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MONTHLY SUMMARY OF CURRENT EVENTS.

The past month has been not one whit behind its predecessor in excitement and commotion, and prone as the British subject is to public meetings, we should think that even the most rabid in this respect has had " enough and to spare" —the listeners, at all events; though perhaps that restless class, possessed by an eternal cacoethes loquendi, with which every small community abounds, and from which Queenstown is by no means free, may still long for additional opportunities to display their oratorical powers. There have been meetings on almost every conceivable subject, and no one can doubt the vigor with which they have been handled by our local statesmen, even if there may exist a lingering feeling of a quality besides that of vigor being necessary. The first of these meetings took place on Saturday evening, the 18th ultimo, called for the purpose of hearing the report of the delegates (sent to town, it may be remembered for the purpose of presenting to his Honor the Superintendent the petition of the inhabitants anent the removal of the Camp to Frankton), and also to take into consideration the advisability of establishing a Court of Mines. The second of these questions was left untouched; for the whole attention of the meeting was so taken up by three hours' stormy discussion on the first subject, that it was found too late to enter on the other, and the meeting was adjourned till the following Monday. Two subsequent meetings were called for the purpose of establishing a sort of Town Board, but on each of which the subject of the deputation was attempted to be brought on—on the first occasion unavailingly, but on the second with success, if a row of two hours' duration may be esteemed such. The Court of Mines was shelved sine die, considerations of party feeling overwhelming those of public benefit The origin of these contentions may be briefly stated, as partaking of the alleged monopoly of the funds collected by one of the delegates, and a statement which appeared in this journal respecting the reception of the deputation by the Superintendent. Anent the first, it transpired that two of the committee only— Messrs. Bracken and Powell —collected the funds on the day appointed for the departure of the deputation, concluding their labors but a few minutes before the steamer left Queenstown. There being no time for communication with the remainder of the committee, the money, amounting to £46, was handed over to Mr. Bradshaw, the other delegate—Mr. Gordon—having left for town some days previously by the Dunstan route. From the statement of several of the subscribers and gentlemen connected with the movement, it appears that Mr. Bradshaw declined to proceed to town Unless the sum of £4O should be placed at his disposal towards meeting his expenses; while Mr. Gordon stated that having business to transact in Dunedin, he would be satisfied with whatever sum the public or committee chose to award him. This, on the other hand, has been denied by Mr. Gordon, who claims half the amount of subscriptions. On this statement being made on the occasion of the first meeting, Mr. Bradshaw offered to immediately return the whole of the money to any person appointed by the meeting, at the same time holding to his previous statement —that he stipulated for £4O. What followed can only be attributed to personal spite or petty malice on the part of two or present, for a tirade of abuse was kept up for two hours, the drift of which seemed to to inflict a stain on the character of Mr. Bradshaw, by making it appear that he was forced to return the money by outward pressure, not of his own free will and sense of honor. Mr. Bradshaw, it has since transpired, was subsequently waited on by several of the subscribers, and informed that if he returned the money he would be held responsible. That gentleman, therefore, continues to hold the money, and we understand that a summons has been taken out to compel him to return it. It will thus be seen that the whole affair turns upon the question whether or not Mr. Bradshaw stipulated for the sum of £4O; and judging from the evidence of many of his fellow townsmen, it appears that he did do so, and the handing over of the money to him he took for a tacit acquiescence in the arrangement. With regard to the second cause of the discord —the statement made by us of the manner in which the deputation was received —our remarks will be few, as we have no desire to emulate the example set by the

