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The Lyttelton Times. Saturday, December 22.

J/TTTEr/rON ELECTIOX. Yeste"roa.y, £t noon, a meeting1 of the electors was held in front of the Police office, Lyttelton, to elect a member for Lyttelton in the Uouse of Representatives. The writ having been read by the Returningofficer, Mr. I. T. Cooksox came forward and proposed J. K. Frxz Geeaxd, Esq., as a fit and proper person to represent the constituency. Mr. Rowland Davis seconded the nomination. No other candidate being proposed, Mr. Frrz Gbbaxd was declared duly elected. [We are compelled to postpone Mr Fitz Gerald's address till Wednesday.3 cHiusTCKoneir countey disteict ELECTION. The, Polling of the Chrtstchurch Country District came off on Thursday last. At

Christchurch where was the principal polling place the excitement was very great. Indeed at no previous election have the inhabitants of Christchurch been astonished by so much bustle and noise. Vehicles of all kinds rattling about with colours flying, eager electors canvassing timid or doubtful voters up to the very door of the 1 polling office, —the shouting and the drinking, all reminded a bye-stander a little too much of similar scenes in the old Country. We are happy to say, however, that the exhiliration of the electors expended itself for the most part in a very good-humoured way. All through the da}' at Christchurch, Mr. Hall and Mr. Ollivier, were at the head of the poll with varying fortunes, but the first news from Lyttelton showed a return in favour of Mr. Brittin over Mr. Ollivier in that town which clearly indicated how the contest would end. At 6 o'clock p.m., the Returning officer declared the state of the poll in the three' polling divisions of the district. It was as follows, — Christchnrch. Lytteltoa. Kaiapoi. Total. Hall .... 167 33 .... 41 241 BriUin.... 139 61 .... 8 203 Ollivier .. 153 7 .... 17 177 Ward.... 56 .... 28 .... 33 117 He then proceeded to declare Messrs. Hall and Brittin duly elecced to represent the Christchurch Country District in the House of Representatives. Mr. Hall then addressed the Electors, thanking them for having placed him at the head of the poll, and saying that all angry feelings which might have been engendered during the contest would not be remembered by him from that time. Mr. Thomson then came forward on the part of Mr. Brittin; and said that.Mr. Brittin had gone into Port, not having been aware that the result of the election would be declared that evening. He begged to thank the electors on the part of Mr. Brittin, in whose election he said they had achieved a triumph. Mr. Ward came forward as an unsuccessful candidate, and in a neat little speech thanked those of the electors who had supported him, and said that he hoped to be more successful next time. He was very well received by the electors, and we must say for this gentleman that the manner in which he has conducted himself throughout this election is highly creditable to him as an independent candidate, and we have no doubt but that the electors of the district have fully appreciated his conduct. Mr. OiiLiviEK then addressed the electors. He said that he had been most unexpectedly to himself unsuccessful ; that he attributed his want of success to his standing by Mr. Brittin, and to the opposition of a clique—whose conduct he pronounced disgraceful throughout the election. After three cheers for the successful candidates, for the unsuccessful candidates, and for the Returning Officer, the proceedings terminated. Advantages of Steam Communication. —We understand that two dray loads of wool left-Mr. Waitt's station, Teviotdale, outside the Canterbury block on Thursday week, and arrived in,Kaiapoi on the Friday, was shipped on board the steamer " Alma " the same day, and arrived in Port Lyttellon the same evening. Yesterday, the " Alma" brought another cargo of wool into Port, ten bales of which were from Messrs. Russell and Creyke's station, shipped at the Ferry direct from the drays. We have been informed that the wool packed in these ten bales was on the sheep's back on Wednesday last. In addition to the advantages conferred on the industries of the Province by the introduction of steam navigation, the "Alma"' has been ministering to the pleasures of our population. On Monday last, the anniversary of the foundation of the settle-

