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RETURN OF MR SEYMOUR.

Yesterday afternoon, notwithstanding tre sudden and unpleasant change m the weather, a large number of person? assembled afc tie o;>;t\va Railway Station to welcome His Honor M' Seymour on liis return from Europe, /s t'le train advanced the colours of Old-Eughi d were setn fluttering on. the engine, and he,<-1y cheers greeted the arrival of the fain. Mr Hodson. Deputy Superintendent, Mr Goulter, Provincial Secretary, Mr John T. Robinson, and several members of the Reception Committee, met Mr Seymour on the platform, and accompanied him to the carriage which was m waiting. As soon as the carriage was fairly started three 01 four horsemen cantered to the front and 1 jtl the cortege into Blenheim ; a long line of traps s.n-1 carriages of various descriptions, and a number of horsemen bringing up the rear, The avant couriers filed off on arriving at the Government Buildings, at the door of which the carringe with Mr Seymour and his friends almost immediately pulled up. As soon as Mr Seymour put liis feet on terra firma the signal was given, and three hearty ringing cheers told him there were English hearts m Blenheim, as well as m the land he had left behind. His Honor briefly but feelingly thanked them for the hearty welcome he had received, and retired to his 'room with the members of the Executive. During his retirement we may venture to say a few ■words about the general appearance of the town. Across High-street, from the Bank of New Zeal mil to the Podt-nfiicetwolines werestretched bearing a quantity of flags. A single live of flags was suspended across the other portion of High-

street, from Rohinson's to Lawrence's ; another across Market-street from Falconer's to Hoals' : s, and a third from Mark's to Hutcheson's at the enrl of the Omaka Bridge ; m addition to these, Hags were flying from the bell-tower and every flagstaff m the town, aud the greater part of the business houses were closed at 3 o'clock, m honor of the occasion. THE LUNCH. At length the hell summoned the assembly f o the festive board sit En-art's Hall, and ahoufclOO persons sat. down to a luucheon .most liberally provided, and placed upon the tables m excellent style' by Mr JohnEwart, assisted by Messrs Mason and Scott. Free play having been given to the knives and forks, and the meats having been removed, the Chairman, «Tas. E. Hodson, Esquire, proposed tho usual loyal to-tsts, which ■were dnly honored. He then said — '"Gentlemen, charge your glasses ; bnmpers this time." The appeal was quickly responded to, and as soon as 'Ir Horlson had pronounced the words — " I ask *-. to drink the wealth of Mr Seymour, our Suyott ndenfc " — th ere was such a burst of enpenntt. 'eheerijja that for several minutes the tnusias™. , vl to \va. : t for it to subside. As soon Chairman h. llimself heard) he said _ a ?r, t1 COU t f ''inlr ifc is " ot necessary for me '• Gentlemen. Itu . fmm the enthl , siastic to say anything jayj * fa toast (Lauabt way m winch yon rw«P v ]m& ]egg o and renewed a P pl^) x - eft here M Budde^ months ago, Mr Seymour » , r> r . oD i e ~ a :A as he had returned and a*t *J m^ £»£ ~ j ib was a shame to let surf* a ov the Superintendent of the Pi - without giving him a dnaer. 1 \ , . £"' that I would if possible enterta »jj »» «" »'» return, and for that reason,, and to 11 ™ J' m back amongst us, von have- been mv> ™ here to receive him. He Is well kr.-own to you »»,. and there is nothing I can pay tl iat can raw*, ("m m vonr eyr-s ; he is a man be.'oved by all l Cesses. In Wellington and Nelson the' question uas been •• Well, is Seymour liack?" I a>» happy to s^e him back, and I know what he wants is a hearty welcome and not a big dinner. (Cheers.) Had there been time to let the ou tlying districts know there would have been hundreds more there to receive him, I will n.it, however, detain you with a long speech, but wishing him j n long life and health and happiness, J propose the health of our worthy Superintendent, Mr Seymour. The toast was drank with musical honors, followed by loud cheers, and reivewed again and again for Mrs Seymour and tho firmilj'. Honor Mr Seymour rose t» repty, s, nd again there was such a storm of genuine enthusiasm as we have never before witnessed m th is Province. When the applause had subsided, 1 c said he was almost overpowered by the expcea - sions of regard. Ho thought no man ever ?ost -■ with grester satisfaction to return thnnks fortfue manner m which hia health had been drunk, amS he was equally surprised and gratified by the cordiality and kindess of his reception. It was not as though he had been home to conduct some? important public business, which he had brought to a successful conclusion. Ha had simply been to England for his own pleasure, and to recruit his health, and the expressions of goorl will which he had received were intensely gratifying. At Picton he had been most kindiy received, and at various places along the line he hasl! been greeted with shouts of welcome, j>.nd here they had made the walls echo, and the very floor dance with the enthusiasm of their reception. He went home as they knew to visit his father, who had arrived at a very old age. He had! the satisfaction of seeing his father once more, and of spending some time- m his society, the last he could hope for m this world. Reverting to his reception he said he doubted if any Superintendent could get a larger concourse m so small a community ; it was impossible for him to say how deeply he felt their kindness, when he found that even tho shops had been closed to make his welcome more manifest. -He said he had received every assistance from the other members of the Government before his, departurs, and he believed be was the first superintendent who had been to England and back and retained his office, and he* had every reason to think he would be the last. Ho hail enjoyed his trip amazingly, aud was very much pleased with what he seen, and he had gained some kuowledge, whiph he ho-ped . he would be able to use for their advantage m the future ; but mnch as he was pleased with what he had seen he was better pleased to retun.' to tho home of his adoption. His journey had been uneventful, but very swift, and he had travelled over a great many railways. He was happy to congratulate them on the completion of the Picton and Blenheim line, even as far as th>e Opawa River. It was very much pleasanter totravel as he had done to-day than toiling m a couch over wretchedly bad roads ; he thought great credit wns due to some people for the manner m which <hey lial m former years maintained the communication by coaches under great difficulties. (Hear hear. ) Some people thought that this line was a very indifferent one, hut it was very much lietfer th>n many h« had travelled on bekwet-h this anil Europe. The Him between San Fianci<C'i and New Yirk was not ballasted, where the line ran through a cutting the. stuff was thrown on between the sleepers ; if they passed over the soft virgin soil just such earth as was handy was used , sleepers m many places were thoroughly rotten, the spikes drawing out and stickiug up two or three inches as the train passed along. He then described a portion of the line "at a place called Black River, where the bank had been washed away by the rama and the ends of the sleepers were hanging over the ends of the precipice. He sat upon the outer step ef the car with his feet hanging over the river, while the traiu crept slowly along, for fear of shaking the rails, and all down the bank, m fact prolonging the agony. The railways m England were of course the very acme of railway engineering, (but nowhere else were they brought to the same perfection. The carriage accomodations were excellent m America, and the French railways were passable and m Switzerland the accomodation was very fair. From what he had seen, however, we had every reason to be satisfied with our own. In fact he came to this conclusion, tnat the more he saw the hetter he liked New Zealand. We talked about floo Is, and when one came upon us we spoke as though this was the only place tha! i.iiffered > he had not only heard but he had seer

