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TOWN & COUNTRY.

Acknowledgment.— The Hospital housesteward begs to acknowledge with thanks the receipt of £4 from the members of the Christchurch Debating Society, being a donation to the Hospital Library Fund.

Kaiapoi Presbyterian Church. —An entertainment and tea meeting in connection with the Sunday school, was held in this church cn Saturday, when there was a largo attendance. The Bev W. M'Gregor presided, and a very en joyable evening was snent.

* Academy ov Music.—Despite the wretched weather last night, the Gem Variety Company drew a moderately large audience, whom they succeeded in keeping in excellent humour Dy a new programme, concluding with the laughable ballet d'action, “ La Statue Blanche.” {Che same programme is announced for this evening. The Unemployed.—The. Committee of the unemployed are about to make a final appeal to the public for aid, in order to defray the necessary expenses consequent on their recent movements, and have appointed Messrs Bradshaw, Harris, and Mathe ws as canvassers. Through relieving distress, the Committee find themselves in pecuniary difficulties, and they therefore hope that their appeal will be responded to. Imphovxns the Roadways.—The quantise* of shingle which have been or are to be placed on the city roadways during the present year are as follows :--St Asaph street, 380 cubic yardsj Tuam street, 600yds 5 Lichfield street, 820yds j Elmore street, 410yds 5 Peterborough street, 840yds; Salisbury street, 260yds; Madras street, 480yds; Manchester street, 270yds ; South belt, 580yds ; North belt (one side), 2400yds; total, 7040yds. An additional quantity, 3000yds, is being used for general repairs.

1.0.0. F., M.U.—The half-yearly meeting of the Leithfield Oddfellows’ Ledge was held on Wednesday evening. There war a fair attendance of members, including the D.P.GKM. Bro. A. Simpson. The election of officers was held, resulting as follows: —N.G., Bro. B. Smyth ; Y.G., Bro. A. M'Lean; Bro. R. H. Rhodes was unanimously reelected Secretary. The D.P.G.M. stated to the Lodge the action, being taken by the district officers.with regard to registration of the district and lodges; and the Lodge then dosed.

Ministebs’ Association.—The monthly meeting was held on Monday last at the usual’ time and place; present —Revs J. B. Richardson (chairman), A. Reid, W. Bau nber, 0. Dallaston, 0. Eraser; J. White, A. Peters, J. Orewes, and J. Clover. As was previously resolved immediately after the confirmation of the minutes, the Rev. J. Orewes read his paper ' on “ Life and Death.” The paper evinced a considerable amount of earnest and patient thought and study, and provoked a somewhat lengthy discussion, in which diverging opinions were, expressed; and - which was interesting and profitable throughout. After the discussion the eleotion of officers was proceeded with, the following appointments being resolved upon:—President, Rev A. Reid; Secretary, Rev. J. Clover. The Benediction was pronounced by the Rev A. Reid, and the meeting terminated. ;

A.O.F. —The quarterly summoned meeting of Court 2309 was hold last ; evening, at the Foresters’ Hall, Oxford. terrace. There was a very large attendance. During the evening P.D.0.8. Crooks, Secretary of the Widows and Orphans’ Fund, spoke at length on the benefit of joining the fund; and called the members’ attention to the annual performance in aid of same on July 29; The election of officers for the ensuing; term resulted as fob lows:—Chief Ranger, Joseph Swindell; SubChief Ranger, T. Cooper; Senior Beadle, A, Anderson; Junior Beadle, H. J. Woodard; Senior Woodward, J. Mummery; Junior Woodward, G. Baron; Permanent Secretary, W. Buckley; Assistant Secretary, F. 0. Phipps; Minute Secretary, T. V. Whitmore; Surgeons, Drs Dedmer and Campbell ; Trustee, D. Pino; District Delegates,; J. 8. Williams andE. Watts; Management Committee—Buckley, Samuels, Whitmore, Hubbard, and J. J. Newman. The receipts of the evening amounted to £l9O 4s 7d. |

