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ENGLISH SPORTING NEWS.

THE * DERBY,

This Teat national event came; off on Wednesi., ■ ifay 23, before an assemblage of 200,000 1 '''\fcitors. We take the following from the report 2'tlio"HonieNewß.".-.;--::.:-i" TmfDeuby Stakes1 of'so' soys. each, h. ft:, for 3-yr-olds; colts, Bst. 71b.; fillies,.Bst. 31b. The second to receive 100 sbvs. out 6f; the stakes. Last mile and a half. 224 subs. Jlr Jinny's Thormanby ..../. V(Custance)': 1 i\lr. Nichol's The Wizard ............(A..French). 2 <\,'tain Christie's Horror ............(Challoner) 3 Count F. De Lagrange's Dan'gu'...(J. Quinton) . 4

The following also mi,,. but were not placed : — Jlainstone. Cramond, Drone, Nutbourne, Sutton, Bi'iitinck, Leprochaun, Sir William, Restes, Cape Flyaway, The llap, Wallace, The Tiger, Man-at-Ann-s Buccaneer, Tom Bowline, Lanchester, Vesta, Umpire, Brother to Rainbow, Loiterer,. Largesse, Wiiiton, The Rising Sun,. Ebony, and High TreaThe Race.—At exactly, 25 min.utes prior to the time of starting, the numbers of the 30 competitors were displayed on the telegraph board. The horses assembled at the post with the utmost, punctuality;' and walked in a body towards " tjie starter. JTust Move reaching him, however/ Leprochauri, .Brother to Rainbow, Tiger, Umpire, the Rap;'and f twp ;orV three others, broke away, and the ; rank had to ' be' re-formed. This proceeding was soon'accomplished,. and the ringing of the bell announced the start even before a large majority of the spectators were prepared for it,; ahd the clamoiiriri the Grand Stand J enclosure suddenly ceased. The roar of excitement' which was sent up as soon as the' hoftes quitted the' post became hushed in: an instant, andVwmle'." every!; tongue was silent, every eye/was strained to discover the position of .the favorites, Behtinck was the first to show prominently iiVthe race, and' he took a clear-lead'as the horses ascended the hill;; following directly'in his track were'M^n-at-arms/! Nutbourne, Rising Sim, arid Restes. In the ex-" tveme rear were Sutton,-Largesse, and Loiterer. Bentinck increased his lead half-a-dozen lengths on ; going up the hill; but before reaching, the mile post he disappeared from1 the front, and Restes, who had been heading the tuck, took, up thei running with Jfatboiirii.e,—-.-Horror—Rising—San,—Man-at-^ Aims, Buccaneeivßrother to Rainbow, Thormariby, The Wizard; Dangu, and Umpire taking' theirV places at the head of the ruck; On coming roiirid Tattenham-corner the front lot' were in close com-; pany, Nutbourne next the rails having, "perhaps/a slight lead, with Restes;; The "Wiz'iird;: Umpire,' Buccaneer, Thormanby, Brother to Rainbowj and Horror, well'up in his stride/ On 'crossing tlie.; road Nutboiirne: broke down "and was pulled.up,-, and soon after Restes was-beaten.' /Wizard then came to the front, and running in' the middle of the course took a clear lead; followed: by/Thoiv: manby, Dangu,. and Horror. ' ftt" the distance, Thormanby passed the" .Wizard without ,an; effort, and Honor took third place' half way tip. : Prom the moment that Thormanby's; colours were in advance, howeverj the issue'of'the*racei was" not in doubt. He ran home an easy winner, by a 'length and a half, four lengths separated the second from the third, and four lengths theithird from the fourth. The " running up " horses were, Sir 'William, Umpire, Buccanber, Man-at-arms,', Cape Flyaway,' arid Eestes, who passed the post' nearly in the order named; Loiterer and Wallace were the last two. Thormanby was twiceriearlyicnocked on his; headi and Wallace had a narrow escape Vdf falling the instant the flag 'was'dropped ;: " ■ ' "■ '

