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English and Foreign.

INDIA. From the Sydney papers lately received by the Mary Thomson, we extract further particulars of the Indian news to latest dates. LATEST DAWK NEWS. (From the * Madras Athenaeum,' October 6.) The following relating- to the death and burial of the honourable Mr. Oolvin, was issued in garrison after orders at Agra, on the 9th instant. "Lieutenant Gotten, commanding at Agra, announces with much regret the I death of the honourable J. 8,. Colvin, Lieutenant-Governor of the NorthWestern Provinces, which event took place at half-past four p.m. this day. " His remains will be interred in the Armoury Square, to-morrow morning, the 10th instant, at half-past six a.m. All officers off duty are directed to attend. A funeral party, consisting of all men of the 3rd European Regiment off duty, will attend with the band of the regiment. Minute guns, seventeen in number, will be fired from the ramparts, under the direction of the officer commanding the Artillery, commencing from the time the funeral procession leaves the Palace Square." — Bombay Gazette, September 28. A private letter from Goa mentions that one of the Kolapore mutineers had been seized there, and delivered over by the local authorities to the Superintendent of Snwunt Waree. Five other men had also been forwarded to the collector of Belgaum, they having gone to Goa, armed with swords and fire-arms, and confessed to having been engaged in a revolt in the district of Dharwar, and being attacked and beaten by. European troops, some of whom they alleged that they had killed ! This vigilance and readiness of the Portugese Governor - General in a cause, which is so especially that of justice and humanity, is most "creditable to him, and will, doubtless, receive due recognition ; from the British Indian Government.— f Hid.

Letters from Jubbulpore to the 18th mtant, contain intelligence of consider-

able interest. About 9 p.m. of the 15fi> instant, trustworthy information was p P ceived that the sepoys were making prenar" ations to release from the gaol a number of people who had been imprisoned on »• charge of conspiracy, and to kill all th> Europeans. One hundred Madias'sepoys and some Madras cavalry were thereupon sent to the gaol, and in a few minutes the whole garrison were up, and at their posts The two guns, with nineteen European gunners, one hundred Madras sepoys and the remainder of the troop of Madras cavalry were ready to move wherever it might be considered necessary Pickets of cavalry and infantry were thrown out all round the Residency and two cavalry patrols made the circuit of the cantonments. Up to about one o'clock, however, nothing transpired, and those not on duty were tempted to lie down on their beds. But in less than half an hour afterwards the alarm was given that firing had been heard in the direction of the lines. The report was found to be well founded, and the whole garrison was again roused. Shortly after this, certain native officers and the Quarter-master Serjeant went up to the Residency, and confirmed the statement as to the intended rescue, adding, that the firing appeared to be carried on by some of the bad men with the intention of creating and commencing a disturbance. Roll call was. ordered, and it was found that eight sepoys of the 52nd Native Infantry were absent with their arms ; one was also reported absent from rear-guard duty.

About this time a cry of fire was raised, and it was found that a small bungalow close to the lines, was in flames, having most probably been fired by the deserters. The garrison stood to their arms till past morning gun fire, but there were no signs of an attack; on the contrary,'drill, guardmounting, target practice, &c, went on as usual, and so far as regards outward appearances, the regiment continued quiet and well behaved. . .

About three o'clock, the prisoners whose release had been contemplated, were brought up from the gaol to the Besidency and placed inside the battery. While the Madras sepoys were guarding the gaol several shots were fired at them, but no one was hit, nor could they ,catch a glimpse1 of their:assailants.