gentlemen in question, and make the eternal ego the sum and substance of everything praiseworthy. It is a peculiarity of the administration of John Hyde Harris, Esq., that he abhors the presence of the public, as represented by the press, and has an unmitigated " down ' upon everything savoring of the office of a reporter. Acting on this feeling, therefore, he excluded the press from the audience chamber,thus driving the public to seek for information from an irregular source, and one far more liable to error and misrepresentation than the agent of a newspaper could be. The effects of this piece of Old Identity wisdom is shown in the fact that out of the three papers that contained an account of the reception of the delegates, no two agreed; and for the same reason no one can reasonably claim the advantage of correctness over the other; while, to mend the matter, the three delegates (including the one from the Shotover) give three separate and discordant accounts of their reception. We have been blamed for misrepresenting facts—what guarantee have we that our contemporaries are correct, since they drew their, information from the same irregular source as ourselves ? If those in office will persist in a course so opposed to the principles of the age in which we live, they have only themselves to blame; and if misrepresented, they have no claim to consideration or sympathy from the public they endeavor to blind. But putting ourselves altogether aside, the question may be looked upon from quite another point of view—that is to say, we can plead justification. The objectionable part of the petition, as far as can be ascertained, lies in the term "unparalleled ignorance," as applied to the Government, and on this subject we agree with the remarks made by one of the delegates in a letter published ih our issue of the 22nd ult. The writer says:— " I believe the words V unparalleled ignorance" stuck in his Honor's throat, —but what other terms could better express the fact, particularly after Mr Pyke's declaration, that the Government were 4 entirely ignorant' of the removal of the Camp, &c., and that Mr. Wood was alone to blame. I leave those who have backed out of the memorial to impale themselves on either horn of this dilemma. The statement was true, or else they were wrong in making it; the statement was true, or Mr. Pyke was wrong in making it. And it follows as a logical deduction that, if the statement was true, the Superintendent was uncourteous in refusing the memorial." The presence of Mr. Pyke in Queenstown ' produced a series of wonderful changes in the i minds of men who a few days before were the ■ chief promoters of the deputation movement i —a change accountable for only by a reason which would be more creditable to the ingenuity and knowledge of human nature i possessed by Mr. Pyke, than to the sense of, honor of the gentlemen who have thus re-! versed their outer habiliment. One gentleman notoriously active and strenuous in the prosecution of the affair, has suddenly become painfully conscious of his own moral abasement, and has called upon his fellow townsmen to humble themselves before the golden (or goldfields) calf set up for their worship, j Whether the Queenstown public will imitate I this example, and swallow their words, expressing as it does the moral conviction of every inhabitant of the goldfields, remains to be seen, as also whether the gentleman in question will rise in either private or official estimation through this act of humiliation and renegadeism. Another provocative of public meetings has been the proposed establishment of a Town Board, or Improvement Committee, for Queenstown. The revenue of this body, the improvements contemplated, and the source whence it derives its power, are at present in nubibus; and we cannot help regasding the attempted establishment of this body as one of the most complete popular fallacies as ever engaged the attention of the late Dr. Lardner. It is impossible that municipal institutions can be bestowed on an unsold township; and as for an Improvment Committee, were improvements of any consequence necessary, it might be of advantage; though still the residents of the district might have some natural disinclination to trust their funds with an irregularly constituted and irresponsible body, who might ▼ote themselves a supper of congratulation on their election, or bestow a contract on one of themselves. We would not for a moment wish it to be supposed that we believe any of the gentlemen elected would do this; but the fact of the irresponsible nature of this body would be sufficient to deter numbers from subscribing. The past month has been fraught with serious calamity on the Shotover and Arrow goldfields, and in too many cases human life has been sacrificed, from a series of floods and landslips that have taken place since our last summary. The flood which hap-

