Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

The Lyttelton Times.

January 15, 1853. Stormy weather which generally prevents Vessels from entering our Port, has, during the last few days, had the somewhat unusual effect of driving in no less than three, which had cleared out from Wellington foxother destinations. The incidence is somewhat remarkable, as they were laden with flour, and bound for places where no demand exists for that article, owing to the peculiar fact of no inhabitants residing there to consume it. Jhe people of Canterbury have, however, experienced the benefits

supposed to be derived from the old saw that " it is an ill wind that blows nobody good ;" for flour has lately been at almost famine prices, and these arrivals are all the more seasonable from being unexpected.

There are people censorious enough to believe that stovmy weather had nothing whatever to do with the matter, and that it was never intended the vessels should fetch any other destination than Lyttelton. We cannot entertain this opinion for an instant; we cannot suppose that the merchants of Wellington (honorable men, all, doubtless!) would jeopardise their fair names by deliberately clearing their vessels for false destinations, in the hope of plundering the people of Canterbury by obtaining fictitious prices for their commodities. No ; they are above this " dodge ;" they were deceived, and sent their flour to Port Underwood and the East Coast, in the expectation that new Settlements had been suddenly formed in those places. The matter as it turns out, however, is immaterial; for if deceit was intended, it has signally failed; for the fall in the price of flour in the Australian markets was known here, and there is a reasonable expectation that those who hoped to dupe, will, in vulgar parlance, burn their fingers—a consummation most devoutly to be wished for.

We are greatly surprised at the apathydisplayed by the grievance-mongers on this occasion. We had fully expected that a meeting would have been convened to protest against the attempt to keep the poor man's bread at famine rates. No stir, has, however, been made, the occasion not being deemed one from which political capital could, we suppose, be derived. The public in the mass, however, are sufferers; for not only have they been deprived of their letters and newspapers from the other Settle-.' ments, but a large English mail, by the " Simlah," is, we hear, now at Wellington awaiting an opportunity for conveyance here. This is an unmistakable grievance, which, we hope, the exposure of the flour " dodge" will in future remedy'; for we do not anticipate any speculators will, for some, time to come at least, attempt to realize high rates by concealing truth—in plain English—by falsehood. :

At the ordinary Meeting of the Lytteltori Colonists* Society, on Wednesday, Mr. Fitzgerald brought forward a motion, of which he had given notice, with respect to the present law of Trespass. Mr. Fitzgerald spoke at some length on the subjectj and pointed out how necessary it was to have the law modified and clearly defined, as at present the Magistrates hacl the 1 invidious task, not of administering the law, but, ofdeficin'g it, which necessary led tp'fi clashing of opinions. Considerable discussion ensued, and ultimately it was proposed by Mr. Reader, an,d seconded by Mr. Alport—

"That a Subcommittee be appointed to draw up a report upon the law of Trespass, as at present enforced in this Settlement, and to surest such alteration as may be thought desirable ; the committee to consist of Messrs. Dobbs, Ward, Moorhouse, Fitzgerald, Hamilton, Win. Graham, and Merry."

Mr. Fitzgerald announced that Captain Simeon had placed at the disposal of the Society the chemical apparatus sent out by the Canterbury Association for the use.of the proposed college ; also that Captain Simeon would be happy to hand over to the

Societies of Lyttelton and Christchurch the books in his possession (some 1,500 volumes) also belonging to the college, so soon as proper shelves were erected in ,the libraries to receive them. The Lyttelton Society have undertaken to do this for half the volumes, so that their library will soon be considerably enlarged; a circumstance we mention, now that the Quarterly Subscriptions are due, in the expectation it will cause a considerable addition to the Library Members.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/LT18530115.2.10

Bibliographic details

The Lyttelton Times., Lyttelton Times, Volume III, Issue 106, 15 January 1853

Word Count
706

The Lyttelton Times. Lyttelton Times, Volume III, Issue 106, 15 January 1853

Working