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We are obliged to call the attention of the authorities to the fact that vessels are permitted to clear out for a port to which they have not any intention of proceeding, while it is well known to many that their whole cargo and passengers are intended for another. Loud kashas been the outcry and great the talk in public meetings and private life about the necessity of an established line of steam on our coasts, by the tacit consent of the authorities the few and far between visits of traders are rendered useless to a whole community—to serve the interests of one—while many amongst us are actually sufferers from the loss of the " Mahomed Shah," and more than commonly anxious for advices. We are gratuitously insultediandievery feeling outraged by secondary information that three European and many Colonial mails are reposing in the Post Office at Wellington, because the "' Necromancer" chose to clear, out for Otago. Against such proceedings we may shortly have power to protect ourselves, and those amongst Us who shall be called to sit in our representative chambers will doubtless consider this (in common with some other abuses) worthy of being looked into and rectified. Our last advices from Wellington and other parts were received on the 26th ultimo, and at a time when the necessity of earnest co-operation and advice are most called for we are' still left to hope and wait, it may be for another month, before we receive intelligence of any sort. In concluding.these strictures, we would recommend a memorial to be drawn up, and signed by all, addressed to the Collector of Customs at Wellington. The only news we gather is that Dr. Feather--stone has been elected Superintendent, and that the Governor is going home, having received a year's leave of absence. What truth- there, is in this report, we have no means of knowing.

ELECTION OF SUPERINTENDENT. The nomination of Candidates for the office of Superintendent took place on Monday, at Christchurch, very capacious hustings having been erected fronting the Land -Office. ..The morning was most unpropitious and gloomy, notwithstanding which a large body of Electors were present who took a warm interest in the proceedings. Everything was admirably arranged and carried out, and undisturbed by any approach to bad feeling, though party spirit was running high. Captain Simeon, the Returning Officer,"mounted the hustings at 1 p'clock accompanied by Colonel Campbell arid MrJ Fitz Gerald, and the supporters of these gentlemen and of Mr. Tancred. Prior to opening the proceedings, Mr.. Dampier, the. professional Agent of Colonel Campbell, handed to the Returning Officer-a paper, which we .understood to be a notice signed by Colonel Camp- • bell of his being 'duly qualified, and of his claim to his franchise having been entered upon I the Register and wrongfully erased. I The Returning Officer having been duly sworn, read the writ, and addressed the electorsHaving briefly adverted to the importance of the occasion- he demanded an impartial hearing for all parties, and hoped that the contest, would be carried on in a spirit free from that ani- . mosity which so generally prevailed at elections in England (cheers). ■ , . Mr. I. T. Cookson then proposed James Edward Fitz Gerald, Esq., as a fit and proper person to be Superintendent. He briefly adverted to Mr. Fitz.Gerald's claims totheir support as an active, promoter of the Province, and one whose interests were closely bound up with its prosperity. , , Mr. J r Deans (of Rieparton) seconded the nomination. .

Mr. John Bealy proposed Henry John Tancred, Esq., aud read a long speech strongly advocating the claims of that gentleman. He created some amusement by stating that Col. Campbell had been brought forward by Mr. Fitz Gerald's supporters in order to abstract votes from Mr. Tancred, but he trusted so palpable an electioneering dodge would be seen through by the intelligent electors he was addressing. We have neither space nor time to give other than a brief digest of the speeches. Like the rest of the community we have been electioneering, and with the best intentions possible find it utterly impossible to redeem two days so judiciously spent. This refers to the whole of our establishment who were partakers of the prevailing anxious feeling. Mr. Packer Mr. Tancred, and delivered a very telling speech in his favour. There was a considerable amount of legitimate chaff carried on during Mr. Packer's address, and we are bound to admit that he was a first-rate hand at it; those who risked the trial receiving a great deal more than they gave. Mr. Moorhouse proposed Colonel Campbell and warmly advocated his interests, and dwelt at considerable length on the past services of , the gallant Veteran. He pledged his reputation as a lawyer that were Col. Campbell placed at the head of the Poll, he would be kept there , in spite of his name not appearing on the electoral roll.