meat, a pleasure trip .'to Pigeon Bay was organised by Mr. Genet, of Lyttelton, to start from the Christchurch Ferry, calling at Lyttelton for passengers. Between 70 and 80 took advantage of the occasion to visit this ba}% one of the most beautiful spots in the Province. The trip, we understand, was a very delightful one, and we trust excursion trips to our different townships and bays will not be uufreque'nt. 1-loimcui.TUßAL Exhibition. —The fourth Summer exhibition of the Christchurch Horticultural Society was held in the building adjoining the cricket ground on Monday last. The exhibition was perhaps the largest and the best the Society has hitherto held. There was no want of competition for most of the prizes offered' by the Society, although the previous show at Lyttelton possibly prevented several who had hitherto competed from forwarding productions. We append the list of the prizes awarded by the Judges.— Fruits and Vegetables. Strawberries—lst prize, Mr. J. C. Watti Russell; 2nd, Mrs. C. Thompson ; 3rd, Archdeacon Mathias; extra, Mr. W. G. Brittau. Raspberries—No competition. Gooseberries—lst prize, Mr. W. G. Britlan ; 2nd, Mr. Dudley • 3rd, Mr. J. T. Brown. Currants (collection) —Ist prize. Mr. W Wilson. Cherries—2nd prize, Mr. W. Wilson. . Rhubarb— Ist prize, Mr. Harrison ; 2nd, Mr. Sutliffe; 3rd, Archdeacon Mathim."s? Peas in pod—lst prize, Mr. Harrison, 2nd and 3rd, Mr. Stephens. Beans (broad) —Ist Mr. Thomason ; 2nd, Mr. Stephens. Asparagus—lst prize, Aichdeacon Mathias. . Potatoes (new) —Ist prize, Mr. J. T. Brown ; 2nd, Mr. W. G. BriUan ; 3rd, Mr. Hall. Potatoes (old)—lst prize, Mr. W. Wilson; 2nd, Mr. Stephens; 3rd, Mr. Thomason. "Carrots—lst and 2nd prize, Mr. Stephens; 3rd, Archdeacon Mathias. Turnips—lst prize, Archdeacon Mathias ; 2ud, Mr. Stephens; 3rd, Mr. W. Wilson. Cabbages—lst prize, Mr. Stephens; 2nd, Mr. McCormack; 3rd, Mr. W. G. Brittan. Cauliflowers—lst prize, Mr, Packer; 2nd, Mr. J. C. Watts R.issell ; 3rd, Archdeacon Mat Lias. Brocoli—lst prize, Mr. W. Wilson. Onions (green)—lst prize,, Mr: McCorsnack ; 2nd, Mr. Dudley ; 3rd, Mr. Thomason, Onions (old)—extra prize, Mr. W. Wilson. Lettuces, —Ist prize, Dr.. Dorsett ; 2nd do., Mr Thomstson ; 3rd do., Mr. J. Brittan. . Basket of salad, —extra prize W. Wilson. Pot Herbs,—Mr. W. Wilsou; 2nd do., Mr. J. T. Brown. Native grasses—Extra prize, Mr. W. WiLon. Flowers. . Best collection of roses—lst prize, Mr. Cass ; 2nd do., Mrs. Deans. Geraniums, — Ist prize, Mr. 1. 0. Watts Russell; 2nd do., Mr. W. G. Brittan ; 3rd do., Mr. W. G. Brittan ; 4th do., Mr. Packer; sth do., Mr. W. G. Britlan. Piccotees,—lst prize, Mr. W. Wilson : 2nd do., J. C. Watts Russell; 3rd do., Mr. Packer. Pinks,—lst. prize, Mr. Crosier ; 2nd do., Mr. W. Wilson. Pansies— Ist prize, Mr. W. Wilson ; 2nd do. Mr. J. C. Walts Russell. Stocks [collection of), —Mr. Stephens; 2nd d«>., Mr. W.Wikon Sweet Williams, — Ist prize, Mrs. Deans; 2nd do., Mr. W. Wilson ; 3rd do., Mr. Stephens. Verbenas—lst prize, Mr. Cuss; 2nd do , Mr. J. C. Watts Russell. Flowering-Bulbs—lst prize, Mr. W. Wilson ; 2nd do, Mr. Stephens Collection of Cut Flower?, — Ist prize, Mr W. G. Britian; 2nd do., Mrs. Dean ■; 3rd do.' Miss Reese; 4th do., Archdeacon Mathias 5 sth do., Mr. Stephens. CnnrsTCHTjjicii Cricket Cxtjb. —-A match was played on the anniversary between the Christchurch and Rangiora Clubs on the ground of the former. As there were a great many members of the club on the ground, it was determined, in order to include tfcose who were in the habit of playing, that the game should be played with 13 on a side. The Rangiora Club having only

