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SPORT IN BRITAIN

LONDON, January 28 EXCITING FOOTBALL.

France beat Scotl. 1 in a Rugby football match at Paris a few years ago, and repeated the performance this month. The performance did not attract any great attention, it being assumed that the visitors were haidlj at their best. Another view will have to be taken as to the strength of France in the Rugby world, as the visitors to Dublin on Saturday fairlj beat the Irish team on the latter s own soil. It was the speed of the Frenchmen in the three-quarter line which turned the scale, and the result has led to much discussion. Scotland, Wales, and Ireland have all lost their opening matches, whilst France has won both engagements so far. It looks as though it depends on England to prevent the international honours going to France lor the first time, and the task is going to prove difficult. Whilst it is recognised that it is for the good of the game that the honours shall go round, there is also a natural desire to see one ol the home teams prevail. England, by the way, will depend on the team which beat Wales when the match against Ireland at Dublin is played. (England won.) .. » f The manner the police force of Britain has advanced in sporting fray since the war is a matter for satisfaction. A team representing the English and Welsh force successfuly encountered the Army team at Newport on Saturday and had the satisfaction of beating the soldiers by 8 points to 3. Meanwhile, the Navy made a gallant fight against Blackheath, the latter winning by 10 points to 9. The ’Varsities both went under, Harlequins beating Cambridge, 19 points to 13, whilst London Scottish vanquished the Dark Blues by 12 points to 8.

ASSOCIATION CUP TIES. Remarkable scenes were the order at the big matches in the fourth round of the F.A. Cup Ties on Saturday No fewer than 74,600 people attended the Aston Villa v. Walsall tie, the receipts totalling £4,856. Over 50,000 spectators also paid £4,000 to see the Blackburn v. Everton fixture. _ The Arsenal v. Birmingham tie provided about the best struggle of the round. The home players showed splendid dash during the first half, and looked all over winners when leading by two goals to nil. A rearrangement of the Birmingham forward line at half-time led to the visitors making big improvement. It was their turn to" outplay their rivals during the second portion of the game, and amidst great excitement they put on two goah and so lived to play again. Villa, of course, had an easy task against Walsall (3-1), and Sheffield Wednesday, the league leaders, accomplished a smart win at Oldham (4-3). Huddersfield, at home, pleased the critics when beating their Sheffield United rivals (2-1), and Blackburn showed real cup-tie form when registering four goals against + he one by then visitors from Everton. West Ham made a good effort for the London clubs, a four goals to one success,- when at home to LeedsUnited, ranking as a fine performance.

A SMART ’CHASER. It seems that Gib must be classed with the best of the steeplechase horses in training. The gelding made light of 12st 71b in the Cranford Handi cap at Kempton on Saturday, and fencing splendidly, gained his seventh successive victory. He is the property of two London stockbrokers, and must have brought the joint owners a good picking in the ring. All being well. Gib will meet Easter Hero in the Cheltenham Gold Cup steeplechase, which will provide an opportunity oi finding out just how good he is. Being speedy a well as a clever fencer, Gib certainly ought to take high rank, foi he can carry a big impost and stil perform brilliantly. GOLF.

The lot of the selectors for any na tional team, whether for golf, cricket, football, or other pastime, is a hart one. To please everybody is impossible, and the gentlemen responsibly for picking the players to represent Britain against the United States golf crs for the Walker Cup matches oi May 15 have a stiff task, they art ten' in number, and all practical golf ers. -It may also bo claimed that eacl is desirous of picking the best possibly team. Nevertheless, already there is a growl because the North ol Englanc is not represented among the selectors Five of the selectors are Scots, and it might be claimed that this is out oi proportion, having regard to the fact that the population of England is about eight times greater. Golf is one ot the pastimes wind permit of trial matches which really do provide a true test. Thus it wouk be an excellent idea to promote font divisional trial competitions in tin north, south, and midlands of Lng\ land, and another in Scotland. Tin leading eight in each might then com pete in a further trial at Sandwich where the Walker Cup will be com petcd for. This method would revea which are the best players on tin course and on current form What n more, such trial matches would provi excellent practice for the players, am possibly bring a few new cracks to tin fore. ATHLETICS.

It is staggering to learn that tin Australian athletic authorities ban decided that no national Australian team will be sent to Hamilton for tin Empire Australian Games nex August. That is not tin attitude sportsmen expected, am it seems that the signifi cauco of the festival has noi been made dear enough. Do we wan a close union among the nations o the British Empire, and is tin “ United States of Britannia ” to la only a vision? The war showed tin Empire was truly one, with the ex ception of two small portions. Tin Hamilton festival is a great and vain able project, which is bound to hav« a beneficial effect on the welfare o the Empire, and all with a sense o’ pride and 'patriotism should support the games. Australia has four outstanding atb letes in Carlton, Golding, W. M. W’yate, and C. W. Hyde. Possibh two more cracks can be found to com plete the half-dozen, and a select team such as this could he sent 1a Canada without any groat drain or the financial resources of Australia This is particularly so. as Canada iim offered to contribute Cl ,000 towards the expense of an Australian national

team. It is to be hoped the sportsmen of Australia will realise what the Empire Gaines really mean, and promptly take steps to ensure that Hie Commonwealth will he represented and that some of the cracks will be on hand to help the Empire m the match against the United States, which will no doubt follow It is not just an athletic matter,' but a_ question of patriotism. Is Australia for the “ United States of Britannia ” or not? Failing an alteration m the views of the athletic authorities, it is up to the patriots in Australia to fake independent action. One of the most important crosscountry fixtures in England at the week-end was the Berks, Bucks, and Oxford championship at Beading, it served to show that E. S. Saunders has regained liis best form, the Wycombe athlete heating a large and representative held. He was a member of the British Olympic athletic team in 1928. and his latest form raises the hope that he will help Britain regain some lost prestige in the cross-country world. BOXING.

The poor showing of Baldoek against Blander came as a shock to most supporters of boxing in England, who really believed that the Roplar boxer was a world-beater. So be was once, but when a youth takes on about

200 contests before lie attains bis twenty-first birthday, is it to be wondered at that lie is used np, or “ burnt out ” as so well expressed in America, When Buldoek showed signs of stale ness and loss of fire some two years ago, the writer suggested in bis notes that lie should drop boxing for a year and spend the time in hard work m a lumber camp or on a farm in Canada or the United States. That would have regained him vitality and given him increased weight and stamina, ft may not bo too late, and Balclock would 'be wise to try tin’s method. In twelve months’ time he might he able to come hack and compete in a heavier division and show that lighting spirit which gained him ’such a big reputation earlier in his career. One thing about Baldoek which stands to his credit, is that ho is a real good “ plucked ’mi,” who, when really well, is not afraid to go in and ha\jc a light. The spirit alone is not enough, and lie must regain robust health and vitality, which will only come with increased weight, fur ho is too line drawn at present.

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SPORT IN BRITAIN, Lake Wakatip Mail, Issue 3940, 25 March 1930

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1,483

SPORT IN BRITAIN Lake Wakatip Mail, Issue 3940, 25 March 1930

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