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MEETING OF THE SOCIETY OF LAND PURCHASERS.

The Quarterly General Meeting of the So- , ciety of Land Purchasers was held at Christ- > church on Thursday last. Mr. Bbittan, in opening the meeting as President, said that at a former meeting he had been called upon to refer * to the painful report, afterwards confirmed, of the loss by drowning of Mr. Edward Robert Ward and his brother. He regretted to say that since that meeting the colony had sustained, if possible, a still greater loss; he referred to that of Mr. Wm. Deans, and he thought the society would only be discharging their duty and paying a deserved tribute of respect to his memory by thus noticing his untimely death. The minutes of the previous meetings having been read and confirmed, Mr. Buittan proceeded to lay before the Society the Report of the Council for the last six months, together with the Correspondence and Memorial therein referred to, (and which we reprint in our sixth and seventh pages.) The following is the report, -which was unanimously adopted by the meeting. " Report of tjie Council to the General Meeting of the Society of Land Purchasers, held at Christchurch, on Thursday, the 2nd October, 1851. A quorum not having been formed at tbe last quarterly general meeting, it becomes the duty of the Council to lay before tbe Society the result of their labours during tbe last six months. The first subject which lias occupied their attention has been tbe completion of the Sumner Road. The estimate of tbe whole cost of that work having been completed, ani laid before tbe Council, a special-committee was appointed to examine its details and report to the Council. But there being reason to believe that much difference of opinion existed amongst the settlers generally, as to the most desirable and most readily attainable means of communication between the Port and the Plains, tbe special committee were instructed to extend their enquiry to the whole subject. This committee lias not yet completed its labours ; but the Council are informed that a great deal of valuable evidence has been collected, and that their report may be shortly expected. Tbe Council are strongly impressed with the conviction that an entire unanimity of opinion on the part of the settlers is essential to the accomplishment of so great an undertaking. They therefore propose to lay the whole of the report and evidence before the public, in a printed form, previous to the next general meeting of the Society. This question lias assumed additional interest from intelligence which has been recently recoived, to the effect that tbe Canterbury Association in England are engaged in endeavouring to raise a large sum of money for the purpose of carrying on the public works in the colony. Should this money be shortly transmitted to the settlement, it will be within tho province of tbe Society to recommend the best mode of its appropriation. The subject of the appointments made by the Colonial Government to local public offices in the settlement lias occupied the attention of the Council. The minute of the general meeting of the 3rd April, recommending Mr. Bajlard to the office of landing waiter, having been transmitted to his Excellency tbe Governor-in-Chief, a correspondence ensued on the subject of that and other appointments. These letters the Council now lay before the Society, in tbe confidence that it will ' approve the course they have adopted. The policy recommended by the resolutions of the Special General meeting of the 28th July, in reference to the'pasturage regulations,c.has been carried out by Mr, Godley ; but a danger has been apprehended that runs would be taken up under those conditions by mere speculators, for the purpose of resale at a jrrolit, and with no bona fide intention to stock them. The Council agreed to a suggestion that Mr. Godley should require from all persons for whom runs were reserved under those conditions, a deposit at the rate of jglOO for 20,000 acres, to be forfeited if the run were not stocked in nine months. The Council conceive that this regulation is necessary to protect tbe interests of the bona fide importers of stock, and strongly recommend its adoption by the general meeting. The Society are doubtless informed that memor-

ials have been recently sent to England from the General Legislative Council of New Zealand, for presentation to hef Majesty, in which statements are made |and opinions expressed which, if uncontradicted'and unanswered, are not unlikely to prove of lasting injury to the interests of this settlement. The Council have therefore prepared a counter memorial which they now recommend to the adoption of the meeting, and which they propose to send to England in the name of the Land Purchasers, for presentation to Her Majesty, and to both houses of Parliament.

In reference to the expenditure of the funds at the disposal of the agent, the Council have continued to point out such works as appeared to them of the most pressing importance; and their suggestions have been uniformly complied with. The most important of these works liave been the formation of the road from Christchurch to Riccarton. This work the Council undertook to advise, notwithstanding the resolution of the General Meeting of the 3rd of April, and they request the special attention'of the Society to their Minute of the 12th of April, recoi ding that decision. They subsequently recommended the continuation of that road as far as the dry land beyond the swamps, so as to complete the communication between Christchurch and the great pasturage district, and also the continuation of the new road from the Ferry to the Market-Place in Christchurch, and the construction of a temporary cart bridge over the Avon at that spot, all of which works will shortly be completed.