OHBIBTOH.TJECH BeHBVOLBHS ASSOCIATION,—The weekly meeting of the Committee of the above Association was held at the Dep6t, the old Post Office, yesterday afternoon, His Worship the Mayor in the chair. Mr Ollivier brought before the Committee the report of the last -meeting, furnished by Mr Poster to the Lyttelton Times, and complained that he there asserted that he held the position of Honorary Secretary, and not caretaker. He considered'the office should bo clearly defined, and that Mr Poster should confine himself to the duties of caretaker. Mr Poster said£that he adhered td his statement to the effect that ho was Honorary Sioretary, and declining to act in any other capacity, left the room. The Committee, after consideration, accepted Mr Poster's resignation. It was decided to appoint someone to take temporary charge oftheDepOD, and to select a new caretaker at next mooting. The Mayor reported that the balance in the Bank to the credit of the Association amounted to £lO5 18s lOd. The caretaker’s report stated that 200 sacks had been purchased for the use of the Association, and that liberal donations of clothing, blankets, groceries, &0., had been received. The Committee then proceeded to consider various applications for aid referred from the Sub-Committee, and relief in various ‘ways was granted. It was resolved-—" That the thanks of the Committee he accorded to Mrslnnesfor her kindness in attending for the distribution of food and clothing, and that this Committee request her to continue her valuable services.’’ - Accounts amounting to £42 5s 2d were passed’ for payment, add the meeting adjourned,

Kaiapoi Bmidbnx Magistrate's Court, —There was ho fitting of this Court yestcrday, as Mr Whitofoom hod to Sit ia Christohuroh.

Teamway to Arlington.-- The Tramway Company proposes to alter the route of its lino to Addington, bj avoiding Cashel, Montreal, and Tuatn streets, and running instead along Oxford terrace. Tho City Council has referred the application to the Works Committee to bo reported upon. Juryman Fined.™ One of the petty jury, named William Colton, did not appear yesterday at the Supremo Court when his name was called. Bis Honor directed him to bo fined dOi unless cause was shown. A member of tho Lyttelton Fire Brigade pleaded the law in favour of bis exemption, and was duly exempted. !

1.0.G.T. Liberator Lodob No. I.—The usual weekly meeting of the above took place at the Temperance Hall, Gloucester street west, on Thursday, July 1. Tho business of the evening having been gone through, three new members were initiated. It was proposed to hold an'opon meeting, due notice of which will be given. The Lodge was closed in due form by Bro Armstrong, W.0.T., at 9.30, ending a pleasant evening.

Beadshaw’s Guide.— We have received from Mr Noil Black, tho Christchurch agent, a copy of the July issue of Bradshaw's Guide to New Zealand. On previous occasions, mention has been made, in terms of commendation, of the neat and methodical arrangement of the book, and of the completeness of its information. The present issue folly sustains the prestige of the Guide, and the accompanying maps, very clear in their details, cannot fail to be of value.

Acknowledgment of Merit.— The City Council, at its meeting last evening, resolved to expend the sum of £3O for procuring silver medals, to be given to members of the Fire Brigade in recognition of continued service. These medals are to take the place of a small and insignificant looking badge which has hitherto been issued. For two years’service the usual certificate is to be given; for five years’ service, a silver medal; and for every additional two years’ service, a silver bar is to be added to the medal. The design is neat and effective, the prominent feature being the figure of a fireman in relief, in the act of directing a stream from one of the branches.

Supreme Court. —The criminal sessions of the Supreme Court were opened yesterday, and during the day nine cases were disposed of with the following results: —Bobert Henry Bogers, for forgery, was sentenced to four years’ penal servitude; Edgar Ballinger, for embezzlement, was sentenced to 12 months’ imprisonment with hard labour; William Maddams, for burglary, was sentenced to penal servitude for three years j Biobard Wood, for stealing from a shop, was sentenced to two years’ imprisonment with hard labour; Mathew Longden, for larceny from the person, was sentenced to four years’ penal servitude; John Felz Bandy, for a similar offence, was sentenced to six months’ imprisonment with hard labour; Henry Hayes, for forgery, was sentenced to 18 months’ imprisonment with hard labour; and Michael Higgins, for larceny, was sentenced to a like term of imprisonment. Henry White, on a charge of larceny from the person, was acquitted. There still remain ten charges to be disposed of.

