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THE BISHOP OF BOND STREET INCONSOLABLE FOR HIS DOG.

At Bow street Police-court, on Monday, Mr. W. Love, chief officer of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, accompanied by Mr. Bishop, of New Bond street, applied to Mr. Corrie for a summons against a lady named Hicks for causing a valuable dog to be cruelly destroyed under the following circumstances:—lt appeared that Mr. Bishop, the owner of the dog, called at Gray's Inn square, about a week ago, leaving the dog in his cab, with particular directions for the cabman to look after it:. When he returned to the cab he found that the dog had been permitted to escape, and besides causing every inquiry to be made, he advertised in the papers and printed bills offering a reward for the recovery of the animal. Subsequently it came to the knowledge of Mr. Bishop that a Miss Hick, an elderly lady, residing in Southampton buildings, had seen the dog in Gray's Inn square, and had given some man a sixpence to destroy it,' because it was panting at the mouth,' and appeared 'likely to faint.' The man who killed the dog lived in North-mews, near Miss Hicks'residence, and it had been ascertained that she had previously employed him on similar business. She was connected in some way with a " Dogs' home," but the society altogether repudiated her acts in adopting such measures, instead of causing stray dogs to be taken to the "Home." Miss Hicks justified her conduct by alleging that the dog, in her opinion, was going mad; but there was not the slightest reason for this presumption, and, as it appeared to be a favorite pastime of the lady, it was considered desirable, for the protection of all dogowners, that her proceedings should be checked. Mr. Corrie —" But you ask for a summons on the ground of •cruelty.' The question then is, Mr. Bishop, did she cause the dog to be put to death in a cruel manner ?" " The man first tried to hang the poor animal, and failing in this, knocked it on the head. I assure you it is the greatest blow that has ever been inflicted on me and my family." Mr. Corrie : " Possibly the lady may have been mistaken, but you cannot show any intentional ' cruelty.' " Mr. Bishop (greatly excited)—" Was it not' cruelty' to me—to my niece—to all my family? 4 Love me, love my dog.' It has broken up our peace and happiness at home. We would not have parted with the dog for half a million of money. Is a woman to go unpunished for such a crime as this ? for deliberately killing an innocent, beautiful, h' l |™~ less dog, because it was merely 'panting' a little? Mr. Corrie—"l can make some allowance for your feelings, and if they can be soothed by pecuniary compensation, no doubt you can proceed against the lady by action for damages; but it does not come within my province to interfere at all in the case." r .„ Mr Love said lie feared there was a difficulty in the case, the lady having acted from a mistakenand not a malicious motive; but Mr. Bishop^was v y anxious that the society should investigate the matter, and he had done so. Mr. Corrie—" I am very sorry that it has happened; but cruelty to the animal must be shown, not to the owner. The act does not deal with the lacerated feelings of individuals." Mr. Bishop-"Feelings! This dog was my life, my wife's life, my niece's life. I would sooner have lost every gun in my shop." . . The applicant then retired, but returning almost immediately, with his own Act of Parliament in his hand, he said—." A thought has occurred to me, sir. Cannot I charge this woman with ' stealing my dog; she hires a man to take it from Gray's Inn-square to' a mews in Southampton-buildings, there- to be fcruelly killed. Is not that an act of felony?"

Mr. Con-Hi—" ('erfainiy not, unless you can show that she did so for riie sake of possessing its skin or •arcase. At al! events, I should not commit a person on such a charge. I am aware that you obtained ilie Act, but you cannot find a clause to that effect in it. As I said before, the lady may have acted very improperly, I give no opinion on that point; but I am certain you cannot charge her with ' cruelty' or ' felony.'"

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/LT18631105.2.20

Bibliographic details

THE BISHOP OF BOND STREET INCONSOLABLE FOR HIS DOG., Lyttelton Times, Volume XX, Issue 1152, 5 November 1863

Word Count
747

THE BISHOP OF BOND STREET INCONSOLABLE FOR HIS DOG. Lyttelton Times, Volume XX, Issue 1152, 5 November 1863

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