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The Lyttelton Times.

Saturday, January 14, 1860. The most selfish of reasons compels us to advocate the' Lyttelton and Christchurch tunnel and.railway. Quite apart from the public grounds on which any journal really representing the province would base its support of any useful public work, it is our lot to be intimately affected by the distance—more of time and trouble than of actual space— which separates the two towns. The most enlightened journal, taking Christchurch for its field of operations, must be cut off from the latest news from foreign parts which any chance arrival in port may bring with it. In Lyttelton the most active journalist must find himself obliged to omit ; through ignorance, all notice of events, however important they may be, which take place on the plains several hours previous to publication.

This difficulty haunts us; instances perpetually arise to trouble us j it seems as if events in the ineventful city of Christchurch selected, with malice prepense, the evenings of Tuesday and Friday in each week as the only proper times at which to occur. The Council used to be remarkably fond of a Tuesday; and when, especially, there was to be a grand debate, a dissolution of the Executive, or the announcement of new appointments, no other evening could by any possibility be made to serve. In consequence our wits were taxed to the utmost to present to Christchurch readers that page of history which had been last turned among them.

We say, therefore, that not only for the important public reason already so often discussed and urged by us, but also for the urgent reasons prompted by self-interest, our cry is— * Railway for Ever;' Away with the barrier which keeps apart the towns, and separates the outside of the province from the inside.

A peculiarly distressing instance of the grievance complained of is now presented. Last night a meeting of electors was to take place for the purpose of hearing an expression of opinion from a candidate for the representation of the town of Christchurch, in whose election not only the town but the province at large takes a <taen interest. Circumstanced as we are with reference to the place of this meeting, we are unable to furnish this morning a record of what took place. And yet we should have spared no pains to give a report, had it been possible, so close is the day of the election, and so important are the interests involved in it. We are obliged to. consider it an important question whether Mr. Sewell shallbe elected or refused, for the result of his election is to make him, not a mere representative, but a probable statesman and leader of a party. Now, as New Zealand contains very few such men, a constituency to whom the choice is given cannot be otherwise than very cautious that the state-craft of the candidate shall be employed to further their principles, and that his partizan talents shall not be used against them. It was with the ostensible purpose of declaring his sentiments to the electors of

Chrisfcchurch that jjhe meeting of last night was appointed by Mr, Sewell $ a proceeding the more necessary for him, because a thick impenetrable haze nas hitherto enveloped his relations with the tiublic.

Whether Mr. Sowell has succeeded in satisfying- the electors of Christcliurch or not we cnnnot say. If he has given them such an insight into his Tiews, such pledges of his intentions as will ft a future time form a guarantee for his ; conduct in those points which we all hold nost important, we shall be delighted j he is the man for the choice of Christchurch. But if there has been "anything" short of a d stinct understanding between Mr. Sewell i.nd the people whom he desires to represent; if there has been any hesitation or reservation where the electors have asked a plaia question; unless it be found that every important doubt has been unequivocally set at rest ; it will be the duty of Christchnrch to itself and the province at large to reject him.j Let us have Mr. Sewell pledged, or not at all.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/LT18600114.2.17

Bibliographic details

The Lyttelton Times., Lyttelton Times, Volume XIII, Issue 750, 14 January 1860

Word Count
694

The Lyttelton Times. Lyttelton Times, Volume XIII, Issue 750, 14 January 1860

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