Bakgioba Peesbytebiak Ohuboh.—On Sunday evening the Rev D. Bruise, of Auckland, Secretary of the Presbyterian Church Extension Committee, conducted the service at the above church. As it had been announced previously that Mr Bruce would meet the congregation after the service to consider the removal of the Rev P. R. Monro, there was a good attendance, despite the very inclement state of the weather. At the conclusion of the sermon the reverend gentleman said that he was unable to state definitely how the Committee would act in the matter of the removal 5 but having had the opportunity of seeing for himself the requirements of the district, he would be able to make recommendations to the Committee when they met, and matters would remain in abeyance at any rate for two months or so, till the Committee had fully considered the question. Other arrangements had been made whion would, under the circumstances, remain in abeyance. He proceeded to show the reasons for the frequent removal of theological students at short intervals. After the service Mr Bruce met the Committee of the church, and held a further conversation with them on the matter at issue.

Resident Maqisteatb’s Const. The Resident Magistrate’s Court was held yesterday morning for the first time in the new buildings, before Mr 0. Whitefoord and a full Bench. Mr Perceval congratulated the Bench upon the change from the old premises to their new building. Mr Whitefoord replied that the change would, no doubt, prove equally beneficial and gratifying to the members of the Bar, and especially so to the gentlemen of the Press, who had hitherto had to perform their duties under circumstances of great ' difficulty. The feelings of thankfulness which had been given expression to, were speedily modified. Without doubt, the new building is palatial as compared with the old den, but the acoustic properties of the new Court are absolutely dreadful. The listener experiences a sensation as though he sat in an immense drum, the tympani of which were being incessantly vibrated. Magistrates, lawyers—everybody concerned, speedily expressed intense dissatisfaction. The witness box was shifted by way of experiment, and the change possibly effected an improvement so far as the magistrates were concerned ; but the reporters did not afterwards hear a single complete sentence of evidence. Not a day should-be lost in endeavouring to palliate this most serious evil as far as possible, by laying down matting on the floors of the Court, the gallery and the adjacent passages. This plan, and strictness on the part of the golice in keeping the utmost order, may peraps render the place endurable. Otherwise, the new Court will be universally regarded as far more unpleasant than the old one.

The Wbathbe. —Owing to delays through land slips south of Oamaru, the express from Dunedin did not reach Christchurch till 11.30 last night. No serious damage is as yet reported, owing to the heavy rams of Saturday and Sunday. Port of the Byreton railway line was rendered unfit for traffic yesterday morning. The portion injured is about a mile on the Oxford side of the Oarleton station. Repairs were soon effected, and traffic was resumed last night.—The north branch of the Waimakariri was slightly in flood yesterday, owing to the Oust, the Byre, and the Rangiora mam drain being all more or less in a state of heavy fresh.—The flood in the Waipara yesterday grevented both the mail contractors, getting through: the river. Mr Holder carried the mail hags across the railway bridge, and took them thenoe on saddle to Waikari, whare he expected to meet his coach coming from the North. Apropos of the Cheviot contractor, he had a rather rough time of it last week. He was compelled to camp out, in weather that bore a, strong resemblance to yesterday’s on his last trip up, and, to add to the difficulty, Mr Bbyoe had a lady passenger. It seems that after leaving the Cabbage Tree Flat and safely negotiating one of the crossings of the Greta where there is no.bridge, the next proved; too ugly, and after prospecting up and down with the view of getting a ford for the horses, even if the buggy had to be left, Mr Boyce had to give it up, and determined to steer back to Mrs Gibbs’, a well-known house on the Cabbage Tree Flat. Unfortunately the crossing, whieh had been safely forded easier in the day, was now impassable, and ; there was nothing for it but to camp. A roadman’s deserted hut was found, and the passenger having luggage with her, made herself as comfortable as possible under the circumstances. Our correspondent at Rakaia writes:— No little surprise was occasioned yesterday by the non-arrival of the train from Methven. The guard arrived in the township about mid-day, and stated that the station yards at Methven are covered with water to the depth of Sin. The line at Oairnbrae and Lyndhurst is also under water.—Our correspondent atLeeeton writes: —Between 8 a.in. and 12 p.m'. on Sunday a heavy rainfall occurred in this district, the record of the nan gauge shewing 2.32 inches. ’Since Friday night a total or 2.576 inches has fallen.

