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OUR STREETS.

To the Editor of the Lyttelton Times.

" And if you stick in the mud, stand still."; -■-/—•••; - -■-' '7 Oi,i> Song.

Sib,—As a young colonist, I am Somewhat desirous of ; knowing the principles upon which the public works of:our town are conducted, and should feel obliged to you or any of your correspondents for enlightenment. ......... , ; , 7 ,

During: the late rainy weather, the state ; of our streets has been worse than I have ever seen in any town or village, English or Colonial, that I haive visited /indeed in some.places all but impassable. Is it riot strange, that before spending some .£30,000 in making a road to Christcliurch via Sumner, for one gentleman once to play at tandem driving upon, the authorities did riot deem it expedient to pay attention to the streets of the town itself-?/-: 7.:: ..-.:.:.:,- ■ ;.-,-,: -■■' '.- ; ;. ; :,/ : .;; ;

And now that we have in progress • shafts for a tunnel through the hilt with a viewto the formation of a railway, which, whether advisable or not, must necessitate a very heavy outlay, what is the condition of our home thoroughfares ? Norwich' quay is a filthy slough; Oxford, street worse than any newly ploughed field/London street an alternation of watery mud and muddy water, and the rest, inferior to the roads through any country village in England. I was informed, a: few days ago, by the occupant of a store on Norwich quay, that, some time since, upon his commencing to mend the miserable pathway in front of his premises, with a barrow load or two of shingle from the beach; he was threatened with the terrors of the law, first by, the Collector of Customs for daring to improve his own frontage, and next by the harbour master, for robbing the shore of the bay of a few pebbles.*

; Yet, on passing in the dark, on; Saturday night last, iuLondon Street/between Mr/Wormald's and the shop next in the direction of the- post office, I found myself stuck fast: in a slough of liquid: mud of at least a foot deep, from which I had some difficulty in extricating myself, and which I understand has been made by some individual who is building there, for his own purposes. ...... ' ,

Now/haying a touch of Yankeeism in my nature,I want to know, is it the law iri-Lyttelton that : any man may mar but may not mend the public paths before his own property? And if he may not mend them, in whom is the authority to do so vested? and why is it not exercised ? -

In Oxford street, in the centre of the .crossing between London street and the Sumner road, is another swamp of even worse description* where the unwary traveller, groping: his way ;in the usual pitchy darkness, finds himself suddenly engulfed nearly to his knees, :

By the way, cannot the inhabitants of Lyttelton afford a few oil lamps he«e and there, to guide people through the wilderness of rock, quarry, and morass? Where are* our commissioners of paving and lighting? and. if they /don't exist, why don't they?:-- ' ■•: '■'-'• '■ ■■'„ ■■ :■■ ;■.-.:;

Winchester street, the least used in the town, is from some strange cause by far the best attended to; yet even there, one has. the choice of two evils: either to run the risk of slipping off the high and sloping pathway, or to stagger along in peril and. discomfort among the small boulders thrown down as metal? ...

This elicits in my mind another question: "Areour "J. p;s joking when they sentence offenders to hard labour? From what I have seen of the proceedings of the latter I ani inclined to fancy so, and think,that a little extra exertion in the stone breaking department would tend greatly to the improvement of. our streets, without endangering the : health of the prisoners by overfatigue. Hoping my questions may not be deemed impertinent, ....... -;- „ i

lam, sir, Yours faithfully, .'.'.< YOUNG LYTTELTON. 7 ■* A friend of mine is rather giveri to collecting specimens on the; beach, and he wants to know if he is liable to fine or imprisonment for bringing home the pebbles: to which they may be attached, as it seems a serious matter. ; '

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/LT18600623.2.18.1

Bibliographic details

OUR STREETS., Lyttelton Times, Volume XIII, Issue 795, 23 June 1860

Word Count
686

OUR STREETS. Lyttelton Times, Volume XIII, Issue 795, 23 June 1860

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