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PUBLIC MEETING AT LYTTELTON.

The question of the communication between Lyttelton and the Plains was submitted on Friday sennight to a public meeting of the inhabitants of Lyttelton, held at the "Mitre" Hotel.

Mr. Godlkt, who was requested to take the chair, opened the meeting hy saying, that the occasion which had brought them together was not one which called for much speechifying; they had met simply to pronounce an opinion upon the best mode of opening an easier and better communication with the plains than they at present possessed. This was a question in which all were interested, and of the importance of which, at any rate, all were equally competent to judge. As agent of the Canterbury Association he might state, at the outset, that he could not see the smallest chance of sufficient funds for the purpose arising from the sale of land, and he had considered therefore that it would be wiser to expemMhejsums of money that from tune^ to" time~earne into hfs hands in ess »" importance, but more immediately feasible, than the Sumner Road ; a course which he thought had been generally approved by the colonists.

Mr. Cookson said, I am called upon to more the first resolution,* which I do with the greatest satisfaction, viewing it of the utmost importance that free communication should, be speedily obtained between the consuming and producing portions of the settlement, a subject upon which I believe both sides of the hill will be unanimous.

Mr. Spowers seconded the resolution, which was then carried unanimously.

Captain Simeon said that he had a resolution to propose, upon which it would be needless to speak many words, as the necessity for it was so self-evident. It had indeed been suggested by some parties that the road should not be carried out, because ultimately it must give place to railroad and steam communication through the hills, but that did not meet the present necessity. He would remark that the amount of energy and success displayed by the settlers on the plains while without a road from the inability of the Association to furnish funds, proved what they would do if the road were made, and it would therefore be most unjust and cruel to keep them without an easier communication, now that there was a chance of obtaining it, because forsooth they were abie to do without it. He would mention that a short time since he had an interview with Sir George Grey, who, as no doubt was well known, had justly the credit of being an able practical engineer, and that his Excellency was fully convinced that the road should be made as quickly as possible. Sir George had himself irone over the line proposer], and it was his opinion that it might be made practicable for actual traffic for a comparatively small amount, and that the work of improving it might be gone on with as the colony became more able to bear the expense. His Excellency had further stated, that under those circumstances and upon those conditions he should be happy to assist in the formation of the road with Government fund?.

Captain Simeon then moved the second resolution, which was seconded by Mr. Bayfikld.

Mr. Spcwers inquired what amount of practicability it was proposed to aim at. The Chairman- stated that it was a question lie was not prepared to answer, indeed he had no very great faith in the possibility of making a very accurate estimate of the work. It was plain, however, that the estimate which had been given provided for its being1 completed in a workmanlike manner, but at present they must be content with a road in an unworkmanlike manner, until their means were greater. Mr. Cridland was. however present, and perhaps could answer the question of Mr. Spowers. Mr. Ciudi-axd said, that if required, he would undertake to state, on'consideration, what amount of practicability might be attained by the expenditure of any given sum. At the same time he must say, in justice to himself and to his profession, that at the usual rate of wages, the road could be made for the amount lie had estimated, and he would himself tender to perform it for that amount in the event of no other tender being offered. (Hear, hear.) Mr. ivKAD suggested a Hue of road below the present bridle path. ( Continued in p. 6. ) ♦ The resolutions wore the same as those pushed at Christchurch, and published in our lust papor, with the exception of the third, which we give in its place.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/LT18520110.2.5

Bibliographic details

PUBLIC MEETING AT LYTTELTON., Lyttelton Times, Volume II, Issue 53, 10 January 1852

Word Count
761

PUBLIC MEETING AT LYTTELTON. Lyttelton Times, Volume II, Issue 53, 10 January 1852

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