The Rev. Joseph Twigger seconded the nomination. At this stage of the proceedings, Mr. Bray handed a protest to the Returning Officer against allowing Colonel Campbell to be put in nomination. Captain Simeon said he had given the subject the most anxious and serious attention, and yvas prepared to allow Colonel Campbell to be nominated. (Loud cheers.) He said he might have acted otheiv wise, but he wished everything to be carried on in a spirit of impartiality and fair play. (Much cheering.) At the same time he felt bound to add that though he would allow votes to be.

.registered for Colonel Campbell, yet in the event of his being at the head of the poll, he could not return him as Superintendent, but elect the second Candidate. He therefore impressed upon the electors that as far as. the proceedings went in the Province, that all votes for Colonel' Campbell would he thrown away. Mr. Dampier inquired, " If he had the original roll from Akaroa before him ?" Captain Simeon—"No, I have a copy." Mr. D.—"ls Colonel Campbell's name, upon it?'; /.'.lt is not." Mr. D.—'• Have you the original Register or list of claims from Akaroa ?" "■ No." Mr. D.—" Colonel Campbell's name and quali-; fication are upon that list, and havebeen wrongfully erased ; the Colonel will seek his remedy."

Mr. Fitz Gerald then delivered a' long speech. He dwelt at length upon the. office and duties of Superintendent, and upon the questions of land and labour. We hope to be able to give in extenso next week a report of the speech.

Sir Thomas Tancred came forward and begged to say-a few words on behalf of his brother who was unavoidably absent. Sir Thomas's remarks had the infelicitous effect of damaging the cause he wished to serve.

Colonel Campbell spoke at some length, and impressed upon the Electors that he was eligible, and that his name had been improperly erased. In the event of his heading the poll he would be-their-Superintendent, and called upon those present not to be deterred from voting for him.

Several electors afterwards addressed the Assembly, when the Returning Officer called for a show of hands, which he declared to be in favour of Mr. Fitz Gerald, an announcement which was received with loud cheers by that gentleman's friends and supporters. A poll was demanded on behalf of Col. Campbell, and the proceedings terminated with a vote of thanks to the Returning Officer for his fair and impartial conduct, which was cordially responded to. A very large meeting of'electors took place at the White Hart on Tuesday evening, when Mr. Tancred and Mr. Fitz Gerald addressed them. •

The Polling commenced at 10 o'clock' on Wednesday, and up to 11 o'clock Mr. Tancred was first; but Mr. Fitz Gerald gradually drew ahead, and at 12o'clock he was 20 in advance. Mr. Tancred's friends made strenuous efforts and succeeded 111 reducing the m-ijoritv to 7. when the poll closed.

The Final Stave op the Poll. Christchurch. Lyttelton. Akaroa. Total. Fitz Gerald . . 87 41 7 135 Campbell ... 14 46. 34 94 Tancred .... 80 7 2 S9 Total polled .181 94 43 318~ Majority for Mr. F. over Col. Campbell ... 41 a „ Mr. Tancred ... 46

■ Ly-telton was in a state of great excitement from an early hour. About' 10 o'clock a procession was-.formed of Colonel Campbell's supporters headed -with a band, led by a drummajor flourishing a broom. On two poles were displayed by way of banners a blue and red shirt (lent for the occasion by the Maoris) surmounted with loaves, of very opposite dimensions ; lhe larger one intended, we understand, to represent Colonel Campbell and the flood of prosperity his election would secure ; the-smaller one, Mr. Fitz Gerald and the maximum of prosperity his success would produce. Without intending it, the shirts admirably- represented the state and feelings of the Colonel's supporters at the' close of the poll; the blue one the state of their looks when they heard their gallant Candidate was yvhere we" have never heard he was before, in the rear; the red one the hectic flush of temporary triumph which the neyvs from Akaroa threw them into. In the evening a numerous meeting of Mr.. Fitz Gerald's supporters took place at the Mitre, where his success was celebrated with speeches, glees, aud songs. The healths of the defeated Candidates yveie drank with due honours, and thns terminated the most exciting day Lyttelton has had since its foundation.— Communicated. J

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Bibliographic details

Lyttelton Times, Lyttelton Times, Volume III, Issue 133, 23 July 1853

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1,561

Lyttelton Times Lyttelton Times, Volume III, Issue 133, 23 July 1853

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