pened on the week ending July 11th, for it was of two or three days' duration, had scarcely abated, and enabled the miners to take stock of the damage done, than the news of a landslip on the Shotover, involving the loss of six men, reached town. Several slight slips had previously occurred, but without doing any serious damage either to life or property. The floods, however, had so loosened the ground in many parts of the river, as to give rise to serious apprehensions,' which have been unfortunately realised. The first accident happened about four miles above Moke Cieek, on Sunday evening, the 12th ult. It appears that the continued rising of the river, owing to the heavy rains, had somewhat alarmed a party of miners living in the above locality, and they determined to watch all night, in case of any accident. Between 10 and 11, one of the men, named John Bell, resolved to cross a creek dividing their hut from three others on the other side, for the purpose of borrowing a watch. This creek—though usually containing but one sluicehead of water, was now rushing down with fearful rapidity, and nearly three feet deep—he safely crossed, and arrived at the hut, which was the lowest of the three. Whilst there, a terrific roar echoed over the mountains, and an avalanche of stones, earth, and water came crashing down the inoHne, passing within three feet of the door of the hut. The site of the hut which Bell had just quitted, and most of the ground about, was stripped to the bed rock; and of the hut itself not a trace was to be found, while 4he two above were levelled, and partly carried away. Exposed to the driving storm, the survivors remained on the hill till morning dawned, when they were able to discover the cause of j this terrible accident. The creek before- | mentioned had not been sufficient to carry off! the water, which, being dammed back behind a bank, had gradually accumulated, till, the bank itself being undermined and partially washed away, the superincumbent pressure drove the mass bodily before it in a slanting direction, levelling the first two huts, just missing the third by two or three feet, and carrying that on the opposite side of the creek away with the unfortunates within it. Three of the bodies have since been rescued, and a coroner's jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence. Scarcely had the gloom that clouded the minds of the miners in consequence of the accident, been dissipated, and they had just began again to repair their losses, than a still heavier flood happened, totally eclipsing those of previous occurrence. Still heavier poured down the deluge of rain, while the warmth of the weather brought down the snow, till then wrapping with a robe of dazzling white the summits of the frowning mountains which environ the Lake. The rain commenced on Friday evening, the 24th ult., and lasted till Sunday, at noon, when it ceased. The rushing of the descending waters, mingled with the rumbling roar of the enormous landslips, rolled like thunder through the air, spreading consternation among all within hearing of their hideous clamor. The Kawarau became soon choked with the tremendous rush of water poured into it from the Lake, the Shotover, and the Arrow, which immediately began to rise, and repeat their former devastation. The Lake itself began to rise in a most alarming manner, threatening destruction to, a considerable part of the township. At one time the waters rose ten inches in twenty minutes, and the whole of the jetties were soon on a level with the surface of the Lake, while the rear of the houses in Rees and Beach streets were considerably beneath it, despite sundry dams constructed to defend them from the encroaching waters. Thousands of feet of timber were floating about the bay, and large quantities of firewood piled up on the beach by too confiding residents, added to the grand total of debris. The quantity of water which poured down to swell the huge volume of water that constitutes the Lake, to its maximum increase of 6 feet, may be judged from the fact that it is 70 miles in length by an average of about three. On the Shotover the damage done to property and life was deplorable. The water rose to a height hitherto quite unparalleled, and, as a consequence, every dam and race was levelled, while pumps, sluice-boxes, cradles, and almost every description of mining tools, were carried away; and stores and tents were either submerged or smashed to pieces. The most distressing feature of all this, however, is the loss of life, which has been terrible, chiefly through landslips, comparatively few being drowned. At the Arrow, the river again burst its bounds, submerged the whole of the Flat, and drove the inhabitants of the Lower Township to seek refuge on higher ground. The Shamrock Hotel and the stores adjacent were undermined and flooded, and became total wrecks. The Bush Creek suddenly rose to an alarming height; miners and others encamped sixteen