The Soup Kitchen.— lt may be considered 1 as a sign of the improvement ox the times that the number of applicants for relief ftt the above institution lias been gradually -but steadily lessening during the past week or two. !

Widows and Obphans.— On Thursday evening, July 20, the members of the Ancient Order of Foresters are to give—in the Theatre Boyal—their annual performance for the benefit of the Widows and Orphans Fund, The Mayor and the members of the City Council have signified their intention to give their patronage on the occasion, as in former years.

Aobxouwubal and Pasxobai Association, —The Committee of the above Association have under consideration the erection of a permanent building on their grounds, in order to contain exhibits of New Zealand manufactures. The want of such a building has long been felt, both by tbe Committee and exhibitors. In addition to the private prizes already offered, a gentleman has kindly given a piece of plate of the value of five guineas for the best collection of dressed flax ropes, twine, cornsaoks, gunny-begs, and woolsacks, made from flax grown m Now Zealand. The same donor has alio given a piece of plate, value five guineas, for tbe best collection of New Zealand manufactured woollen goods. North Kowai Side School.— lt is reported that the Local Committee have had their attention drawn to the very mall attendance at this school, and almost suggesting the advisability of its being closed, seeing that the new side school now being bnilt in the western part of the district will shortly be available, it would be unfortunate for the children to lose the school instruction in the interval, and as tbe economy would not be much the residents in tbe vicinity hope the Committee will be in favour of its remaining open for the present. It is understood that no proposition has been made to the Board to divide the district as has been reported, and as the new side school pannot hope at present to have a very large teaching staff; the efficiency of the school would probably be better maintained if under the supervision of a first-class teacher, in fact, mode preparatory. The elder scholars could then (as they advance in years) attend at the main school at Amberley.

A meeting of the Kalapoi Orange Lodge is announced to be held on Friday evening, to consider the mode of celebrating their anniversary. A general meeting of the Eastern Football Cmo will be held in Collins' Hotel, on Wednesday, at eight o’clock.

A meeting of the Car’eton ’ Sparrow Club will he held this evening, in the Schoolroom, at 7.30. A meeting will be held on Thursday evening next, at the Public Library, to consider the rules of the Canterbury Society of Arts, The annual meeting of the shareholders of the Union Fire and Marine Insurance Company of Mew Zealand will be held at noon to-day. The monthly meeting of the Kaiipoi Farmers’ Club, will be hold on Thursday evening, when Mr A. Williams will read a paper. In an advertisement, Messrs A eland, Campbell and Co. annonree they have received censignments of Indian Teas, and they invite their friends and the public generally to meet them at the Oddfellows’ Hall, Lichfield street, on Thursday next, at 3 p m , to test the quality and flavour of the various sorts. Ladies are specially ii.vited.