Under the head of Ecclesiastical expenditure, whilst of opinion that the first and most important of all objects is tbe investment of funds in permanent securities, so as to increase the endowments for the clergy, the Council have recommended the expenditure of 500/. in the erection of a Church, at Lyttleton, upon the condition that an equal sum can be raised by private subscription towards that object. In the unavoidable absense of the Clerk at Wellington, the Council are not able to lay before the Meeting the account and estimate of expenses for the next six months.

The Council cannot conclude this report without congratulating the Society upon the rapid progress and favourable prosperity of the colony, and upon the generous and eminently successful efforts of the members of the Association in England, to continue the tide of emigration to this settlement."

The memorial to Her Majesty for the purpose of meeting the memorials recently sent home from the Legislative Council was unanimously agreed to. Mr. Fitzgerald moved that the memorial be now sent to His Excellency tbe Governor-in-Chief, with, a respectful request that his Excellency would be pleased to transmit it to England for presentation to Her Majesty, and that a petition in similar language be presented to both Houses of Parliament, and that Lord Lyttelton be requested to present it in the Lords, and Mr. Adderly in the Commons. This proposition was carried unanimously.

Mr. Wixlock moved the addition to the 10th clause of the Rules, of the following words: " Provided always that when the sense of the Council is to be ascertained on any public matter, it shall be necessary that a quorum be present of members entirely unconnected by official ties with the Association." He did not wish to bring up unpleasant feelings, but he thought this alteration would tend to allay certain existing prejudices, and prevent the possibility of the discussions of the Council being unduly biassed by those who might be supposed to be influenced more or less by Mr. G-odley's (particular views. Ma. Fitzgerald shewed from the Minutes of the Council that there had been a majority of members who were not connected with the Association present at every meeting of the Council, with only two exceptions. Some discussion took place on this motion, until Mr. Brittan stated that the motion was out of order, the loth clause resolved upon at a former meeting providing that no alteration should be made in the rules without the consent of two-thirds of the registered members of the Society, and a sufficient number was not therefore present to enter into Mr. Willoek's motion. Mr. Pollard said the same reason would prevent his bringing forward his intended motion relative to trie franchise; of the Society. Mr. HarmaS wished to caYl attention to the intended line of road between Christchurch andPapauui ; thut-B wero two parts of that line of road, which, if made, wr.;:M render the bush accessible, and he tho ight this was a public work which claimed to be performed, at least, rtpsn'iy with the Lincoln and Ellesmere road. The expeu.se would, he thought, be considerable. Mr. E. J. Wakefibld said he had a suggestion !o make which would not involve any great expense. Mr Hcoddart had reeent'y discovered a substance within tho CVaU'rbury Block, which, if not coal, at an y rate answered iiu* purpose of coal, to use his own words, " which made t-io rift boil ;" the seam was on Mr. Stoddart's run, and wax said ro ho 15 feet thick, and ha would recommend that tho Societyshould dispatch a practical person to the spot, with a view of ascertaining the possibility of its being worked, .to. Mr. Bishop complained that the road was iiomsc mr.da into tho heart of Christchurch with a wide ditch iin both sides, by which the houses were completely cut off, and every inhabitant put to the necessity aud expense oi" smvkiug a bridgo to his home. Mr. Dobsox moved that Mr. Godley's attention V.c called to the matter, with n yiewof.asccrtaiu.irts whether tho road was being made in tho manlier most conuuiive to the interests of the town. «-""*^ Tliid was agreed to, aud th^ Jtiugthen dissolved,

The following is the Correspondence relative to appointments in Canterbury, referred to as being read at the Meeting of the Society of Land Purchasers on Thursday.