feet or more above the stream had to run for their lives, and three unfortunate men engaged as sawyers were killed by a landslip. I The chief cause of the numerous landslips seems to have been the natural damming up of water on the high ground, when the dams j suddenly burst, carrying away everything in i their path. It is to this that most of the accidents —a long and gloomy list —that have j happened may be referred. At the head of ' the Lake, and the rushes on the route, the same tale of devastation is reported, though ' in a less degree; and, fortunately, without | any loss of life being recorded. All the lowi lying ground at the head of the Lake was . under water, and the Dart and Rees rivers were amalgamated towards their mouths. The following is a list of the men who have lost their lives in the Wakatip district inconsequence of the floods and slips of the past month:— Patrick Gleeson, drowned while attempting to cross the Shotover during the flood 011 the Bth July. About four miles above Moke Creek, Shotover, on the 12th July : William Buchan. Alexander M'lntosh, aged 36, native of Scotland Michael Townsend, aged 27, native of Callen, County Kilkenny. Richard Aylward, aged 36, near Galstown, County Kilkenny. Michael Cudohy, aged 24, Callen, County Kilkenny. John M'Donald. Skipper's Gully, Shotover, 12th July:— Timothy Sheehan (or " Yankee" Sheehan), native of Ardcannaught, Kilgarrylander, Castlemaine, County Kerry, Ireland. Eugene M'Mahon, native of Manor, Tralee, County Kerry, Ireland. Near Moke Creek, above Arthur's Point, Shotover, on the 26th July:— John Lynch, Clonrush, Galway, Ireland. Michael Lynch, do., do. Thomas Noonan, do., do. Michael Egan, do., do. James Kelly, County Down, Ireland. Patrick Murnin, do., do. Patrick Travers, do., do. John M'Whinney, do., do. Robert Weir, do., do. Wm. M'Allen, County Antrim, Ireland. Charles Wilkinson, do., do. At the Sandhills, Shotover, on the 26th July John Fraser, Stirlingshire, Scotland. William Wilson, Scotland. Wilson, do. William Cummins, County Clare, Ireland. George Jack. James Allen. Joseph Mortimer. John Hornbuckle. Samuel Gretton. Peter Hunter. David Angus. Another man, name unknown. Injured.—Andrew Gray, Andrew Guthrie, David Drew, Edward Hylo. At the Arrow, on the 9th July:— William Burke. John Brous. John Brown. Fred ; and another, name unknown. At Moonlight River, on tiie 31st July : Kenneth Cameron. Notwithstanding the terrible reverses that the miners have thus sustained, their confidence in their claims remains unimpaired; and they express their opinion that were the river at its summer level, at which time.it is less subject to floods, they would be enabled to turn the river and work its bed. The richness of this modern Pactolus is something marvellous, and were it not a matter of notoriety, the public mignt well be excused for disbelieving the stories of its enormous wealth. Previous to the floods, Campbell and party washed out over twelve pounds' weight; Strachan and party about five or six pounds; and Sullivan and party took out sufficient to have yielded over 30 lbs. weight, but a third of which was carried away by the rising of the river. Out of Campbell's claim, which is only 47 feet frontage, there has been 106 lbs. weight of gold taken out, and not one-fourth of it worked yet. Previous to Campbell purchasing it, which he and a party of five others did lor i'6so from the Maori party, the original holders took out over 50 lbs. weight of gold. Another party of six obtained 800 oz. out of 20 feet of the river; it will be years before the bed of the river is exhausted, " as every flood seems to bring down fresh deposits." Two quartz reefs, which it is estimated will yield from 10 to 13 ozs. to the ton, have been discovered near Stony Creek, and a beautiful specimen, weighing 4 ozs. 9 dwts., studded with gold in every part, was shown to us on Thursday evening. We understand that 20 claims were taken up on one day on the line of one reef. Two rushes have also taken place during the past week—one between Wilson's Beach and Maori Point, and one between Maori Point and Packer's Point.