GiiASS Bails.—The glass sleepers to which we referred some time ago as undergoing a trial on one of the metropolitan tramway lines have proved so useful that it is proposed to make the rails of Siemen’s hardened glass, and by making rail and sleeper in one, to overcome the principal difficulty of the tram* way companies.—London Echo. Liberal Government, and Liberal Finances. —Just now, says a contemporary, when the finances of the Colony furnish the principal if not the only topic of discussion, it would be very desirable that some statement of the comparative cost of Libeial and Conservative Governments should be circulated amongst the electors. An admirable model for such a statement is to be found in a small publication (now before us) issued by the National Reform Union of Manchester. The author is Mr Lewis Appleton, of Birmingham, and in a most emphatic manner he sets forward figures damaging to Toryism. It is startling to hear that the sum total of the surpluses during the brilliant administration of Mr Gladstone is £16,947,944, and that during fourteen years of power the Liberals repealed or reduced taxes to the amount of £43,816,329. Stem facts like these are worth a bushel of argument. The New Zealand Cable.—The following return shows the amount of business transacted by the cable between the various Colonies and the outside countries during 1879 : —Victoria, messages received, 4194 ; value, £36,866 9s Id, South Australia, 1887 ; value, £11,207 18s. Now South Wales, 3081; value, £18,470 16s. Queensland, 343 ; value, £2113 19s 4d. Tasmania, 153; value, £693 19s lOd. New Zealand, received 1628; value,£l2,Bßll2s Id. Western Australia, 160; value, £745 8s lid. Total, 11,446 j value, £82,980 3s 3d. Messages transmitted, Victoria, 3174; value, £28,369 Os lid. South Australia, 1324; value, £7740 4s 7d. New South Wales, 2961; value, £22,364 18s sd. Queensland, 347 j value, £2222 6s 7d. Tasmania, 97; value, £561 3s 2d. New Zealand, messages transmitted, 1541 ; value, £12,758 17s 6d. Western Australia, 133; value, £743 6s Id. Total, .9582; value, £74,759 10s 3d. The total number of messages sent altogether was 21,028 ; value, £157,740 2s 6d. Unhappy Victims. —“Alas! regardless of their doom, the little victims play.” Had the poet Gray, writes the Wellington Chronicle, lived in Wellington, instead of S:oke Poges, he would have written his celebrated lines not to “ a distant view of Eton College,” but to a distant view of the Norfolk at Wellington wharf. Here we have a number of presumably respectable persons brought out, many of them at Government expense, leaving respectable positions at Home under the mistaken impression that they can do better in Wellington. It is simply disgraceful, and personally discreditable to the Minister of Immigration, that he should not only permit, but, in his place in Parliament, extenuate the conduct of such men as Judge Bathgate, Arthur Olayden, and “ Captain ” Barry, by whose false statements people are induced to breakup their homes and emigrate. Let Mr Bolleston, with his peoksuiffian and jaunty air, consider this fact: That within 24 hours of the Norfolk arriving at the wharf, several persons actually applied to the Benevolent Institution for relief. Comment on this is unneeded. Reported Massacres at Mandalay Denied. —The Times of India, of April 24 says : Some days ago we remonstrated with the Calcutta papers for publishing sensational telegrams from Burmah, which were most obviously untrue. They not only killed the king of Burmah, but they sacrificed 700 human beings, chiefly girls. But monarcbs, even in Mandalay, do not die in this hole and corner fashion, and a telegram from a paper of the calibre of the Rangoon journals is scarcely high authority on a matter of this importance. Some native at Mandalay originated, we presume, the story of the Bing’s death and the massacres, and as the story rolled it swelled into the “ Terror at Mandalay," until the Calcutta papers were hoaxed into writing formal obituary notices of King Thoabaw. We are now able to formally deny what we before pointed out as self-evidently false. Messrs Wallace and Co favoured us yesterday with the following letter, which may bo taken to settle the question:—“With reference to the rumours of disturbances at Mandalay that have been published recently in some Indian papers, wo have received the following telegram from one of our firm at present in - Mandalay.-—'King of Burmah is in perfect health, has never been ill, is holding two audiences daily. Mandalay perfectly quiet. There have been no massacres.’ ” And yet the most ample and ghastly details have been supplied! The Statesman's correspondent at Rangoon throws additional light on the matter. He telegraphs under date April 22:—“There is no reliable Mandalay nows except that it seems that Theebaw is aliye- Human sacrifices are denied, but many people are said to be missing, and the panic is'general at Mandalay. The Burmese Government ascribe it to four drunkards having seized some people, and committed rbbbery. They were ordered to be publicly | beaten round the city. It is thought here that such a.panio could .hardly be caused by, four drunkards, and that the stoppage of trade would not have ensued without reasonable cause.” ’