Still more exciting- events followed. For the last two or three months Shunker Shah, an old Rajah of the Gond dynasty, had been plotting* the destruction of the English at Jubbulpore and the burning of their houses, with the plunder of the treasury, and. the station generally. In this plot he was assisted by his son Rugonash Shah, and. by others, regarding whom no certain evidence had yet been obtained. Information of this plot having- , been given to Lieutenant Clerk, the Deputy Commissioner, he sent a chuprassie, in the disguise of a fakeer, to..find out the truth of the matter. The plan was perfectly successful. The conspirators disclosed sufficient of their evil designs to warrant their apprehension. Accordingly, a large body of Police was ordered to assemble at Lieutenant Clerk's bungalow, and was by that officer led to the Rajah's home j but when within a mile of the place, Lieutenant Clerk galloped forward with the sowars, and surrounded the vil- ; lage until the arrival of the foot police, when the apprehension was effected. In the possession of the Rajah was found a paper in Sanscrit, the purport of which was as follows: " Close up the mouths of the tale bearers. " Having- chewed the tale bearers, eat them. "Grind to pieces the enemies. "Having- killed the English, scatter them. "Oh Mat Chundee! (oMother Devee!) let none escape. "Kill the enemies and their families. " Protect Sunker (Mahadeo), and preserve your disciples. " Listen to the calling of the poor. "^ " Make haste, 0 mat Halika (Devee). " Eat the unclean race. : "Do not delay to devour them quickly. " 0 Gor Mat Kalika! (0 terrible Mother Devee!)" ■ Sufficient evidence was obtained to prove that extensive plots had been carried on, and after a trial of two days before a Joint Commission,consisting of Lieutenant Clerk, Deputy Commissioner of Jubbulpore j Lieutenant Wadding-ton, Deputy Commandant of the Mundle Districts; and Captain Moxon, of the 52nd N. 1., the Rajah and his son were convicted and sentenced to be blown from guns. This sen-

tence was duly executed in the Residency compound on the morning- of the 18th inst. The other1 conspirators who were convicted w ere reserved for punishment on the following1 day, but it was thought that an example having- been made, none of them would be blown from guns. The affair was likely to excite some commotion in the neighbourhood, but the country-people were not so much a cause of apprehension as the sepoys and the rascals in the Thugee Department who, it was thought, might be frightened into action. Fortunately there was part of the Madras column at Jubbulpore with the aid of which the residents could hold their own against ten times their number for a long time.— lbid. The following is from our own correspondent with General Havelock's force:— Cawnpore, 12th Sept., 1857.—1n the course of the past we have had augmentations to our army' from the lower provinces, and more are daily expected. General Sir J. Outrarn, with seven hundred bayonets, and one horse field battery, is to come in to-morrow from Allahabad, and it is said that we await the arrival of some eight hundred more, ere a move to Lucknow will or can be effected. Morning and evening parades and roll-calls are quite the order of the day, together .with the training of the volunteer cavalry ■in the use of the sword &c, as also our new Horse Battery, which has made wonderful progress. This morning the battery was out manoeuvring, firing- blank to see the effect of the shock upon the new horses. lam told they stood the fire well, and with a few more exercises, will be deemed efficient for the field. The enemy . are working like bricks on the other &ide of the river,erecting breastworks, batteries, and mining the roads. A few days since, they had an experimental explosion of one of these mines, but the simpletons had the train set on the wrong way, and when a great mob had congregated to witness the burrah tamasha —tamasha in truth!—for it sent some 3 or 4000 kicking in the air. Yesterday we sent a reconnoitering party of one hundred men on board the H» C. steamer Berhampootra; but the vessel, on crossing the Ganges, got foul of a sand bank and stuck fast. No sooner did the rebels notice this mishap, than they thought it a good chance to sink the vessel, which tbey considered a great bore, and blazed away their guns at-her. On hearing and seeing this, we replied to them by our 24-pounders from our entrenched camp, and several of the insurgents were floored, together with one elephant, the whole of its posteriors being carried clean off with a round shot. This proved sufficient for the enemy, and they were seen scampering off in. search of,the road home. Last evening they again assembled close to the,river in thousands, and fired off a few of their 9 pounders. We again returned the complirnent-Vy our monsters* and a few shots sufficed to scatter them. Boats were sent for the unsuccessful reconnoitering party, and the steamer soon afterwards floated, and is now safe at the bank side, having received no damage. The bank on this side of the river is- much higher than that on the other, and we therefore command a better view and : range than they do ; their shot drop far short of the land on this side, —ours, though of the same calibre, carry, well across. It is contemplated to leave the whole of the sick, with 4000 effective men, in the entrenchment, the main body of the army going on to the relief of the garrison afc Lucknow. After this is effected, our gallant boys return here, and should we be required, move on to Delhi; but this can scarcely be, as Delhi will soon be in our hands, The fort has been for some days surrounded by our troops, and several sorties were made by the besieged, but were repulsed with immense loss, our killed and wounded amounting to about forty of all ranks. It is, I believe, the wish of Government to save, if possible, the fort and town of Delhi from destruction. -Were it otherwise the whole would long since have been levelled. The men of our small army are in most excellent health and spirits, and wish impatiently to have Lucknow in possession. Only two casualties occurred during the week, and the prevailing disease now is fever of the common type. Cholera has totally disappeared; and it was, indeed, the bane of our little army. Our heroic general is in excellent health and spirits, and goes his rounds morning and evening. Mighty preparations are beino-made for the crossing of the army. We have about 1500 bayonets, and twenty guns go on to Lucknow. We will get across in less time than we did before, as lots of boats are moored along the banks of the Ganges. I trust we will come off as scot free this time as we did the last. Is it not strange that this force, since its formation in Allahabab, has never had either a protestant minister or Roman Catholic chaplain? The weather during the past week or ten days has been cool and pleasant, especi~au> in the mornings and evenings. We have hail an occasional.shower of rain.— JJombay Times, September 28. A letter from Delhi dated the 20th August mentions that Mrs. Leeson when she made her escape from Delhi was disguised a? an Affghan, her hands and face being-browned so as to resemble a native. As she had been compelled to remain in complete seclusion while in the city she necessarily had very little to say with refard to what was going on there, but she rmly balieves that there are several Europeans both men and women kept in concealment. . The same letter also alludes to an affair