their own eleven on the ground, Messrs. Bowen and Wilson of the Christchurch Club played on the Rangiora side. We subjoin the scores of the first innings, by which the match was decided, as there was not time to play a second innings. A return match will be played at Rangiora in a month or two. Chrislchurch Club, — First Innings. -Runs. Blukision, 0 ,1. b. w.,b. by Ward 5 Miles, G., c. by Gieeii, b. by Wjtvd 2 Boweri, Cr., c. by Hilton, b. by Ward......... 0 Field, b. out by Ward 2 Brittan, J., c. by Torlesse, b. by Ward 11 Worsley, c. by Ward, b. by Ward............ 12 Brittan, W. G.. b. out by Ward.. 2 Da,we,,c..by Raven, b. by Ward 1 Fendall, not 0ut................... 19 Longden, J., b. out by Ward 2 Croft,-A.C, hit wicket, b. by Boys.. 2 Knight, A., c. by Toilesse. b. by Boys 8 Wrigbt, R., c., do, b. do 2 Byes, 8, widet, 10......... 19 Total 86 Rangiora Club. — First Innings. • ■ Hnns. Bowen, C. C, c. by Brittan, b. by Wright .., 24 Wilson, b. by Croft 0 Sadler, b. by .Wright.;.... 3 Green, c.; by Blakiston, b, by Wright......... 0 Hilton, b. by Wright...... 4 Ward, c. by Blakiston, b. by d 0..... 0 Boys. J.C., c. by Wright, b. by Croft 2 Raven, b.by Wright..... 0 Torlesse, b. by do ,„... o Ward, C, b. by do 2 Boys, T., not'out.. 0 Blakiston, A,b. by Wright.; 0 Torlesse, b. by do 8 Byes 6, wides, 2. 8 Total 43

We I have been requested to caution anxious mothers against "the tutu berries now ripe ; several cases of poisoning have already occurred amongst children.

To the Editor of the Li/ttelton Times. Sjr,—Some three years ago considerable stir was made about building a church and school house at Governor's Bay. A worthy resident proprietor of the Bay was laudably active in raising funds for the buildings. At Lyttelton, as well as Christchurch, the officiating ministers called for a special offertory Pray can you inform me who now holds the money which I and others gave on the occasion : whether the church and school house are erected, or at all likely to be, and if not, by what process in law or in equity I can recover my money, or have it placed under a legally responsible trust ? I ana, sir, yours truly, Pheelkweer.

To the Editor of the LyHelton Times. Sir,—Will you allow me to call attention through your columns to a question interesting directly-no small, part of the public, and indirectly fh°. public at large ; I allude to a glaring deficiency (so at least it seems to me) in the present Scab Act. If that act contains a clause rendering- it penal for a man to have scabby sheep in his possession, a clause enforced by the periodical visits of a Government Inspector; surely it ought also to guarantee to him the possibility of getting rid of those scabby sheep, although at a great sacrifice. In Australia, where the provisions of the present Scab Act are ot extreme stringency, government does this. If the owner of- scabby sheep will kill and burn them all, Government will pay him 45,, per head for them. Is the Government here prepared to adopt ft similar measure ? It not, let us examine the dilemma to which it may shortly be reduced. Let us suppose that some unfortunate sheep owner, Mr. A, after exerting himself to the utmost, and spending all his available

cash in the endeavour to clean his flock,, finds, that although he has greatly reduced the scab, he his not entirely eradicated it; no unreasonable supposition, as I am certain that all who have had experience of the management of scabby sheep, will agree that in this country it is Impossible with certainty to clean a large flock, in four, six, or even twelve months, especially if the country be hilly and broken, and the whole neighbourhood depastured by scabby flocks. Well, the Government Inspector on his "next round reports Mr. A. who is fined according to the statute in that case made and provided. But by our'• first supposition Mr. A cannot pay the fine. What will Government do ? Will it seize the unfortunate A's horses'or bullocks, and by making it impossible for him to work his station efficiently, make it less likely than ever that he should succeed in cleaning his sheep ? (to say nothing of the obvious impolicy of " killing the goose that lays the golden eggs "). Or will it seize his sheep, and so place itself in the unenviable predicament of owning scabby- sheep, with the chance of shortly realising feelingly the practical working of its own act ? It may be thought that I owe y^ur readers ah apology for resuscitating so unsavoury a subject, discussed before now at so weary a length; perhaps Ido ; still, as, from the rapid spread of scab in the Province, this somewhat knotty problem ma)'.shortly present itself for solution, it is perhaps as well that these questions should be publicly asked, before the sheep-owners and the Government find themselves at so disagreeable a pinch. I remain, Sir, Your obedient servant, A Squatter.

The following letter, accompanying the petitions to the Queen and the Archbishop of Canterbury, respecting the Bishopric of Christchurch, was unavoidably omitted on Wednesda)': — To the Editor of the Lytleltm Times. Sir, —I have much pleasure in forwarding to you tha accompanying documents for publication. 1. A petition to her Majesty the Queen ; 2. a memorial to his Grace the Archbishop of Canterbury, respecting the Bishopric of Christchurch. They will be ready for public signature as soon as the legal transfer of the lands intended to be conveyed for the endowment of the bishopric shall be complete. I am, sir, your obedient servant, Henry Jacobs, Secretary to the Church Property Trustees. Christchnrch, D2C. 15, 1855. " To his Grace tJie Archbishop of Canterbury, Primate of all England and Metropolitan. May it Please Your Gra.ce,— We, the undersigned Church Property Trustees of the Province of Canterbury, New Zealand, and other members of the United Church of England and Ireland, resident in the said Province, respectfully beg the assistance'of your Grace's influence to obtain for us the speedy appointment and consecration of a Bishop of Christchurch. Your Grace is aware that one of the first objects of the Canterbury Association was the establishment of a Bishopric in the Settlement they were about to found, and that the full consent of her Majesty's Government wis obtained to the establishment of such Bishopric, on condition that an income of not less than £500 per annum should be provided for the future maintenance and support of the Bishop. The public announcement of this intention on the part of the Association, with the consent of her Majesty's Government thereto, and the actual appointment of a Bishop