ICmxgeation. —Mr George Yesey Stewlrt of Katikati, in a letter dated London Arn-ii 22, and published-in the Bay of l>k n hj Times, thus alludes to the prospects of i mtn “ gration to New Zealand i—“ There is at p re . sent an enormous competition going on f or onr surplus population, South Africa, l owa in America, and Manitoba in Canada, each offering special inducements, and I regret to state that, in consequence of so many un suitable persons having recently left for New Zealand, with a few pounds in their pockets and who, being either broken down tradesmen or other unfortunates, have, as a matter of course, not succeeded, such men sent back anything but satisfactory reports of the Colony. Still the prestige of my two former past successes will secure success in ih e present instance, I have, however, lost by the delay ; several desirable families who had been posted for Te Puke by my agent W* left fur lowa and Manitoba,’*

Tna Austbaiians’ Challenge to Ekglaud,—Commenting on Alexander’s challenge “Bobin Hood,” in the Amtralanan save under date London, May 7:—“ There could not have been a better stroke of policy, because it would be idle to deny that there is still amongst the public, as well as amongst cricketers, a lot of ill-feeling against Au.-tra-lian cricketers generally, not only about the Lord Harris row (although that of course added fuel to the fire) But also btciu« e erroneously or not, the first team were accused of being too much for the ‘ gate ’—at least their opponents flora are never tired of saying and writing so. Now, Alexander’s letter smooths things over, and throws the entire blame on English cricketers if, after so generous and fair an offer, they do not manage to arrange a date and a team. All is left to them—their own terms, their own dates, i heir own ground. If, after this, England will not meet Australia on level terms, at lc-a--t A UB . tralia can say she did her level best to bring about a meeting, and Australians may well refuse to believe it was impossible to manage. Where there’e a will there's a way, and if no match takes place it is because English cricketers are unwilling, and not because they are unable to bring it about.” Pbopeblt Punished.—A singular incident is recounted in the Wanganui papers. A couple were seized with a longing to revisit the Old Country, and returned, enjoying themselves pleasantly till the funds began to run out. To return to New Zealand was the chief desideraium , hut unfortunately the cash balance did not represent value enough to cover the cost of passage money for the whole of the family. With an evident desire to encourage the exertions of the Immigration Department the following plan was decided upon. The head of the family with one child used the bulk of the cash fo pay for passages by one of the ordinary traders. The maternal head was left with three other children to come out as immigrants at tbe cost of the Colony, Tbe husband left England, and in due time arrived in Wanganui and resumed business. The wife was not' so fortunate, for on applying for passage, the Immigration Department found out that once before they had the pleasure of forwarding her to New Zealand, and in consequence further assistance was denied. The result of the trip, therefore, is moat disastrous. The husband and one child are in Wanganui, very badly off, while the wife and three children are in England, also without money and without friends, and therefore unable to join her husband.

And a Good Judge Too —The Resident Magistrate’s Court at Wanganui was recently the scene of an amusing case. Mr Willis a bookseller and stationer, who conducted his own case, because, as he said, a feeling of professional etiquette had made the various legal gentleman unwilling to appear, and sued Edward Hardcastle, district judge, for £2 10s, balance due on a wig sold and delivered. It appeared that at defendant’s request plaintiff had booked an order: “ 1 Eavenscroft patent horsehair barrister’s wig, best quality, size of hat 6f. High tin box, lettered outside, ‘Mr District Judge Hardcastle’ —a frizzy wig, not woolly." In due time the wig arrived from Melbourne, but the defendant objected to it as a non-ventilating article, a woolly wig, and old-fashioned. Mr S. T. Fitzherbert, who produced hia own wig in Court as a specimen of the correct Ravenscroft article, averred that the article in dispute was heavy, cumbersome, old-fashioned, and, in fact, one which no gentleman nowadays would wear. As an illustration of the various styles in barristers’ wigs another was placed on the table, probably borrowed from a theatrical wardrobe, and described as a venerable monster, that looked as if it had seen a lot of villany in its time, but was now In the sere and yellow leaf. It appeared the original cost of the article was £5 15s, of which Judge Hardcastle had paid £3 ss, and the plaintiff sued for the balance. Judgment was given for the defendant.

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Bibliographic details

TOWN & COUNTRY., Lyttelton Times, Volume LIV, Issue 6040, 6 July 1880

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4,536

TOWN & COUNTRY. Lyttelton Times, Volume LIV, Issue 6040, 6 July 1880

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