Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

CHRISTCHURCH ELECTION.

■'. •.-■-.' ■■ . i „ > .THIS NOMINATION.

The nomination of candidates lor the representation of Christciiuich in the. House of Representatives, took place on Wednesday hist in the To.w.n Hall, Christchuivh. John Hall, Esq, Returning Officer, having read the writ, Mr. \l., PackpU, at some length, proposed; Mr. Henry SeweU as ; a fit and proper...person to represent the electors in the House of ■■Representatives.'■ In doing so 'he stated that he had accepted his se.it fur Christchurch in the ITouse of Representatives upon..the implied understanding that lie would at the proper time resign in favour of Mr. Sewell. Before he had done so he ha,d satisfied himself that Mr. Sewell's principles, re-, ipained unchaiiijed.. Jle did not consider. Mr. Hart a fit and proper person to represent the electors of Christchurch.

Mr. W. Wilson,'in a few words, seconded the nomination of Mr. Jewell.

Mr. Sutcuffe then proposed, find Mr. Tlees seconded the nomination of Mr. Michael, Brennau Hart as a fit find proper ..person to represent the electors of I he, Tovvii'of Cluistchurcli in the House of Representatives. ,

Mi'.-Sicwell then addressed the meeting. He had so recently stated his views to the electors Unit he would not occupy their time in recapitulating thorn. He bi'lievedthat explanation to have been acnorally satisfactory, except; t hut during his canvass he still ioumhiliij'i'ti'inir mistrust ijs to his ijifentjons respecting'the'railway.. ,He desired .to l>o ■explicit on that, point. He had expressed his disappvovul of th« nieasufps which had been proposed; hut he assured tlimn that, lie .\yould r not use any i inHiii'iu;B, which .hijliinight be, supposed to nossess , wiUi tliuiSsvo'utivo Gavcmmci^t tv iuducpificm to