Designate, were among the strongest inducements to most of us to become • purchasers of land and settlers in Canterbury. Your^ Grace, however, will recollect that technical difficulties connected with the separation of the previously existing Diocese of New Zealand intervened, and disappointed the hopes and wishes of the Association and the colonists, as far as the immediate consecration of a Bishop was concerned. All difficulties of this kind were, however, ■ removed by the Act of Parliament, passed in the 15th and 16th years of her Majesty's, reign, cap. 88, entituled "An Act to remove doubts as to the constitution of the Diocese of Christchurch, in New Zealand, and to enable her Majesty to constitute such Bishopric, and to subdivde the Diocese of New Zealand." But, since the passing of this act, further delay has been caused by the negotiations necessary for * the winding-up of the Association's affairs, and the transfer of the property held in trust by them for ecclesiastical and educational purposes to some: competent body of trustees within the Settlement. These negotiations, however, have finally resulted in the establishment by Provincial Ordinance, of a corporate body called the Church Property Trustees, consisting of the Bishop of the Diocese for the time being, the licensed clergy of the Settlement and representatives of the laity, annually elected for each parish, and in the transfer to the body thus constituted (besides other property for general ecclesiastical purposes) of certain landed estates for the endowment of the Bishopric. These lands being part of those known as the Lyttelton Trust Estates, are estimated by competent judges to be worth upwards of £14,000 at the present time, and are at present producing an actual net income of more than £600 per annum. They are transfex-red to the Church Property Trustees subject to a first charge of at least £600 per annum, to be paid to the Bishop of Christchurch for the time being, for his support and maintenance. Under these circumstances, and after a lapse of five years from the foundation of the Settlement, we earnestly trust that no further delay will be allowed to intervene, and we verture to rely upon your Grace's zeal, for the welfare and good Government of the Church, and warm interest in the well being of this Settlement in particular, of which your Grace was one of the chief founders and well-wishers, that your utmost endeavours will be exerted on our behalf to obtain for us as soon as possible the accomplishment of our wishes. Your memorialists r.re desirous to impress upon your Grace their great anxiety for the attainment of this object. They beg to represent that the patience of jnany, who have waited so long and have so often been disappointed, is we'll nigh exhausted, and that any farther delay is likely to he of incalculable injury to the interests of the Church in a country, where the difficulty of communication renders the efficient Episcopal Superintendence of the present undivided Diocese an absolute impossibility. To no one, we are well assured, is this disheartening fact more painfully obvious than to'our present venerated Bishop, who as is well known, is mcst anxious to be relieved from a portion of the heavy responsibility now pressing upon him, and who has been prevented hitherto by the constant expectation of the division of the diocese, and the consequent desire to anticipate.as little as possible the arrangements of the bishop to be appointed, from entering as fully into the administration of the affairs of the Church in this portion of his diocese as he would otherwise have done. We beg to inform your Grace that we have addressed a Petition to Her Majesty, praying Her Majesty to issue her Royal Mandate for the appoiu

ittent and consecration of a bishop of Ghristchurch on the same grounds as those stated in this memorial to your Grace, and we humbly beg your Grace's support to the prayer of that* Petition. Believing also that our*earnest and united wishes will not be disregarded as to the person to be selected to fill this office, we have ventured to solicit Her Majesty to appoint the Rev. Henry John Chiitey Has per, M. A., Vicar of Stratfield Mortimer, in the County of Berks and diocese of Oxford, and formerly Conduct of Eton College, to be the first Bishop of Christchurch. May we venture to hope that your Grace will give the weight of your support to this prayer of our Petition also! We make these representations to your Grace in full reliance on your Grace's sympathy and willingness to help us, in which assurance, and with hearty prayers for the blessing of God on all our labours for the welfare of His Holy Church* we beg to subscribe ourselves, your Grace's humble and obedient servants, ~ [The petition to Her Majesty the Queen, referred to in Mr. Jacob's letter, was given in Wednesday's paper?]

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Bibliographic details

The Lyttelton Times. Saturday, December 22., Lyttelton Times, Volume V, Issue 328, 22 December 1855

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The Lyttelton Times. Saturday, December 22. Lyttelton Times, Volume V, Issue 328, 22 December 1855

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