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SPORTING INTELLIGENCE.

EPSOM SUMMEE MEETING.

Wednesday, June 1. The Ifeavy rains of the preceding afternoon had rendered the ■atmosphere cool and fragrant, and had prevented the dust from.rising under the wheels of carnages and the tramp of pedestrians. Soon after daylight the stream of people set in towards Epsom, and it rapidly swelled as noon approached, blocking up the streets and byeways to the course, until it broke and spread upon'.'the'Downs.'.'"The aspect of a Derby Day ii as been presented to the readers in so many shapes that wemiiy be spared the task of elaborate description. ■ Frith has painted the scene, and Montalembert has sketched it. The Grand (stand was more crowded than ever,',the; crush of carnages on the hill larger, the excitement deeper, and the fun and hilarity more boisterous than ever our remembrance can parallel. The first race excited i.o attention, it merely prepared the people for the great spectacle that was to follow. With that promptitude and discipline for which the A division ' of. police is celebrated,.the Coarse was soon cleared. The numbers were hoisted on, the telegraphic board sweepstakes hastily formed among the occupants of carriages on the hill, and the hum of excitement; and anxiety swelled into a roar which might have been heard for miles around. The' three leading favorites were pretty: firm, and Newcastle was also brought with some force into the market. No incident of speculation^ however, was so important as that which marked the steadiness of the three leading favorites. Sir Joseph Hawley and Wells were fortunate, the former in owning the winner of a Derby two years.in succession, and the latter urbemg able to ride. Wells, who met with a fearful accident at Chester, has quite recovered from his hurts. George Manning, who comes of a racing family, and who is the youngest brother of the well-known Clerk of the Scales, has had a share of fortune which rarely befalls any trainer. He has had Sir Joseph Hawley's horses under his care for barely three years, and "during that time-he has won two Derbies and some of the principal weight for age races. The " ring" are, of course, the chief losers bythe result of the race. The business of the meeting was well conducted. The following are details of . THE DEBBY. , The Derby Stakes of 50 so vs. each, for three-year* old colts and fillies; the second to receive 100 soys. out of the stakes, One mile and a half. 256 subs. Sir Joseph Hawley's br. c. Musjid (Wells) 1 Mr. Eastwood's eh. c. Ticket-of-Leave... „ (Oates) 2 Mr. Hill's Trumpeter .: (A. Day) 3 Mr. T,Eobinson's The Promised ■■•'., Land, ...,......;, ...(W. Day) 4 The following also ran: Marionette, Volcano, Gallus, Glenbuck, Glenluce, Bankrupt, Schuloff, Bro. to Sydney, Phantom, Electric, Gaspard, Gladiolus, Nimrod, Reynard, Newcastle, Defender, Balnamoon,"Bed Eagle, Napoleon, Lord of the Manor, Sir Hercules, Lovett, Polonius, Enfield, Highwayman,. Gamester. ' Betting: oto 4 against Musjid, 7to 2 Promised Land and Trumpeter, 14 to 1 Balnamoon, 20 to 1 Newcastle, 25 £o 1 Glenbuck and Ticket-of Leave, 30 to 1 Electric, Marionette, and Phantom, 40 to 1 Gamester, 50 to 1 Defender and Glenluce colt, 100 to 1 Eeynard and Red Eagle. At 22 minutes to 4, the 7th attempt at starting was made, Nimrod soon taking the lead, Lord of the Manor second, Gallus third, and Gaspard fourth. After reaching the summit of the hill, Gallus made strong running until reaching Tattenham-corner, at which point Promised Land ran wide, and Defender took the lead, Trumpeter, Promised Land,' Phantom, and Marionette being well up. Below the distance Defender led by a length, but Trumpeter soon, passed him, and Promised Land'was running third,; At the half distance Musjid came from the ruck, had the lead opposite the stand, and won by half a length; a neck between second and third, and the same between third and fourth. Marionette was fifth, Defender and Phantom next. Nimrod and Balnamoon were almost distanced. It is generally believed that the judge was wrong in placing Ticket-of-leave second, and that he was not in the first ten. Marionette is considered to have been second, while some mention Gladiolus as being in the first three.. Great disappointment and confusion, however, arose out of the question. It seems, however, that an investigation of the* affair' will take place on Friday, before the stewards, immediately after the decision of the Oaks, when the horse which really ran second, will, we suspect, be found in the shape of Marionette. This year's victor, Musjid, is not in the Doncaster St. Ledger; but he is entered in the gold cup at Ascot, the Stewards' Cup ac Stockbridge, and two matches— one with Promised Land, and the other with North Lincoln. Sir Joseph Hawley and party are said to have won upwards of £80,000. _ FBIDAY. —THE OAKS. The Oaks Stakes of 50 soys. each, for three-year-old fillies; the second to receive 100 soys. out of the stakes. One mile and a half. 168 subs. Lord Londesborough's br. Summerside (G. Fordham) 1 Mr. T. Clark's eh. Scent, by Windhound (J.Mann) 2 Mr. J. Lowe's b. Wild Eose, by Surplice (L. Snowden) 3 Won very cleverly by half a length. —Fifteen ran. *#* The Derby.—Marionette has been awarded secoiyl place. .-,.. • ASCOT HEATH MEETING. —ASCOT CUP. Thursday, June 16. The Cup Day at Ascot was attended with a success which exceeded even expectation. The company was more numerous, the racing more interesting, and the crushing and crowding on the Grand Stand more uncomfortable than ever. The day was gloriously fine, and erratic husbands who had not taken their wives to Epsomfound no excuse in the weather not to fulfil their promise to accompany them to Ascot. Her Majesty the Queen and a large partywere present. The Gold Cup, by subscription of 20 soys. each, with 200 added. Three-year-olds, 6st. 101b.; four, Bst. 51b.: five, 9st.; six and a!>ed, 9st. 31b. Mares and geldings allowed 31b. 251 subs. About two miles and a half. Mr. F. Higgins's Fisherman ...Cresswell 1 Mr. Merry's Saunterer, 5 yrs Oslwne 2 , Sir J. Hawley's Beacon, 4 yrs Wells 3 The following also ran : —Nimrod, Bevis, North Lincoln, and Defender.—7 to 4. agst Fisherman, 8 to 1 Saunterer, and 6 to 1 Beacon.—The horses having proceeded to.the post before the Royal party had' reassembled in the saloon of the grand stand after luncheon, Mr. Hibburd therefore brought them back to promenade before the Queen's stand. After this (hey again went off to the post, and were soon on their journey, Nimrod taking the lead, followed by Saunterer and Bevis, North Lincoln and Defender being next, with Fisherman last. As they made for tlifi Swinley turn Nimrod was nearly twenty lengths ahead, but on rounding it Saunterer took his place. In. this order they disappeared round the hill; but on coming in sight Nimrod and Saunterer were close together, the rest a long way behind. At the Old Mile post Saunterer pulled_ to: the front, Fisherman began to improve his position at the Brick-kiln turn, and soon made a place alongside Saunterer: The race now was reduced to these two; but at the distance Fisherman quitted Saunterer, and won by a length and a half. The S others, headed by Defender, pulled up some distance from home, — European Times.-

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/LT18590827.2.8

Bibliographic details

SPORTING INTELLIGENCE., Lyttelton Times, Volume XII, Issue 710, 27 August 1859

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SPORTING INTELLIGENCE. Lyttelton Times, Volume XII, Issue 710, 27 August 1859

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