disallow tiio bilk Asa member of the General Assembly he would do nothing to frustrate them if allowed j'on the contrary, in that case ifc would bo bis duty to sustain them, lie went further, and assured them .tint, if the present measure were disallowed, he would use lite liesf, endeavours towards getting the work accomplished in fomu moro prudent way. The basis of any such plan ought to be to set apart only a portion of tho bind'fund—nay.one-third— leaving two-thirds available for .other services (which were indispensably : required)-—and then to .borrow annually as much as would make up the amount required for a moderate annual expenditure. But as a member of the General Assembly he could do nothing. He admitted Mr. Hart needed not to apologise ior seeking to represent them. Jt was the privilege of.every elector. Jle (Mr. Sewell) bad asked their suffrages in the character of an old servant. Mr. Hart offered himself as a new one. It was true, as Mr. Hart said the otlier evening, that people' sometimes turned out an old servant; but they never took a new one into their employment without asking for a character. Mr. Hart's address was the only character which he offered to the electors. It contained nothing except a pledge that he would use bis efforts to obtain steam'communication with Melbourne. He was sure Mr. Hart would be glad to know that steps had been taken to anticipate his wishes. By the last mail lie had received a.letter from the principal director of the company, informing him of the intention to send out two more vessels to supply the requirements of the colony. Mr. Sewell then expressed his surprise that people, so much underrated ihe importance of the choice of their representatives in tie General Assembly. They had had sufficient experience on that point iv reference to the land fund, in former sessions. The next session was likely to be as important as any former one. They had aiight to demand from Mr. Hart a distinct statement of his views on the various important questions to which he had drawn their attention the oiher evening. What would he do to guard their land fund against the aggression of the. Northern Island? What as to the New Provinces Act, or separation, or native affairs? He suppor-ed Mr. Hart's answer would be the cry ' the tunnel and no progress !' as if that would satisfy reasonable men. As regards the tunnel question, he called upon Mr. Hart to state.how, as a member of the General Assembly, if elected, he would forward that measu -c? Had he made any calculations as to the revenues of ihe Province? After spending the £70,000 how did he mean to continue the work p—did he mean to propose taxation ? The electors had a right to know his views on these questions. If they decided on dismissing an.old servant, it was of course open to them to do so, but he tru.-ted that they would not take a new one into their service without a clear understanding as to his intentions. Mr. Haet said that he came forward not as a member of any political party or faction, but at the expressed wish of many of the electors of Christchurch. ' He was aware that other gentlemen had been asked to allow themselves to be put in nomination, but they had from various motives declined; and he now came forward because he had ample time to devote to legislative duties, and also because it was one of the rights to which as a citizen he he was entitled. He acknowledged that he was influenced by ambition to attain to so hijjh an honor as the. representation of the town of Christchurch in the General Assembly ; and he considered this fact one by no means to his discredit.' Was it not ambition which brought to light the brilliant talent of many of our most gifted men in public life For himself he would say that though he could not make the proud boast of having received a college education ut either of the great universities of Oxford or Cambridge, he had derived some knowledge from the college of common sense. At least I.c felt himself to be as fitted for the honour he'sought,, as the person t&- whom it had lately j been confided; he meant Mr Packer. As far as lie could see, their positions were similar in more points than one. Their avocations had at one time been similar, and he thought, he might without annoyance say that he believed his own abilities equal to those of Mr. Packer. That gentleman, it was known, had been a mere locum tenens for Mr. Sewell, to whom he had now handed over the constituency. He (Mr. Hart) objected to Mr. Sewell because he did not believe him to be politically honest. He was not a resident in the province, although at a meeting some time back at the Fleece he had stated that it was his intention to build a residence here and take up his abode among us. [Mr. Sewell here interrupted the sneaker, denying any such statement on his nart.] At the late meeting at the Town Hall, on Friday evening, the impression conveyed by Mr. Sewell's address was that he'was unfavourable to the railway ; but now at the eleventh hour, when he believed :his election to be jeopardised by those opinion's, he changed them and declared himself in favor of the railway. He (Mr. Hart) did not think that a perfect knowledge of past political events could be expected of him, but he could assure the electors that if returned he would earnestly make them bis study. Of the matters likely to come before the General Assembly in the ensuing session, he would be'prepared to take up strongly a position in opposition' to the present New Provinces Act. He would also strongly oppose any contemplated alteration in the existing Was.te Lands Begulations. The question of changing the seat of Government was one which would be better left to be more carefully and leisurely considered. He would give his cordial support to any properly digested scheme for the establishment of direct steam communication with Melbourne, having witnessed the beneficial effects of such a measure in Otago. He would do his utmost to pnsure the placing on a good footing.the postal sprvice of the colony. He-' verting to the railway—what, he would ask, would he the opinion of His Excellency's Government, if after having the railway approved by the Provincial Council almost unanimously,:. Hie electors were to send Mr. Sewell, a man known to be opposed to that scheme, to the . General Assembly? Would they not say,that the Provincial Council and -the-electors of Christchuroh were at issue on this-, point P Mr. Sewell had said that he was prepared with a better scheme than that now endorsed by the Council. He (Mr. Hart) would ask'the electors to consider which, was likely to be the better scheme, one emanating solely from Mr. Sewell, or one which had been well considered aad approved by the majority of the Provincial Council. No other candidate oame forward, and the Retu,r»ing. Officer, having called for a show of hands, declared it to be in favor of Mr. Sewell; whereupon Mr. Hart demanded a poll which was announced to take place on the following day, at the Town Hall, Christchurch.

:, On Thnrsdav the polling took place, commencing ■at v inne o'clock and ternnnating at 4 p.m. The [ polling place was at the Town Hall. Them was very little excitement appaient, t.lio cause probably being that so few of tlie constituenc}' were, on th« revised roll. This roll numbers about 160 names only, including those of absentees in England and, in distant parts of the province and cohmy. Only 110 votes were recorded. Although by'luw the result of the pull is not officially, declared until, uftor two days fn>m the'time of taking it, \\\wq was liitle ('ifllculty in coniiujj' to an exact under.standing as to the numbers' of votes recorded on eacli side. Aii exuet tally was kept a^ the doors, from ,wh»-h it appears that the result was— Mr. 11. Sew-U" ... ... 77 .alr.-M,'B. Hirt........ ... sfl. v.

The poll will be officially announced this dwhen it will be the duty of the Keturrrine oftuJ?' declare Mr. Sewell duly elected. 8 Un>l°

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/LT18600121.2.14

Bibliographic details

CHRISTCHURCH ELECTION., Lyttelton Times, Volume XIII, Issue 752, 21 January 1860

Word Count
1,665

CHRISTCHURCH ELECTION. Lyttelton Times, Volume XIII, Issue 752, 21 January 1860

Working