The Dekby.—' Bell's LifeV says':—" The pace was very bad" 'for the 'first' half milej when it im-, proved, and the time was four seconds faster, than last year, which, though not 'first-rate,' told its Hale so effectually that not a single horse, this .year galloped into the paddock to pull up. M'r/TehJßroeck. stood a 'screamer' on tFmpire,"but-Ksbby'ievery: other horse in the race, except Horror;; Miv Merry?* who backs his horses very heavily when in earnest, is reported to win between £70,000 and £80,000, and his present triumph—the object of his ambition— will atone for the-disappointments occasioned by the unaccountable defeat of Hobbie; Noble '-(for. whom he gave the late Lord John.Scbtt the unprecedented sum of 6500 guineas when a 2-year bid) i" Lamel O'Rourke's year, and of Lord of the Isles' more recently. After Mr. Merry, the chief winners on the race are Mr. Payne, Colonel: Ouseley Higgins (who executed a portion of the stable1 commission), Mr. Buchanan, and Mr. Graham Smithy the wtter of whom ' throws in' for- £10,000-: There are i« w c i everer ]ighfc we i g hts'; thaa Gustance, who has fully warranted: the'confidence1 reposed' ln h. lm h both owner and toairier on this occas.on, and to carry off the Derby at his age _ (19) ■ s a teat that no other jockey has ever accomplished f w. a. s a. sseel 'cc of luck, likewise, for John Sharp to • uinble lntf> such a 'good thing'-after-his'long jouiney Nutbourne broke down in the near forejcg, in the foot of which he was wicked a fortnight jeiore the race, nnd was- going sowell^at the time ; m a neral opinion prevails that he would have won—what they say of all horses who meet with a a rmJar fate. The ' settling' promises to be a most factory one, notwithstanding the large sums in« wi i_ be required to - meet ■ Mri Merry's and oie,. s chums, astl.e winner, who, was, one of the wiliest fancies' of the' public, is generally eoriJIS i t H l''"1683 horse fop the rihg.'?;-; The:; * Illusuatetl London News' says that Thormanby twice weneapordised his chance by stumblingflltiis m tie jockey, who.carried some 221b. of saddleI'and waaie-olothn, and never rode in a Derby before, i covered him very cleverly. It is said that Heerian rtoodto win £1100 upon Umpire, but, like; Mr. ion Broeck, he did not come to see him in:'the maook. Tom Sayers• was also in the stand; and, wvmg now determined to cultivate the arts''of vo£i'me«.agoodbeginnins:^

THE OAKS, MAY 25. „ ; „.-., S ' ■„,. / 11°#?- Stakes ' of 50 soys. each, h'.ft., for 3 yr. owl fillies, Bst. 71b. each. The second to receive J-UQ hoys. out of the stakes, and the winner to P^y 100 soys. towards the police and regulations of the course, and,3o soys. to, the judge... Last mile and a half.. 156 subscribers.;.;/ ( ,J -! * -

„...;;|;..;J;Snowaen : i MrJT.-Parr!^Avalftnche .....;..-.:...;;..-.iWells 2 Mr. Groville's Contadina ............L.Snowden 3 t^-: A'unilton's Rupee ,. ;i .....J. Goater- : 4 : o TThpfollowingJalao. ran : Seolusion,Sagita,Emily, btockade,,,Cheesecake,. Vesta, Aurora, Viatica,,Ellington.

Allington waa first oiF, followed by Vesta, and soon they were side by side, Seclusion, who got badly off, bringing up the rear. At.the top of the hill Cheesecake was beaten, and Seclusion began to .run through her horses. Viatica led into the straight, followed by Rupee, Aurora, Avalauche, Contadina, and Butterfly. At the distance Avalanche was in front and .Contadina behind. Half way. up, the distance the .winner came and won by half a length, two lengths between the second and third, a neck between the third and fourth. Seclusion, AuroraandSagitta were next close together.

•": '^'>1-' ■''■-THE ASCOT! CUP, JUNE 7. - ■''■:'-■■'■'■ The;,, Gold, Cup, by subscription of, 20 soys, each, with; ; 2oo soys., added' from the ; fund.- If; five subscribers, r the Cup to be of 300 soys. value; *n^ .if;;2o,"tne- second to receive 50 soys. out of the stakes; 3yr.olds, 6st. 101b.: four, Bst. 51b.; five, 2st. ; six^and aged, 9st. 31b.; mares and geldings allowed 31b. To start at Cup post, .and "• gVonce round. About two miles and a* half." '• Mr. Hamilton's Rupee ........J...H. Grimshaw 1 Mr.Eastvlrbdd'sßuttei-fly Challoner 2 Mr; W; Day's The Promised Land,::.;..A. Day; 3 Lord Stamford'^ Newcastle;'..;.i;..G; Fordham 4 Baron Rothschild's Magnum .....;,...!,....Wells. 5 Sir:C/;Mondk's Gatnester;V;;;.v........;;iAldcrofti' M MrjSwindell'aWeatherboundv.t^.^^-Adams £7

The running was made by Weatherbound, wlio carried iton'past the Stand, with Magnum second, Thi Promised Land third, Rupee fourth,?and Newcastle fifth, -Gamester bringing up the rear. They ran in this order, with little variation, to the Swinley oourse;Jwhei'e The Promised Land was seen in front, Weatherbound lying second, Eupee third. Butterfly and Magnum next/ Some distance in the rear followed .Newcastle and Gamester. Rupee and Butterfly kept close order with The Promised Land to the distance, where they began to separate, Rupee ultimately winning by a head; four lengths between the second and third; bad fourth. An objection was lodged against the winner by the owner of Butterfly, on the ground of a 'jostle,' but it was not sustained. . ;; ; , ;:.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/LT18600901.2.20

Bibliographic details

Lyttelton Times, Lyttelton Times, Volume XIV, Issue 815, 1 September 1860

Word Count
1,366

ENGLISH SPORTING NEWS. Lyttelton Times, Volume XIV, Issue 815, 1 September 1860

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