

Mr A. P. Seymour, who was applauded on rising said, " Though it was now his turn to a<l<lre*B them, he bad hoped that he would have been able to speak first as on former occasions. It now only rein lined for him to briefly and heartily ttnnk all his supporters m the late contest, his committee) scrutineers messengers, aud all others who bad done their work |so well anil gratuitously. "With reference to the result of the contest he was a little disappointed. It was a substantial defeat and even now hn could not und»ratand . bow it had taken place. .Some of it was due without donot to misrepresentations of the past. That he oould live down, And felt that, sooner or later, people woul.l Kud that be had done his duty towards them as their representative. The dtfent must also be ascribed to a love of change iuhereut m men. As time passed <>v the Rime love of change might come up a^iiiu, >i?>l he might be wanted once more. His defeat waß unt altogether without some situfaction when bo looked back upon the long periou he had served them, and the hard work he bad undergone, During a good deal of the time he was iv Parliament be had oueapicd the position of Chairman of Committees, and thought it probable that if he had been returned he would have occupied it ugain. During the last Parliament he had found his labors m tliat ollice very severe, so he did not look oo his retirement as a bad thing. It would be of benefit to his health, and would pnable him to attend to his own private affaire, which -the jiresßure-diiis pahlk duties

had caused him somewhat to neglect. It was aome satisfaction to see that m .the late contest a considerable number otquati leaders of party weie thrown but. It was his firm conviction that the Hall Government would have a good working majority to meet the new House with. He hoped Mr Dodson would f nlfil such promises he had made, and give them (the electors) every satisfaction. Mr Dodson moved a vote of thanks to the Returning officer, and thanked- him for the, complete and careful manner m which the' arrangements for the election were earned out. [ Mr Seymour seconded the motiou, and tbe ! proceedings terminated .

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/MEX18811215.2.6

Bibliographic details

THE DECLARATION., Marlborough Express, Volume XVI, Issue 292, 15 December 1881

Word Count
791

THE DECLARATION. Marlborough Express, Volume XVI, Issue 292, 15 December 1881

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