Port Lyttelton, Aug. 18, 1851. Sir, —I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of May 14th, containing His Excellency's reply to my letter of the 6th of that month, in reference to the appointment of a Post-master to this place. lam also instructed to acknowledge } Tour communication of the 11 th of June last to the late E. R. "Ward, Esq., in answer to that gentleman's letter of the 11th April, written on behalf of the Society of Land-purchasers, recommending Mr. J. F. Ballard for the permanent appointment of landing-waiter iv this settlement, on the supposition that that office was at the time unfilled; and I am instructed in the name of the Council to request that you will convey to His Excellency the expression of their thanks for the promptitude with which he has replied to these, several communications, as well as for the courteous language in which those replies were conveyed. The Council hope that His Excellency will not consider them presumptuous if, after having received these answers, they venture once more to trespass upon His Excellency's attention, by again reverting to the general subject of this correspondence, but they feel called upon to do so, as well on account of the great and general feeling of anxiety on this subject which pervades all classes in this settlement, as because there appears to exist some misapprehension on the mind of His Excellency ■with respect to the real object and intention of the communications which they have had the honour of addressing to him. His Excellency's well-known desire to be guided, as far as may be compatible with general convenience, by the well-ascertained wishes of the colonists in the different settlements, has emboldened the Council to lay before His Excellency their earnest request that he would be pleased to appoint resident colonists to the various offices that may be required in this settlement, and, in doing so, they beg to assure His Excellency that the Canterbury settlers would willingly renounce all claim to any share of His Excellency's patronage in other settlements, if, by such a renunciation, they could be assured that all vacant offices in their own settlement would be filled by members of their own body. It was to solicit the recognition of this principle, as the one most conducive, in their opinion, to their own prosperity and success, that the Council ventured to address His Excellency on the subject of the two appointments already referred to, and not because they had reason to object, on the score of unfitness to the only gentleman appointed by His Excellency who has yet entered upon his duties. On the contrary, they are bound to acknowledge that Mr. Howard, the gentleman referred to, and against whose appointment they felt called upon to remonstrate, has, during the short time that he has already been in the settlement, given general satisfaction by the manner in which he has discharged the duties of his office. In making this renewed appeal to His Excellency on this subject, the Council desire to guard against its being supposed that they are advancing a claim on the grounds of right, (though they cannot overlook the fact that promises and engagements on this head were hell out to them before they left England,) they are however far from wishing to interfere in the least with His Excellency's undoubted prerogative to dispose in any way he may think best of the whole patronage of the colonj' ; their object is respectfully, but earnestly, to solicit that His Excellency wiil be pleased so to administer that patronage as not to disappoint the expectations which the settlers in Canterbury were encouraged to indulge in, that the local offices of the colony would be filled by men permanently attached to the principles and interests of the settlement. I have the honour to be, Sir, Your most obedient servant, W. G. Brittan. Alfred Dojiett, Esq., Colonial Secretary. Colonial Secretary's Office, Wellington, September 2ntl, 1851. Sir, —T am directed by the Governor-in-Chief to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 18th ultimo upon the question of public appointments in the Canterbury Setilement; and in reply, I am to remark that His Excellency feels great difficulty in corresponding with a body sucli as the Council of the Society of Land Purchasers, when they claim to express the general opinion of all the Canterbury Settlers, as His Excellency is by no means aware that they represent the whole of the interests in that settlement. But, as the communications they have addressed to him have been so unobjectionable in themselves, and relate to subjects regarding which, by whatever denomination they style themselves, they must naturally £uel a deep interest, His Excellency altogether wai^^for the present what is ziow

