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DUNEDIN NOTES.

(From Our Own Correspondent). June £2

It is v. very difficult at jthe moment to see any great measure pi stucco rs coming out of the World jLconionijC and Monetary Oonferenc© at present ■sitting' in London. It was hoped that America, under a new Preiddient and administration, and chastened toy the events of the past two years in that country, would give a lead at the conference. The; 'Speech tin ring the general debate at the conference toy Mr Cordell Hull (President Roosevelt’(3 chiel Minister) strengthened that idea. He it will toe remembered, that the whole price-ridden world was looking tio the Oonl'eronice for loaderisliip with a programme of basic reliefs, amdl the distressed people jn ■all lands expected concord, cooperation, and constructive results. Yet in spite of those to rave words America at the moment shows no willingness to co-operate toy making any concessions. It is generally 'admitted that currency stabilisation and tariff reductions' are of first importance to world recovery, tout the American delegates seem quite unable to give a lead in this direction. On the contrary they appear toe definitely opposed to proposals that have been put forward. Of course, the conference is in too early a sit age; yet to form conclusions as to its probable outcome. It is sincerely to toe hoped that America is not going to maintain her old isolationist ■attitude, and place her own interests first to the exclusion of world policy. The principal 'delegates of the leading countries have repeatedly said that the World Conference must not toe. allowed to fail, for if it did the result would toe disastrous. It is to be hoped that that thought will prevail. The Rugby competition has arrived at a very interesting stage. Southern are on top with 13 flag points. Then follow University A (12), Pirates. (12), Taieri (10), Kaikorai 10), Union (6), Zingari (6), Alhambra 6), Dunedin (2), and University B (12), It is refreshing to 1 see Taieri taking a conspicuous place again, reminiscent of the old days, when the Allans, the Gibsons, and others kept the team •well in the forefront. TaieuTs strength at present lies in a fine set of forwards. Union, too, after a'long spell pf ill-isiucceases, is coming into prominence once more, and its first fifteen is playing well. Union and Dunedin were the first two clubs established in Dunediiii, and it was many years before their supremacy was ’•challenged toy the establishment of ;new clubs. It was anticipated that there would too much distress in the cities of New Zealand during the coining winter. This was inevitable in view of the conditions that prevail. The general position shows signs of brightening, tout meanwhile much poverty and want exist. In addition to the heavy taxation for the relief of unemployment, an enormous amount has. been ■given privately in money .and goods in the past two years. Now another movement has been launched to meat urgent needs. A meeting was held at the Town Hall, at which Dean Oruicikishank said that the various charitable organisations connected with the churches, and other bodies were quite unable;, owing to lack of funds, to cope, with the situation. The Mayor (Rev. E. T. Oox), who presided, siaid it was estimated that 5000

[ people in the city were underfed and probably double, that number poorly clad land warmed. It is bard to 'believe that the position is as bad as this, tout undoubtedly there are large numbers' of thrifty and deserving who 'are under great stress as a consequence of unemployment. Add to this those who are not thrifty, and who are inefficient in their homes and extravagant in the use of money, and a very difficult position remains. The meeting resolved that an appeal for £IO,OOO should be made to the citizens, and a representative committee of 'business men and others was .appointed to arrange for the collection and administration of funds. Dunedin has; been unfortunate in its Harbour Board policy in the past. Opinions in the early days' were; divided as to the desirability of concentrating on Port Chalmers or of making suitable access to Dunedin for shipping. Prom the layman’s point of view it seem® a matter for regret that it was decided; to dlredige the Victoria Channel, an undertaking that coat a very large sum. At the time this work was put in hand it was hot realised that the size; of steamships would increase in the way that they have done. The result is that tiier channel is not of sufficient depth bo provide .accommodation for some of the heaviest laden and biggest vessels. :( t is considered now. that it would have been better to have concentrated on the lower harbour, providing facilities in berthing and loading to meet the developments!. It is not fair to blame past boards, for it is given to few to' be granted a vision of the future. The Bluff Harbour Board is trying to attract the fruit-export business of Central Otago. It offers, in the matter of export dues, to, charge an amount that is about half of what the Otago Board levies. The rail charges to the Bluff are higher, but allowing for that the favourable balance is with the latter port. It has been complained that the loading arrangements in Otago Harbour are not 'satisfactory. It remains with the Otago Board to try to meet the situation that has arisen, and discussions at the monthly meetings centre on this point, and improvements are being made in the Lower Harbour, but finance is the greatest difficulty. However, if Otago is to hold its oversea trade some way will have to be devised for meeting the requirements of the shipping companies.