the effect of some of the floods m the South of England, not only vast quantities of property destroyed, but lives were lost. The very train which conveyed the passengers to the ship m which he left England travelled for several miles through water four feet deep. In England, although m some parts farming was carried on upon the most scientific principles, yet they could not grow a good potato, he had not tasted a good one till he got to Melbourne ; he thought they could grow some good P»rown Rivers m Marlborough. With all the improvements m agriculture there were parts of England yet that were behind New Zealand, m fact a "century behind the age ; he had seen them making hay and tossing it about with a fork of the most primitive description cut from the hedge, and mowing the grass with scythes that were only fit to lash to the chariot of Queen Boadicea. Beef steaks were 14d per Ib, and though English beef was the perfection of meat, he had never tasted a mutton chop equal to those of New Zealand. When he was crossing the Rocky Mountains, they' brought him as a treat the flesh of the antelope and buffalo steaks, but he earnestly hoped he would never have to eat the like again. His experience reminded him so strongly of a line or two by the Latin poet Horace that he could not resist giving it to them ; freely translated into a sort of doggrel, it amounted to this — "Throughout the world there is no doubt, This little corner is out and oat." — (Laughter) His Honor concluded an amusing and interesting address by proposing m eulogistic terms the health of the chairman, Mr J. E. Hodson. Mr Seymour sat down amidst loud applause, which ' was renewed and continued for a considerable time, when Mr Hodson rose to thank them for the manner m which his health had beeu received. The toast had been drunk -with musical honors, and a cheer for the Mayoress. Mr Hodson's neat and appropriate speech brought to a close a very genial and pleasa.at meeting, of which the pressure on our time ai id space prevents us from giving a longer report.

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RETURN OF MR SEYMOUR., Marlborough Express, Volume XI, Issue 780, 15 January 1876

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RETURN OF MR SEYMOUR. Marlborough Express, Volume XI, Issue 780, 15 January 1876

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