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The Lyttelton Times

May 1, 1852. On Saturday last the Stone of the first church in the Canterbury Settlement, was laid. That eighteen months should have elapsed, and that no consecrated building, should have been erected, in a Settlement established upon the peculiar scheme of the Canterbury Association, has called forth much severe criticism from the friends of that body, and many taunts from its opposers. Though we do not acquit the Association of all blame, yet has much of that criticism been exaggerated, and many of those taunts

been undeserved. In the first place, we hold that Captain Thomas was right in not expending any part of the funds at his disposal in ecclesiastical buildings. When Captain Thomas was at work, it was still very doubtful whether the scheme of the Association would ever become a reality. It was, therefore, right that the mo'iey at his disposal, should be invested in suikfrworks as would give an artificial value to the land, and thereby render it a commercial security for the money which would have been charged upon the New Zealand Company-had the Canterbury Association failed to commence its undertaking. The moment, however, colonization under the Association commenced public faith certainly required that a church should have been immediately built. Mr. Godley has, however, frequently declared in public, that he has never had funds at his disposal, which he coulct~devote to the work. No doubt there were other parts of the Ecclesiastical scheme, such as the establishment of a Bishopric, and the endowments for clergy and for schools, which the Association were equally hound to provide. The question, therefore, resolves itself into one respecting the whole expenditure of the Ecclesiastical fund, and it would clearly be unfair and unreasonable in the public, to censure any individual instance of apparent neglect or mal-administration, unti they shall have before them, a clear statement of the whole expenditure of the Ecclesiastical fund. The real matter, however, of which the colonists may, and do complain is this, that such a statement has been withheld, and in the new Society which is about to be formed in this settlement, we hope that the colonists will unite in an earnest remonstrance upon this point. We hV>pe that they will peremptorily require, and will never rest satisfied until they obtain, a regular quarterly account of the receipt and expenditure of all monies passing through the Association on account of the Land Fund of the settlement. The scene which occurred on Saturday last in Lyttelton, was one which affords matter of congratulation to all friends of the Church ; for in so far as the Association may have fallen short of its engagement, whether arising from the limited sale of land, or from an injudicious expenditure of the funds which that sale placed in its hands, the settlers have themselves stepped in to supply the deficiency, and a church is really commenced. ,

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/LT18520501.2.10

Bibliographic details

The Lyttelton Times, Lyttelton Times, Volume II, Issue 69, 1 May 1852

Word Count
483

The Lyttelton Times Lyttelton Times, Volume II, Issue 69, 1 May 1852

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