a mere matter of form, in order that a substantial advantage may be gained; and has therefore instructed me to convey to you for the information of the Couucil of the Society, the following observations upon their communication made through you. Representative institutions being now about to be introduced into the colony, it is probable, in consequence of recommendations which His Excellency has made, that he will shortly be relieved altogether from the onerous and extremely unpleasant duty of making appointments to what may be properly termed Provincial Offices, which duty His Excellency presumes will devolve upon the Governments of the Provinces; until, however, such is the case, His Excellency will, in as far as practicable, fill up the appointments alluded to either from persons resident in the province, or who have come out from' England with the intention of settling there. But I am further to remark, that there is another class of appointments connected with the General Government of the country, such as the Customs' Department, the Post-Office, and Land Departments, for the proper administration of the patronage of which His Excellency will be responsible to the General Legislature, and not to any Provincial Council, and the persons nominated to fill the higher situations in which will be those entitled to such appointments by long service and experience in public business. The junior offices in these departments will, as a general rule, be filled up in the provinces in which they occur, and if a vacancy in the senior branches of a department takes place in one province, and is filled by the promotion of an officer from another province, the vacancy caused in junior branches by the promotion which will take place will be filled up by a candidate from the province in which the first vacancy occurred. In conclusion, I am desired to add, that His Excellency must be understood as only stating a general rule which it may not be possible always to observe; and further, it must he understood, that his Excellency has no power in any way to bind his successor, or to abridge any powers with which he may be entrusted. I have the honour to be, Sir, . . Your most obedient servant, Alfred Domett, Colonial Secretary. \Y. G-. Brittan, Esq., J.P., &c, Canterbury. The following is the Memorial adop ted on. Thursday by the Society of Land-Purchasers for presentation to Her Majesty, for the purpose of meeting the Address lately sent home by the Legislative Council. To Her Most Gracious Majesty Victoria, by the Grace of God Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Bfc. "We, your Majesty's most dutiful and most faithful subjects, the purchasers of land from the Canterbury Association, in public meeting assembled, in venturing to address your Majesty upon a subject of deep importance to the well being of our community, desire to assure your Majesty of our loyalty and devotion to your Majesty's throne and person. The Canterbury Association was formed in the year 1848, for the purpose of founding a Settlement in New Zealand, upon the plan of selling land at the rate of 31. per acre, and of devoting the proceeds to the purposes of emigration, to useful public works in the Settlement, and to making provision for the education and spiritual instruction of the people, according to the tenets of the Church of England. To this plan your Majesty's Government and the Imperial Parliament were pleased to give their deliberate sanction, by the Incorporation of the Association under Royal Charter, and by the passing of an Act of Parliament to enable them to i carry their plans into Execution. Your Majesty's | Secretary of State for the Colonies, was further | pleased to instruct His Excellency, the Governor-in-Chief of this colony, that he should give every assistance in his power to the operations of the Association within the limits of his government. In obedience to these instructions, His Excellency was pleased to sanction the selection of this district, as the site of the settlement about to be formed.

Encouraged by these solemn and repeated public guarantees of the sanction and approval of the government of their own country and of the colony, in the foundation of the Settlement upon the principles set forth in the Royal Charter, we, together with the numerous body on whose behalf we address your Majesty, purchased land from the Canterbury Association, and we embarked ourselves, our families, and our fortunes, in the foundation of this settlement.

We desire respectfully to represent to your Majesty that great success has hitherto attended the trial of the experiment. That fourteen ships have arrived in this port in the course of nine months ; in which, owing to the careful provisions made by the Association, the sickness and deaths which have occurred during their voyages have been small be •