The river has hitherto engrossed the attention of the miners, but since the flood they have sought for other places where their earnings, if not so large, would be more reliable ; and the Warden, to enable them to do this, has granted protection to their claims for one month. The presence of gold is everywhere apparent throughout the whole district, and from a little gully lying between Queenstown and Frankton, a fine specimen of rough heavy gold was shown to us a week or two back. I It is in contemplation by several gentlemen of the district to form a company for the purpose of working the Shotover gorge—a locality which has for some time been an object of considerable attraction to the miners j —under the Mining Lease Regulations now in operation. These regulations bear the impress of the same master mind that conceived and carried out the rules concerning river and beach claims on such tidal rivers as the Shotover and Molyneux, and which have been productive of such an amount of jealousy and contention to the miners, and uneasiness and trouble to the Wardens. The, result of this Act, if carried out, will be to throw the auriferous lands into the hands of speculators, banded together for the mere purpose of forming a bubble company, from which they can drive a handsome profit. There are hundreds of men on the Shotover who have invested capital to a large amount, and given labor, which represents capital, and to grant a lease at the present juncture would be equivalent to robbing the digger. So long as the workers on the river can work payable claims on the beaches, ko, they will not think of working in the Gorge; but suppose that the beaches are worked out, is it not disgraceful that, under this new Act bubble companies can bold all the lands in the Gorge and prevent the digger from even prospecting ? The establishment of a Court of Mines is a question which has been debated with considerable interest among the miners during the past month, though in Queenstown it has been put aside to make room for discussions of a livelier nature, though of more questionable utility. There can be no doubt of the necessity for a court of appeal, for the power of the wardens is absolute and unlimited as their duties are ill defined and vague. At present the decision of the Warden is final, for the expense of attending and supporting an appeal to the Supreme Court at Dunedin, is so heavy, combined with the loss of time, that it effectually closes this only court of appeal in Otago to all comparatively wealthy digger. Courts of Mines, which would act as a salutary check upon the wardens, should undoubtedly be established, and from the importance of this district one should be held periodically at Queenstown, the judge of which should also sit in criminal cases. Having no criminal court neajrer than Dunedin holds forth a positive premium for crime, as owing to the small expenses allowed for going to Dunedin, persons are most reluctant to prosecute in cases beyond the jurisdiction of the Resident Magistrate's Court. Such a state of things call for immediate action on the part of the Government, and it is to be hoped our newly elected goldfields' members will direct their attention to this important subject. The Head of the Lake has not abated in public interest, and the eyes of many of the residents ofQueenstown, as well as the miners, are eagerly directed thitherwards as the great scene of operation in the spring. The humidity of the season has in the meantime to a great extent crippled the workings, yet still a large number of men remain, and we have heard of several heavy parcels of gold that have reached town from that locality. Gold is found literally everywhere, though till the advent of dryer weather, the heaviest deposits lie beyond the reach of the miners. Both the quality and quantity of the precious metal improves as it trends westward, and there really seems to be no reasonable doubt that a goldfield of permanence and value will shortly be traced to the very sea-coast. Another vessel—the cutter Aquila—has returned from a visit to the West Coast, having been chartered by a party of prospectors in the month of March last. They tell the same tale of hardships, but this was chiefly owing to a breach of faith on the part of the captain of the Aquila, who agreed to take a five months' supply of provisions, whereas he had on board sufficient for barely two. The prospectors ascended a river named by them the Wakatip, and which, at a distance of several miles from the coast, widened into a lake of very considerable dimensions, leading from which was another river, and above that a second lake. Neither of the lakes are laid down in the maps. From the head of the second lake the prospectors proceeded about five miles further inland, but were reluctantly compelled to retrace their steps, in consequence of their provisions running short.

