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SPORT IN BRITAIN

LONDON, January 21 THE TURF.

Rules must be observed, nevertheless the average sportsman must have lelt regret that 1 ‘ the powers that be had to declare the Breezer was not entitled to second money lor the race associated with an incident unique in racing. Briefly, the circumstances were these; The Breezer, one of the contenders for a small hurdle race, fell near home and threw his jockey, who was too much shaken to remount. The daughter of the trainer happened to be near, and she promptly ran to the horse, mounted it, and rode past the post. Everyone admired her pluck and enterprise, and would have been pleased if a way could have been found to allow the Breezer’s second place to count. However, as she was not licensed as a jockey nor hud weighed out as the rider, it is difficult to see what other action the officials could take. Nevertheless, the incident is unique and deserves to be remembered among the remarkable things which have happened in connection with the turf.

A “ NATIONAL ” FAVOURITE. Owners and trainers interested in the Grand National are now concerned in giving their candidates serious training. Many followers of the steeplechase game regret that no steps have been taken to limit the size of the field, which would make for truer running and reduce the chances of cracks having thfeir prospects ruined through riderless horses and blunders of others. Reforms will come, however, and the sooner the better. . The victory of Easter Hero at Leicester this week has given wide satisfaction, and strengthened the belief of many good judges that Mi’ J. R. Whitney’s gelding will make a great bid for the famous steeplechase at Aintree at the end of March. Easter Hero is acclaimed the best ’chaser in training, and will probably be given 12st 71b to carry. It is a crushing burden to carry over the miles and big fences at Aintree, and there is much to be said in favour of the weights being from 10st 71b to 12st. This would be one practical way to restrict the field and confine it more to really class steeplechasers. To return to Easter Hero, Mr J. R. Anthony, his trainer, believes the chestnut has wintered well, and his Leicester performance is a pointer which sportsmen who like to take a chance by backing something at reasonable odds will act on. Gregalach, last year’s surprise winner, will soon be making his first appearance of the season. Of course he will have a very different impost next March, but even so any ’chaser which has successfully negotiated the course is worth supporting.

RUGBY FOOTBALL. The young men in the English Rugby team, which met Wales at Cardiff last Saturday, rather rubbed it in to the overage critic. It was widely suggested that England’s chance was very small, and that the heavy Welsh forwards would sweep the young and inexperienced players among the visiting side off their feet. Englishmen who play Rugger are not easily daunted, and it is probable that the adverse criticism served as a spur. That is how the English take these things, as many sporting happenings prove. Anyway, the game had only been in progress a few minutes when the critics awoke to the fact that the visiting team was well in the picture. It was J. 11. S. Reeve who seized an opening, and making a fine run he scored a try wide of the goal posts. The Welshmen were obviously surprised, and whilst Wales usually got the ball from the scrums the English defence was so good that every movement was smothered. Hardly had the second half opened when Reeve tricked the opposition (on receiving a pass from Sponge) and cut inside. His pace enabled him to get past his would-be tacklers, and he rounded off a great run by grounding the ball close to the posts. Black, the South African, who is at Oxford University, kicked successfully and put England 8 points up. The Welsh players now played up splendidly, and quickly met with success. a try coming their w r ay. Then commenced a series of hot attacks by Wales. The crowd had encroached over the touch-lines in places, and there was no room to throw in, so that scrums were almost compulsory. This favoured the Welshmen, who nearly always got the ball. Somehow the English forwards managed to bring out a supreme effort when it was most necessary. When a scrum was formed a few yards from the English line they usually managed to get the ball and relieve the situation. So the game went on, and as time drew nearer the Welsh attack faded out, and the English players again broke through and took play to the other end. The issue was settled when Black kicked a goal from a penalty, and so England gained a surprise win by 13 points to 3. A. L. Novis, brought in for D. R. Jacob, who was unable to play, and Sam Tucker, of Bristol, wired for late on the day of the match, played a big part in the win. Tucker had to fly to Cardiff and arrived just in time to play. The young blood in the English side should be tried again, and before long the combination will result in a really good team. The Australian Rugby League team finished a successful tour by defeating Wales at Wembley last Saturday by 26 points to 10. Many of the 25,000 spectators were watching the Rugby League game for the first time, and from what could be gathered it makes a strong appeal. The Australians were entertained to a luncheon in London this week by a party of Home sportsmen, and it was a nice finish to a very happy tour, ft appears to have proved a financial succcess, the profits being estimated at about £7,000. Strict stickers for amateurism are apt to frown down on Rugby League football, but it serves one very useful purpose. It attracts players who want to exploit their ability, and that makes for more genuine amateurism in Rugby Union circles by weeding this section out of the latter. This is surely better than posing as the real thing and evading the strict rules of amateurism.

ASSOCIATION

The Corinthians and had to meet three- times before the latter managed to beat the famous amateur team and so pass into the fourth round of the F.A. Cup competition. The Corinthians had the best of the play for more than half the game, but failed to last as well as their rivals.

This is just what might be expected as several of the amateurs are employed in work which leaves little time for real training. On the other hand the professional player can devote himself entirely to tips, which makes all the difference in a hard game. Most followers of football would have liked to see the Corinthians go farther, which would have helped amateur football. It is a case of “as you were,” in the first division of the league, Sheffield Wednesday, last season’s champions, still heading the table with a single point advantage over Manchester City, and for one fewer match. The Wednesday have a long way to go yet, but a goal record of 62 for and 29 against, speaks well for final success. BOXING. No boxer in recent times has done more than Kid Berg to uphold the fighting prestige of Britain. He has captured the United States fight “fans” by his aggressive methods, and high praise has been awarded him for the way he battered his way to victory againut Tony Cazoner at New Yorklast Saturday. Berg, born in the east end of London, will be home soon, and if he defeats Mushy Callahan, of America, in their match at the Albert Hall, be may be matched against Jack Hood for the welter-weight championship. It is thought that he is growing out of the light-weight class, and will be all the better for going up to the next division. Other prominent British boxers might well profit by the example of Berg, and make a hot attack their method, which is often the best form of defence. The Imperial Service team of amateur boxers touring in Norway did well when beating their rivals m a series of contests at Oslo, the visitors winning six of the ten bouts. This shows that there is nothing wrong with our amateurs. ATHLETICS. This is going to be a big year in amateur athletics, with the A.A.A. holding its jubilee championships, and the Empire Games at Hamilton. It is good news to hear that Eiic Licldle, the Olympic Games 400 metre* winner of 1924, will be home c.i leave from China, and probably making a bid for more championship honours. As he beat Dr O. Peltzer at 440 yds when the latter visited China recently, the Scot clearly retains his form. Another great runner in Golding, of Australia, may be here for the A.A.A. festival. 4s ‘he recently defeated Peltzer over the “quarter” in 48 3-10 sec, he is an outstanding crack. Mention of the Empire Games, it is hoped that every part of the Empire will be represented. Even should a Colony of Protectorate have no athlete capable of gaining a place, it will do untold good to see its standard bearer take part in the parade of the teams. Time is getting on and those concerned should act promptly and see to it that one on more athletes are sent to Hamilton next August.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/LWM19300318.2.3

Bibliographic details

SPORT IN BRITAIN, Lake Wakatip Mail, Issue 3939, 18 March 1930

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1,595

SPORT IN BRITAIN Lake Wakatip Mail, Issue 3939, 18 March 1930

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