yond all former precedent. That a population of about 3000 souls has thus collected in a country which a few months ago was an unoccupied waste: that an excellent survey has been made of a large district by means of which, all those who have purchased land, are enabled to select their sections immediately upon their arriving, and are placed in r possession of their properties with the least possible / delay and expense. That a considerable quantity of / land is enclosed, that above five hundred acres will I be in cultivation before the first harvest, and that the quantity of land brought into cultivation is daily and rapidly increasing. That two towns have arisen, in which temporary churches have I*sen erected, and that we have never been deprived for a single day of the means of worshipping God after the manner of our fathers. That there are good schools ; in iboth of the towns, and that a college upon the plan of the English Universities, has already been commenced. Such having been the progress of this settlement in the course of a few months, under the sanction and favour of your Majesty's Government, we have been greatly alarmed, and are deeply aggrieved, by learning from sources which are to be relied on, that your Majesty's representative in this colony, has, upon several recent occasions, whilst presiding over the General Legislative Council of New Zealand, expressed very strong disapprobation of the principles and proceedings of the Association j notwithstanding that those principles and proceedings have been repeatedly sanctioned by your Majesty's government, and have been attended with such remarkable success. In addition to these strong expressions of opinion condemning this Settlement, His Excellency has been pleased to forward for presentation to your Majesty, two Memorials from the General Legislative Council, professing to convey to your Majesty the sentiments of the inhabitants of these Islands in accordance with those put forward by Hi 3 Excellency in the Chair of the Council, and hostile to the proceedings of this Settlement, and especially praying that your Majesty will be pleased to refuse any extension of the district now entrusted to the management of the Canterbury Association, and that your Majesty will be pleased to cause all the lands within these Islands to be sold at the same uniform-price. • We deeply grieve to be called upon to represent to your most gracious Majesty that the Memorials thus transmitted contain many statements which are wholly without foundation. It is not true that." under the regulations of the Canterbury Association, land cannot be sold under three pounds an acre, of which two pounds are to be devoted to religious and educational purposes," only one pound per acre being devoted to those purposes. It is not true that "all your Majesty's subjects who are not members of the Church of England, are deprived of the right of using one of the finest and most extensive districts in the country, as a field for their enterprize," many persons having arrived, and having acquired property in this settlement, who are not members of that Church. It is not true that above 200 souls are resident at Akaroa, who profess the Roman Catholic religion. The whole population of Akaroa at the time when we arrived in the colony amounted to no more than * souls, of whom only* were Roman Catholics. It is true that if any of the land-owners in Akaroa desired to increase their properties, they would have to pay SI. for every acre, but we.desire to represent to your Majesty that the land which they would purchase would be worth the sum charged, without entering upon any consideration as to what might be done with the money. The formation of the Canterbury Settlement, instead of being an injury, has been a great advantage to the settlers at Akaroa, by affording them a market for their produce : and should any of the old settlers desire now to increase their properties they will'probably have been enabled to do so solely by the establishment of the Canterbury Settlement] in this neighbourhood, without which it would probably not have been worth their while, or within their means, to have acquired additional land. It is not true, so far as we are informed, that the ■' Canterbury Association has ever contemplated acquiring an extension of the territory committed to their trust. The only cause for the alarm ■which has been expressed to your Majesty upon this matter consists in a request made, not by the Canterbury Association, but by your Majesty's memorialists, in this Settlement that the Canterbury Association should if possible obtain an enlargement of the block over which they possess rights of sale and ; pasturage, so as to include the whole of the great ?jj plain in which the block is situated, and which is / entirely cut off from the! other] settlements of New Zealand by impassable mountains and rivers. We desire to disclaim in the strongest terms any wish to encroach upon the limits of the other settlements in New Zealand. Within the district which your Majesty and the Imperial Parliament have been graciously pleased to assign to us, there are still • Those numbers will be correctly filled in beforo the Memorial is sent.

Tast tracts of land admirably adapted for all kinds of agricultural and pastoral purposes, and which are still open for purchase and occupation; until ' those are taken up, we have no immediate interest , in, or desire for the enlargement of the district as- ■ signed to us; nor even then, if such an enlargement should be found inconsistent with the interests of the neighbouring settlements. jßut we made the proposal above referred to because we foresaw the inconvenience likely to arise from having different parts of the same natural district, the whole produce of which will pass through the same ports, under different and perhaps conflicting pasturage regulations. The district which we thus proposed should be added to Jthis settlement, is not, as has been represented to ■"'your Majesty, one containing a population who would be deprived of the privilege of enlarging their properties by the restrictive regulations of this settlement, there being, with the exception of three or four unlicensed squatters, no inhabitants whatever in its whole extent.

We deeply grieve to bfe compelled thus to point out the inaccuracies and misstatements which have been conveyed to your Majesty, the more so that these misstatements have received the sanction of the highest authority in this colony. But we cannot do this without most respectfully representing to your Majesty that the General Legislative Council of New Zealand, in which these attacks have been made, not being elected by the inhabitants, but being nominated by his Excellency the Governor-in-chief, do not possess the confidence and do not speak the sentiments of the inhabitants of this colony. That they are not authorized to represent the inhabitants of New Zealand in any manner whatsoever, and that their representation of the feelings of the settlers is one upon which no reliance can be placed.

