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OTAGO.

19thh,siT c thG Swa "' °tago PaPersto the D 2' MS n5 ion ? f a re Pre*e»tative for the Dunedin District, m the General Assembly took place on the 15th instaut. Messrs. John Parkm Taylor and Peter Murdoch Napier were proposed-and seconded. The political views o

, both appear to be identical, with the exception of the question of vote by ballot, of which .tire latter gentleman .expressed his intention of being a supporter, We give Mr. Taylor's views on this, and on the question of the Seat of Government, from the report of his address on the hustings. On the subject of the ballot, he believed that his opinions were opposed to those of the majority of the electors, and it was therefore the more necessary that he should state them distinctly. He always had objected to voting by ballot, and he believed he should never cease to do so.' He looked upon it as an unmanly, underhand, un-English mode of backing one's friends, lv the old country, in by-gone times, there might have been some excuse for the practice; on the plea of expediency; but here there could be none. No one could hope to exercise any influence here, except by argument or persuasion. Dependants, properly so called, did not exist in New Zealand. If hired servants are to be classed in that category, any attempt to coerce them would assuredly result in their dismissing their masters. In fact, the relative dependence of the various classes of society in a new colony was in a great measure reversed. The staple arguments against open voting were that it led to bribery and intimidation: but he would ask the electors if there was a man among them who would acknowledge, even to himself, either that he was open to a bribe, or feared the ill will of any man against whom he should choose to record his vote? He felt sure there were none such. And if not, then, should we not disgrace ourselves if, by adopting the ballot, we declared to the world that our integrity was not proof against bribery nor our courage against intimidation? There was but one other argument of any apparent weight which he had ever heard raised against open voting, viz., that it often loosened or destroyed the ties of friendship; upon which head he would only observe that the friendship of that man could be little worth preserving which could be shaken by an adverse vote. He could not speak as to the working of the ballot in Australia, but he considered it had failed in America. He should not object to an extension of the suffrage.

As to the seat of Government, he believed that the removal of the seat of Government to a more central position would be of the greatest advantage not only to this province, but to the colony generally. Would not pledge himself to vote for its removal to any place in particular, but should be satisfied to see it fixed anywhere in Cook's Straits, and the nearer the.southeastern entrance of it the better.

The show of hands was declared in favor of Mr. Taylor. Mr. Napier consequently demanded a polL It came off on the^Hftlj, and is reported as follows by the ' Colonist, of the 18th:—

The poll commenced at .12 o'clock. The first hour gaye Mr. Taylor a majority of 20, which was gradually increased until four o'clock, when the returning officer declared the numbers to be For Mr. Taylor 51 Mr. Napier 20 Majority ... ... —31 A vote of thanks to the returning officer closed the proceedings of the day. . ..> The returns from the various polling places in the country were received yesterday. The official declaration will, we believe, take place this day, .at 12 o'clock, but the following is the gross return:— v" Taylor. Napier. Dunedin ... ... ... 51 ... 20 i 1 ■ East Taieri 7 ... 13 ? Goodwood — ... 10 CLutha 8 ... 1 f. Tokomairiro „ 7 ... 2 Total 73 ... 46 Majority for Taylor... 27 On account of considerable dissatisfaction having seemingly arisen from the inefficient manner in which law has been dispensed in Dunedin, a public meeting, held on the 16th inst., adopted the following resolutions:—,

" That this meeting, viewing with alarm the way in which justice is at present administered in the Resident Magistrate's Court of Otago, hereby agree to request the Hon. J. H. Harrisone of the members of the Legislative Council— and James Macandrew, Esq.,—one of the members of the House of Representatives, to bring the matter under the notice of the General Executive Government, and ask a commission to be appointed to enquire into the whole Resident Magistrate's department of the province; and, if possible, to introduce.a measure into the General Assembly whereby all decisions for sums above £5 be made subject to review in a Court of Appeal."

"That in the sober, impartial,and dispassionate judgment of this meeting, the existing machinery of the local and inferior court of Judicature in Dunedin. is glaringly defective and unsatisfactory, that its decisions generally are based on the grossest injustice and disregard to the true interests of the community; that its mode of procedure is arbitrary, capricious, and absurd in the extreme; that even the bulwark of British liberty, to wit, Trial by Jury, under its agency, is the veriest mockery and imposition;— and that, therefore, it is the sacred and imperious duty of this meeting, as the representative of the public opinion on this matter, to take summary and constitutional measures to remedy this discreditable state of the public administration of justice in the province; that to give full effect to this resolution, a committee of the following gentlemen, viz., Messrs. Reynolds, Howorth, Seaton, Johnston, and Grant, be appointed and empowered to draw up a memorial to His Excellency the' Governor, embodying an impartial statement of the question at issue, and praying that His Excellency will be pleased to settle forthwith a branch of the Supreme Court of New Zealand in Dunedin; and that the committee be instructed forthwith to obtain as many signatures as possible to this memorial; and that thereafter they lose no time in forwarding the aforesaid memorial for His Excellency's favourable consideration."

11 l*° followin X from the ' Colonist,' June 18, is r , commercial^intelligence worth noticing:— The Strathfieldsaye cleared out for Melbourne yesterday. She takes from hence nearly twelve thousand bushels of oats, and upwards of sixty bales wool, the value of her cargo here beinj? estimated at £6000. We hope the Strathfield-

saye may reach Melbourne, in time to realise the latest quotations there, in which case her cargo will be worth £10,000. The price of grain, however; is so fluctuating, that there is no dependence on such a result.

Messrs. Young and Co. last week sold the cargo ex Harp by auction. The prices realised were remunerating.

Messrs. Macandrew and Co. sold the sawn timber ex Swan from Auckland at 28s. to 325., and flour at 225. They also sold sugar ex Henry at —Pampagna, 6£d., and Mauritius, B£d. Tea fetched £9 per chest.

The stock of tea and sugar in the hands of importers is completely exhausted, in fixct, there is none in the market.

Agricultural Produce. —The state of the roads in a great measure prevents the farmers from bringing their produce to market at present, although there is a large quantity both of wheat and oats to be disposed of; the former may be quoted at 6s. 6d. to 7s. for good samples, the latter 4s. 6d. to 55., dcliuered in Dunedin.

The true Lady.—A celebrated writer says: "No woman can be a lady who can wound or mortify another. No matter how beautiful, how refined, how cultivated she may be, she is in reality coarse, and the innate vulgarity of her nature manifests itself here. Uniformly kind, courteous, and polite treatment of all persons is one mark of a true woman."

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/LT18580630.2.9

Bibliographic details

OTAGO., Lyttelton Times, Volume IX, Issue 590, 30 June 1858

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1,313

OTAGO. Lyttelton Times, Volume IX, Issue 590, 30 June 1858

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