which reflects the greatest credit on a native pnnce. It appears that Lieutenant Hoc son was about thirty miles from Delhi on the road to Rontuck," that he had r iven tne rebels a sound drubbing but was heiner gradually overwhelmed by their We numbers Under these circumstances he expressed to the Delhi camp for reinforcements but although they were despatched immediately, he was relieved by the Jheend Rajah, before they had gone half way. °

A letter from General Van Cortlanclt's camp dated the 22nd August states that the action of the 19th at Hissar had afforded "a little employment to l Jack Ketch,' several men having heen hanged and some sowars and sepoys shot." A short account of this action appears elsewhere, from which it will be seen that the rebels were led by one of our horse patrols.

It is stated in a letter from Gwalior, dated the Bth August, that from nine to ten thousand mutineers from Indore had arrived there, and that the Rajah had had great trouble to keep them in' order. He had, however, managed to do so by promising to supply them with conveyance, and they were expected to leave for Delhi or Agra or Cawnpore.

_ The ' Bombay Gazette' calls attention to a divisional order 'issued afc Meerut requesting all commanding officers or senior surviving officers to make out a list of the men belonging to their late regiments who have made themsdves conspicuous as ring-leaders in the rebellion; the list is to be forwarded to army headquarters.

The 'Englishman,' quoting a letter from Singbhoom, states that the Kajah has kept all quiet in that neighbourhood, that workmen had returned to their labour, and that the natives were evidently beginning to think " that the British rule would still remain supreme in India as heretofore."

The same journal informs us that the rebellion has extended to Upper Assam, where the sepoys have burnt several tea plantations ; five of the planters have left their plantations and were in'Gowhatty on the Ist September.— -Ibid. The 'Punjabee/ of the 27th ultimo, states that Mrs. Gleeson, the wife of Mr. Gleoson, deputy collector, made her escape on the morning of the 19 th from Delhi, where she was kept in a sort of a dungeon, and was almost reduced to a skeleton. Two chupprases, who, it appears, have all along been faithful to her, aided her in making her attempt to escape. They passed through the Ajmere gate, but not wholly unobserved by the mutineers' sentries, as one of. the chupprases was shot by them. It being dark at the time, she lay hidden among the long web grass until the dawn of the day, when she sent the chupprase to reconnoitre, and as luck would have it, he came across the European picquet stationed, at Subzie Mv- idie. So soon as he could discover who they v^ere, he went and brought the lady into the pice uethouse amongst the soldiers, who did all bhey could to procure her safety. When she arrived inside the square, she fell down'upon her knees, and offered up a prayer to heaven for her safe deliverance. All she had round her body \* as a dirty piece of cloth, and another piece folded round her head. She was in a terrible condition, and some shed tears of pity when they heard the tale of woe that she related. After being interrogated by the officers for a short time, Captain Bailey provided a doolee for her, and sent her under escort safe to camp, where all her wants have been attended to.— Madras Spectator.