At the same time we cannot conceal from ourselves that there is cause for great alarm lest the which have been made upon our settlement by the highest authority of your Majesty's Government in* this colony may inflict the deepest injury upon us. We fear lest the public and our friends in England may think that your Majesty's sanction is withdrawn from our undertaking—we fear lest the hostility of the Local [Government may stop the sales of land in England, and thereby destroy the progress and the prospects of this colony. We therefore most respectfully but most earnestly pray that your Majesty will be graciously pleased to cause a measure to be introduced into the Imperial Parliament during the ensuing session for the purpose of granting to this colony a constitutional Parliament, elected by the inhabitants of the colony in the place of the nominated Council at present existing?; because we are convinced that the establishment of such a form of government will alone protect us against a repetition of those attacks which have been recently made upon this settlement; and will alone protect your Majesty from those misrepresentations as to the sentiments of your Majesty's subjects in this colony, which have been recently made to your Majesty. And your Majesty's most loyal and most faithful subjects will ever pray. Signed on behalf of the whole body of Land Purchasers. W. G. Brittan, President. [From the Government Gazette, September 6.] An Address to the Crown by the Legislative Council, on the proposed extension of the limits of the Canterbury Territory. (Laid before the Council August 2, 1851.) To Her Most Gracious-Majesty Victoria, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Queen, Defender of the Faith and so forth. We, Your Majesty's most dutiful and faithful Servants, Members of the Legislative Council of New Zealand in Council assembled, in venturing to address your Majesty on a subject of importance to the interests of many of the Inhabitants of this Colony, beg leave to assure your Majesty of our loyalty and devotioi?_feoyour Majesty's throne andperson. From sources which are to be relied upon, we are ib/£ormed that a certain Body of your Majesty's subjects incorporated under the Great Seal of the Realm by the style and title of the Canterbury Association of New Zealand, to whom your Majesty lias been graciously pleased to grant for ten years an exclusive right of sale and pasturage over two and a half rniHions of acres of the Crown Demesnes in tins Colony, propose, and are about to apply to your Majesty for an extension of the territory already granted to them. ' c view with al»rm the possibility of your 1 v^esty's Government acceding to such a request. Under the regulations of the Canterbury Association- land cannot be sold under three pounds an acre, , pIC T tWO P°unds are t0 be devoted to religious and t educational purposes. But all your Majesty's subjects therefore who are not members of the Church of England are deprived of the right of one of the finest and most extensive districts in the country as a field for their enterprise, and a means

of realising those benefits in the anticipation of which so many of them emigrated to this colony. But while the injury inflicted upon them is confined to a mere diminution of the advantages the colony would otherwise offer to them, a more positive injury has been perhaps inadvertently done to another body of your Majesty's subjects who were settled, before the Canterbury Associatkn obtained its Charter, upon the lands which it has placed at their sole disposal. Above 200 souls are resvdent at Akaroa, who profess the Roman Catholic faith. Every land-owner among those, before he can obtain an increase of the pittance of land at present occupied by him, (to the acquisition of however small a portion of additional land he may limit his wishes,) must for every'acre he purchases contribute a sum of £1 to the support of a religion he conscientiously disapproves of and dissents from. On the unfairness and hardship of this result of the monopoly of the Association, we trust it is not necessary for us to dilate. But the amount of injustice already done would be greatly increased by an extension of that monopoly to lands, the beneficial occupation of which is at present enjoyed or attainable by your Majesty's subjects belonging to the Presbyterian settlement of Otago, or to that of Nelson, inhabited by a population composed of a variety of religious sects distinguishedhitherto by their freedom from sectarian intolerance and exclusiveness, and for the harmony with which they have dwelt together in the same community. Still greater would be the unfairness to the actual land purchasers in those settlements, because while it is notorious that a considerable number of them have never obtained for the capital they invested in the purchase and cultivation of their lands anything like an adequate return, they have been, and will be enabled by the opportunity of occupying for sheep pasture the land contiguous to these settlements in some measure to redeem thair losses, to recover their position, and to relieve themselves frem the disastrous consequences which would otherwise attend their emigration to this colony. The extension of the" Canterbury Block beyond its 'present limits would tend to deprive them in a great measure of the advantages just stated, and which in the case of the Nelson purchasers particularly, the difficulties they underwent in the early days of the colony's existence, we think it cannot but be owned they are justified in deeming themselves entitled to be maintained in possession of by an equitable and generous Government. On behalf t then of the inhabitants of New Zealand generally, and of the settlements just alluded to in particular, -we pray your Majesty, while allowing the Canterbury Association to carry out their great experiment fairly and freely within the ample limits assigned them, to be graciously pleased to withold your sanction from any attempt on their part to extend these limits and thus impose disabilities upon, and infringe the rights of others of your Majesty's subjects equally engaged with them in the arduous work of colonization.

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MEETING OF THE SOCIETY OF LAND PURCHASERS., Lyttelton Times, Volume I, Issue 39, 4 October 1851

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MEETING OF THE SOCIETY OF LAND PURCHASERS. Lyttelton Times, Volume I, Issue 39, 4 October 1851

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