Although no gold was discovered by the prospectors on this river, still the general appearance of the country, and the great quantity of washed gravel, quartz, &c., —the indications of gold to the practical miner—led them to suppose that the ground they were traversing was auriferous; and had it not been that hunger compelled them to retreat before the place was fairly tested, it was the general opinion of the party that a discovery of importance would have been made. There is an air of probability given to this supposition when we take into consideration the fact that there could have been only a distance of a few miles between the head of the second lake visited and the west coast of Lake Wakatip. But a short time will probably elapse before other parties will visit the 6ame locality, and if nothing else is effected, the question as to there being a practicable track from the Lake to the West Coast will be set at rest. Ihe news of two new rushes have reached town during the past month—one to the right-hand branch of Skippers, and one to Swanston's station, about six miles from the rush at Switzer's. With respect to the first, we may mention that a large number of men are employed, and they all speak well of the place and cheerfully of their prospects; but of the second we cannot give so good an account —the mere name of Switzer's being almost sufficient to prevent a rush. But few are on the groimd, and we have not heard of any news from that quarter worth repeating. Queenstown is steadily progressing, and bids fair shortly to become the principal town ! on the Otago goldfields; and now that the ridiculous hobby of the Government in relation to Frankton has been ridden down, several permanent and expensive buildings of iron, wood, and stone arc being erected by the storekeepers and residents, whose confidence in the district is only equalled by that of the miners. The Camp buildings, comprising a commodious court-house, with police barracks, and quarters for the different officers, are being rapidly proceeded with; and when completed will be no less an ornament to the township than a convenience to all concerned. The Bank of New Zealand, too, is about to emulate the example of the other banks in this township, and erect a building not quite so provocative of catarrh and rheumatism as the present, and which, when complete, may vie with that of any other branch bank on the goldfields. Several storekeepers and private residents are building, and we may shortly look upon dwellings of canvass as things of the past. After a wrangle of three months duration, the Government have graciously consented to the formation of tracks between Queenstown and the surrounding township and gold-work-ings. A track is to be cut from this township to Frankton, and that now existing between the latter place and the Arrow is to be | improved and repaired. One from Arthur's ; Point to Skipper's is in course of formation, and another from Queenstown to Arthur's i Point will be commenced immediately. We ! may therefore hope for comparatively easy means of communication with the various diggings of the district. In addition to this unexpected stroke of good fortune we may remark that a post-office is to be established at Maori Point, with a bi-weekly mail, via Arthur's Point. In consequence of the frequent delays that have taken place in the conveyance of the mails between Dunedin and the Lake, owing to the swollen state of the rivers—the public of this district greet with intense satisfaction the establishment of an additional bi-weekly mail, via the Dunstan, and which will place that important goldfield within easy access of us, besides being of immense advantage as a means of communicating more directly with Dunedin, the Dunstan route being comparatively frea from those natural disadvantages so numerous on the other road. Another specimen of the peculiar manner by which posts of honor and emolument are obtained under the present regime, has lately been exhibited in the appointment of a Warden for the Arrow district, in which is shown, i as in almost everything else, the all-powerful hand of the chief of police. We are beginning to get used to being ridden over roughshod by the police myrmidons, but this piece of jobbery is so glaring as to call for universal condemnation —not against the newly-ap-pointed Warden himself, but against his patron, who, from forming a road to making a puppet Superintendent, is constantly meddling with what does not concern him or his department. • As in Victoria, under Mr. O'Shauassy, nothing was esteemed worthy of consideration unless possessing the flavor of Hibernia, combined with Catholicity—so in Otago the door of advaijcement is closed to all but policemen; and why the secretary of the Chief Commissioner should be appointed over the heads of those gentlemen in the same branch of the public service who have fulfilled their positions with credit to themselves ane

profit to the country, we leave those better acquainted with the Chief Commissioner than we are, or wish to be, to decide. The smallness of the quantity of gold by Escort from Queenstown, on Thursday last, 960 ozs., does not arise from the actual falling off of the precious metal in the district, nor from the late severe floods, but, in consequence of a circular letter addressed to the Bank Managers of this place, from the Government Gold Receiver, intimating that no gold shall in future be transmitted by the Government Escort without the contents of the bags shall have been previously examined by the Government Gold Receiver. The Managers, therefore, have rightly refused to submit their gold to the captious gaze of any Government official without a corresponding advantage being given in the way of a receipt of responsibility of gold having actually been sent. This the Receiver, it appears, has not the power to do, and, therefore, the bulk of the gold that would have been sent by Thursday's Escort, is now in the hands of Bank Managers here, pending instructions from the Managers from head-quarters as to whether they are to submit to a Government examination. We understand the Manager of the Bank of New Zealand has forwarded his gold —the Government Gold Receiver having most courteously examined it in the New Zealand institution prior to its being lodged in the Government Treasury. • The new Hospital in this district is now