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SIXTEEN LIVES SUPPOSED TO HAVE BEEN LOST IN THE SNOW.

A party arrived on the Dunstan on Monday evening, and presented himself to the Commissioner, stating that he had for some time been located in a gully between the Black Ball and Drunken Woman's Creek; he had with great difficulty succeeded in reaching the Dunstan. When he left the above gully on Thursday last, there were three women and several children, and some men—about 16 souls in all—snowed in and starving; and there was reason to believe had all perished. A relief party, headed by Mr. C. Rowley, was immediately despatched to their relief.

STICKING-UP NEAR THE HOGBURN.

On Monday, at about half-past 11 o'clock in the morning, Love's Accommodation-house was surrounded by four men, who, tying up the proprietor and nine diggers, took from them as follows :—Mr. Worden, £33; the landlord, £l4; J. S. M'Donald and J. P. Barber, £5 12s. 6d.; from the others they did not take anything. They each carried guns and revolvers, and they wore crape over their faces. They said they were waiting for two persons from the Hogburn, meaning the managers of the Banks of New Zealand and New South Wales, but who they fortunately missed.

Mr. Rhodes, the manager of Rowley's Express, started from here on the afternoon of Thursday last in quest of the boy who was employed riding the mail. The snow he reports, where the drift was heavy on the Nobby Ranges, was ten feet deep in many places; the path was entirely hid from sight. He had much difficulty in reaching Gardiner's Station, where he found the missing lad, who it appears left Tuapeka at the usual hour on Wednesday morning last; two days previous to that the snow had been almost continuously falling, but on that day it fell very heavily. He arrived at the Flagstaff Accomodation House about ten o'clock in the morning; the storm at that hour was raging furiously. Numbers of packers and travellers had given up all hopes of further pursuing their journey, deeming it unsafe to proceed ;

the mail boy had also given up the idea of going further. Mr. Gardiner, the pro- ! prietor of the run, and whose homestead is only nine miles distant, made I sure he could reach his dwelling safely, being so well acquainted with the country that he did not hesitate to start, which he did about noon, the mail boy keeping him company. They reached the Beaumont in safety, and after enormous exertion got up the " Devil's Back Bone;" but on the range the snow was so deep that not the slightest trace |of the road could be seen. The snow poles had been removed by some persons for firewood. They soon lost their way, and did not ] reach the station till next day. Their sufferings were extreme; Mr. Gardiner is, through its effects, seriously indisposed. The i boy also suffered severely, nearly losing the j use of his limbs. The people at the station ; behaved in the kindest manner possible; and i it was only through their exertions that the | poor lad recovered.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/LWM18630822.2.17

Bibliographic details

SIXTEEN LIVES SUPPOSED TO HAVE BEEN LOST IN THE SNOW., Lake Wakatip Mail, Volume I, Issue 33, 22 August 1863

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519

SIXTEEN LIVES SUPPOSED TO HAVE BEEN LOST IN THE SNOW. Lake Wakatip Mail, Volume I, Issue 33, 22 August 1863

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