We give the following additional particulars from our files of Indian papers: —■

Bombay, Satnrday, Oct. 3, 6 a.m.

Report came in from Jemapore by express to Government. Our troops occupied the entire city of Delhi on the 20th. No details; report at Ahmedabad, on letters from Ajmeer, that the King had been captured. Official bulletin. — Lahore, September 17th. —Magazine stormed on 16th, and five mortars opened thence on the palace. Private intelligence of final fall had reached the Commissioner of Scinde. Officers killed : Lang, Engineers; Mac Barnet,_ 55th; Murray, Jacob, Ist Fusiliers; Ross, Carbineers; Homfrey, 4th Punjaub Infantry. About 40 wounded. This up to afternoon of 16th._ Our total loss killed and wounded to morning of the 15th estimated at 500. Steamer England waiting at Kurrachee to bring further news. A few men of the native infantry at Shikapore mutinied on the 23rd; emeute suppressed. Report of the Neemuch force having defeated rebels and taken guns.-— Ceylon Times, Oct. 11.

Colonel Beecher describes operations at Delhi thus: —

The troops entered at the breach, near the Cashmere Gate, without serious opposition, and gained possession of the large building in its neighbourhood, and advanced along the ramparts to +.he Moree Bastion and Cabal Gate, in progress to which the resistance was very obstinate, and the loss consequently has been severe, but we are advancing gradually within the city. Large bodies of the army have been seen retreating both in the direction of the Kotub and over the bridge. Arrangements are making for batteries to be made in the city, and thenhe ivy guns have been turned against tbem. M-iny officers wounded, including General Nicholson, Col. Campbell, 52nd; Major Baid, Sirmoor Battalion ; Lieut. Bradshaw, 32nd; and Fitzgerald, 75th, killed.

Bombay, Tuesday, Sept. 23. _ News from Delhi to the 6th of Sept. The siege train arrived on the 4th, and was being got into position. The town is to be shelled, bo it is said. It is reported that mutineers of regiments who had murdered their officers had separated from the others and left the place, in number about 5000. A flag of truce was sent out, proposing to hang up the actual murderers. All overtures, however, were strongly repelled. A companj' of Bombay Artillery has been disarmed at Hyderabad, Scinde. The report of a revolution at Gwalior has been contradicted.

The following intelligence, received from the Commissioner at TJmballah, and dated September 5, was communicated to the press yesterday evening-:—

All quiet in the Cis Sutlej and in the Punjaub. The siege train with its escort arrived in camp yesterday, and active offensive operations will now commence. The Cashmere Contingent is at Kurnaul. The soldiery inside the city are clamouring for pay and the plunder of the city hourly threatened. The manufacture of powder by the rebels is suspended for want of sulphur. Messengers from Lucknow and Bareilly have lately arrived at Delhi to confer with the King, and the state of affairs there has greatly surprised and mortified him.

The 'Phoenix,' of September 10 ; has the following- from Cawnpore:—

A letter from Cawnpore, dated Sept. 3, states that the troops there are in the very highest spirits, and anxiously looking out for reinforcements to enable them to advance to the relief of Lucknow. Officers, men, and all, were huddled together in the bullock-sheds, and though there was no grumbling, affairs wore a very democratic, aspect. The enemy, apparently in strength, could be seen on the opposite bank of the Ganges. They were fortifying their camp, and making their position such, that in all probability the re-passage of the river would have to be attempted elsewhere. They were working most actively, and could be noticed at work at late hours in the night. All Oude is up in arms, and according to native opinion resolved to fight to the last. Every village is a fortress, and every villager a brigand and of the worst description.

The Nawab of Futtehghur has blown from gun 3 one gentleman and three ladies, whose names were Mr. and Mrs. Birch, Mrs. Eckford, and Mrs. Defontaine; also, that at Moradabad, four persons, Messrs. Powell, Hill, Macguire, and Dorrington, with their wives and families, amounting in all to 36 persons, in order to save their lives, became converts to Mahomedanism.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

English and Foreign., Lyttelton Times, Volume VIII, Issue 533, 12 December 1857

Word Count
3,321

English and Foreign. Lyttelton Times, Volume VIII, Issue 533, 12 December 1857

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