fast approaching completion, and is a large and commodious building, containing two large wards, each fifty feet long, well lighted and ventilated, apartments for the doctor and matron, and all the necessary outhouses for carrying out the general detail in a systematic and efficient manner. The hospital is at Frankton, and the site selected is certainly well adapted for the building, as being picturesque, airy, and capable of being thoroughly drained —a desideratum in buildings where sanatory measures are so necessary. Its position is also very central, being within easy travelling distance of any of our principal mines. Meetings have been convened on all the principal goldfields by Richmond Beetham, Esq., R. M., who was duly elected President of the Institution at the first meeting, and has since shown commendabltN?eal in carrying out the duties he undertook. The meetings at the Arrow, Frankton, Shotover, and Queenstown, have been signally successful in a pecuniary sense, each showing a praiseworthy rivalry in doing his best to outstrip his neighour in this good cause. Although only a week since the first meeting, upwards of £4OO have been already subscribed, and this with the Government subsidy forms a very large item to commence upon, and speaks volumes for the zeal of its inhabitants and prosperity of the district generally. The Church of England at Queenstown is now opened, and divine service takes place every Sunday morning and evening, Mr. Rees officiating as lay reader on these occasions. It is built of wood, and when completed in its internal fittings, will be commodious and comfortable. The Church is managed by a Committee of gentlemen, whose names 'are a guarantee for efficiency in carrying out the affairs of the same, and who are now endeavoring to liquidate the balance of account due for building material, and which, by the assistance of our townspeople they will shortly accomplish. On Wednesday, the 22nd of July, the Foun-dation-stone of the Masonic Hall at Queenstown was laid with an amount of eclat seldom attendant on public ceremonies, so distant from the metropolis. The building is of stone, twenty feet wide by forty in length, and faces the Lake, where its proportions and solidity renders it an object of interest to strangers, and no doubt when completed will be au ornament to Queenstown. This is the first Masonic Hall of stone erected in the Province, and is called the u Lake of Ophir." The most interesting part of the procession was that in which the members of the Brotherhood carried the different insignia of their craft, which were as following:— Visiting Brethren—Members of Lodge according to rank, juniors first. Steward (Bro. Wood) bearing vrine in silver goblet. Steward Bro. Christenson, bearing oil in crystal flagon. Steward Bro. Weaver, bearing sheaf of corn. Secretary Bro. Bruce, bearing Book of Constitution. Treasurer Bro. Brown, bearing urn containing coins. Junior Warden Bletcher, bearing level. Senior Warden Morton, bearing square. Chaplain Bro. Broad, bearing Holy Scriptures on crimson cushion. Steward Bro. Harvey. Bro. Tyree, P.M., bearing mallet. Bro. Reuben Harris, P.M., attended by his Steward, Bro. Crofts. Bro. Mollison, sword-bearer. Mounted Troopers. Foot Police. The procession was accompanied to the site of their labors by about 400 persons anxious to view the inurning of the coins and other minutia connected with the ceremony.

At the Arrow, the great question of the month has been the drainage of the Flat, which, though known to be auriferous in tho highest degree, remains almost unworked, owing to the large quantity of water met with in sinking. A committee was appointed at a large and unanimous meeting held at the Arrow on the evening of the 18th ult., by the style and title of the Drainage Committee, to consider the best means to effect - the desired object. The Government Mining Surveyor recommended that the drainage be effected by means of a large overshot wheel, worked by the water of the Bush Creek, conducted by flumes, but this scheme did not not meet with very great favor, as the expense would be enormous. The Drainage Committee convened a meeting on the 28th ult., and informed the public that a system of drainage by means of overshot.wheels had been decided upon, but that they had not yet correctly ascertained from which creek it would be best to conduct the water required; that the great expense of a tail race had induced the committee to consider whether it would not be practicable to raise the water to the surface and run it off into the river; that sub-committees were employed investigating the necessary details, both with regard to construction and expense j that the committee had sent in a memorial to the Superintendent, asking for a subsidy, —the amount guaranteed in the township, £560, having justified them in so doing. Mr. Beetham had taken charge of the memorial, and had in every way most cordially seconded the objects of the committee. It is to be hoped that the strenuous efforts now being made to conquer this solitary but formidable obstable to the success of the miners and the prosperity of the township, will be soon removed, and that this known wealthy and important field may take its proper stand among the first of the gold producing districts of Otago.

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MONTHLY SUMMARY OF CURRENT EVENTS., Lake Wakatip Mail, Volume I, Issue 29, 8 August 1863

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MONTHLY SUMMARY OF CURRENT EVENTS. Lake Wakatip Mail, Volume I, Issue 29, 8 August 1863

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