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TOWN AND COUNTRY.

Tim Nmv Zealand Bar.—Among the gentlemen lately admitted to practise at the New Zealand Bar our readers will have observed the name of Dr. Foster, L.L.D., recently arrived from England. As the learned gentleman's position at home is pretty well known here we have no difficulty in stating the following particulars:—Dr. Foster was a native of the town of Cambridge, but being excluded by his religious convictions from that University, entered himself in London at University College, and eventually graduated as M.A. and L.L.D. at the University of London. He obtained considerable distinction in the Law Classes, taking the prizes in Equity and International Law, the Law Scholarships of the University, and the third Law Fellowship of his College, in immediate succession to Judge Hargreave, whom also he followed in the.Professorship of Jurisprudence. He tendered his resignation of this office on accepting a position which promised' to involve him in public political controversy, but retained it on receiving, through Professor de Morgan, the unanimous request of his colleagues to remain. He subsequently, however, resigned it on being appointed by Sir George Grey to a seat in the senate of the University, then vacant by the death of Admiral Beaufort. Upon the principle of representative government being ultimately conceded to the University by charter, he was elected by the graduates as the first presiding officer of their Convocation. The Liberal Reform Bill proposing to give a member to the University, Dr. Foster was named as candidate, in opposition to the Master of the Rolls and Sir Charles Locock, and had headed the poll at the close of a severe canvass when the Bill was withdrawn by the Government. Dr. Foster has also been for some [ years recognized among the M.P.'s on both sides of the House of Commons, as the organ of the Dissenting section of the liberal party, and students of the debates will remember the frequent mention of his name on what came to be called the " Liberation Wednesdays." Being examined before the Duke of Marlborough's committee, he was afterwards complimented by Mr. in the House, both for his ability and thorough frankness. Dr. Foster was a member of the Norfolk circuit, but in early life practised at the Chancery Bar and conveyancing. His public engagements withdrew him for some years from the ostensible practice of his profession, but he remained privately the legal as well as political adviser of his friends, and achieved a reputation for practical skill, which led to his being strongly recommended to the late Sir George Lewis for the position of Parliamentary Counsel to the Home Office. He had resumed practice for about three years, at the bar of his circuit and at the Courts at Westminster, when he decided upon accepting an invitation to try his professional fortunes in New Zealand. I

Licensed Victuallers'Association.—A meeting of the members of this association was held on Thursday evening last, at Parker's Hotel, Casliel street. The chair was occupied by Mr. G. H. Tribe, and a large number of members were present. The chief business before the meeeting was the election of officers for the ensuipg year. The following were elected:—President, Mr. J. G. Ruddenklau; Treasurer, Mr. Parker; Committee, Messrs. B. N. Jones, Morton, Blake, and Oram. It was decided that a fee of £25 per annum should be paid to the secretary, Mr. F. C. Tribe being appointed to that office. The balance sheet was produced and agreed to. The meeting adjourned until the first Thursday in July. For the information of the members of the society we may mention that meetings will be held for the future on the first Thursday in each month. Princess' Theatre.—On Thursday night, the drama of " Pauline," was reproduced at this theatre, with the afterpiece of " Slasher and Crasher." The house was well attended. Last night " Miriam" was played; as we have already given a notice of this piece, it is unnecessary to enter into any detailed account of it. It is a very pretty little drama, and was very well put upon the stage. It is the

production of Mr. H. S. Craven's facile pen. and we

are promised another piece from the same source, entitled "Our Nelly," which will shortly be produced. Mr. Shiel Barry, who is well and favourably known as a capital representative of Irish character, has arrived in Canterbury, and will, we believe, shortly make his appearance. Canterbury Agricultural and Pastoral Association. —With reference to the movements of this society Ave learn from the Canterbury Standard of Friday that " a meeting of the committee was held on Tuesday, Mr. Robert Wilkin in the chair. The Secretaryjstated that he had called a special meeting

for the purpose of considering a letter received from the contractor for the posts and rails for the stockyards, but that a quorum had not attended. He had however, consulted the members within his reach' and had written a letter which he now laid before them, by which he had to a certain extent deviated from the original letter of the contract. The deviation was greatly in favour of the contractor, but he had refused to accept it, and the Secretary had, in consequence, instructed Messrs. Louis, Travers and Hanmer, the agents for the Association, to sue the contractor on theoriginalcon tract. The con tractor's agent luid now recognised the agreement as amended by the secretary, and the Society was in a position to commence the erection of their stockyards. The committee approved of the proceedings of the secretary, and instructed him to obtain contracts for the building'of the stockyards in whole or in part, as the funds might allow. Messrs. Wilson and the Secretary were authorised to lay out the grounds in conjunction with a surveyor in such a manner as would enable the Association to let such portions as might not be required for the purposes of the Association at some future date with advantage, the corner being reserved as the site for a public house. The Secretary also stated that the medals for the last and ensuing year had been ordered from England through Mr. Coatea, and might soon be expected. Some other routine business was transacted, and the committee adjourned." Timaru.—A trotting match camc off on Tuesday the 31st May, between Mr. 11. Walden's bay cob' Tommy, and Mr. J. Gibson's grey Gelding Grey Donnell, for a stake of .£SO aside. The course was over the hills from Pighunting Creek to the Commercial Hotel, Timaru, a distance of about five miles. Ihe pony took the lead at starting, was never headed, and won easily by more than 100 yards. The betting was three to one on the pony, and a large amount of money was laid out at that price. Ihk llavelock Mail.—We hate received l»y the Wanganui a copy of the first number of this paper, which has been started to supply the wants of the new digging town of llavelock in Marlborough, There are some valuable items of information which we shall be glad to quote in our next issue. The design of the conductors as to the future is thus expressed "Jn a rising town like Haveloclc, and in the face of the increasing population which is almost hourly landed on the shores of Marlborough a newspaper is urgently required; and feeling this the proprietors of this journal have launched

then boat. At present its size is necessarily somewhat circumscribed; but as Rome was not built in a day, so must newspapers gradually unfold

themselves. We will promise to keep pace with the times, and as a larger sized paper is required it shall be at once published. We only hope, as we believe, that we may soon be put to proof in this respect, and our readers will find we shall gladly keep our word. In conclusion, all we ask is that the public will give us a fair stage and no favour—we will trust to our own exertions to ensure their future patronage." The paper is well got up and edited, reflecting credit upon Messrs. Henry Blundell and Co., whose names appear in the imprint, and who can have found it no light task to bring out a journal in so short a space of time.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

TOWN AND COUNTRY., Lyttelton Times, Volume XXI, Issue 1245, 4 June 1864

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1,377

TOWN AND COUNTRY. Lyttelton Times, Volume XXI, Issue 1245, 4 June 1864

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