The Otago University Council this week elected a chancellor to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Sir Thomas Sldey. As was expected, Mr W. J. Morrell, M A., was chosen. First elected to the. council in 1912, he became vice-chancellor in 1925, and has worked indetatigably in the interests of the university. Mr Morrell, who had a distinguished scholastic career at Oxford has been rector of the Otago Boys’ High School for twenty-six years. He is keenly interested in all educational movements, so that, considering his record all round his appointment is fully justified; and the University is lucky to have at its head a man with Mr Morrell’s qualifications. There was some speculation about the vicechancellorship. Mr Colin Gilray (head of McGlashan College and a former Rhodes scholar) was first proposed, tout declined nomination. Then Mx L. Deans Ritchie was nominated and elected without opposition. Air

Eitchie (who is a partner in a wellknown firm of laud and estate agents) was not educated at a university, hut he has been indefatigable as chairman oil' the Council’® finance committee and has well earned the honour bestowed l on him.

It is interesting to Look at the list of former chance Hons. It is not a very long one. The first was the Eev. Dr. Burns (who was known as the Aaron of the Otago settlement). Among the others were the Hew. Dr. Stuart, Sir Joshua Williams., Sir James Allen, and Dr. Andrew Cameron, who was succeeded by Sir Thomas Sidey. Sir James Allen is the only one ol the former chancellors now alive. Otago University, which began in a very small way, to-day affords facilities for a Large number of students. The students last year /numbered 1231 —864 men and 367 women. Seeing that there are. four university collegcisi in the Dominion we ought to be a highly educated people. Let us hope that with this spread of education we shall grow in wisdom. We need it.

In the days before Prohibition was tried in the United State® it was imagined by many people outside that rye whisky was the favourite drink. Judging from what one hearsi beeir is about asi popular there to-day among the people as it is* in England. A week or two ago it was announced in the commercial cables, from London that there was a keen demand in America for Canadian cheere —greater than the amount that could be supplied. When the law was relaxed thirsty Americans proceeded to quench their thirst in no uncertain way, and the demand was for bread and cheese along with the beer. It need not be inferred that the people are rushing to extremes and that drunkenness is rife in the country. There is no evidence of that, but it takes considerable catering to suddenly supply a demand in a country with a population of a hundred and twenty millions. The fact is that the swingover from “wet” to “dry” came with astonishing quickness following the Presidential election last November, and brewers and others were not prepared to meet it at once. The consequence it that large orders have been placed outside' the States.

According to a report in the 'Star’ Speight’s branch of New Zealand Breweries, Limited, was invited to brew 25,000 hogsheads for immedi.ate delivery to San Francisco, but the order could not be accepted, for 'Speed was the essence of tire contract, and such a big order could not be fulfilled at a moment’s notice. Another difficulty was that 8.2 per cent beer, to conform to the American law, was asked for, and jn<o> beer below 4.5 per cent is brewed in Dunedin. It seems a pity that Dunedin could mot have relieved the Americans of some of their dollars by this transaction, but the output of a brewery, like, other manufacturing concerns, is determined by the demand in normal times.

By the death of Mir William Laidlaw a familiar figure passes I from the Dunedin streets. He came to reside in this city about fifteen yeans ago after many years of toil. His period of retirement was well earned. He took no part in public affairs, but he was a consistent supporter of athletics and particularly Rugby football and boxing, and he was a spectator at most of the big events in these departments of sport. Mr La idlaw came to New Zealand nearly sixty years ago, and his working life was spent in Central Otago, his occupation being sheep farming. He gained experience with Messrs Murray, Roberts and Co. at their Ringway and Gladibrook stations', and then he acquired Matakanui Station, one of the biggest pastoral runs in Otago. He was a competent farmer, and a man of high personal character, and his hospitality .at Matakanui Avas proverbial. Among the runhoiders of the early days in the Central there were some outstanding characters. Mr Laidlaw was l one of them. There can be very few, if any, ef them, alive to-day. Names that are remembered among those who have passed over are jhosc of Mr Scobie Mackenzie, Mr William Burnett, Mr F. D. Belli, and Mr Watson Shemnan.

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Bibliographic details

DUNEDIN NOTES., Lake Wakatip Mail, Issue 4113, 27 June 1933

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1,808

DUNEDIN NOTES. Lake Wakatip Mail, Issue 4113, 27 June 1933

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