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Local & General.

We remind parents and children that the Arrow Public .School re-opena on Monday next. A correspondent's letter for the Queenstown column was unfortunately received too late for publication in this issue.. Church of England services for Sunday next —11 a.m. Qneeenstown, 3 p.m H.C. Skippers Point, 7 p.m.. Bullcndale; Rev. A. D. Mitchell. Also 11 a.m. Arrow town, 7 p.m. Queenstown, We learn from the Cromwell Argus that the body of Mr Thomas Wilson, drowned in the Kawarau on the 11th, was found near Alexandra on Saturday night. Presbyterian Services for Sunday next : Rev. R. H. Blair, Arrow 11, Miller’s Flat 2.30., Queenstown 7. Mr Shore, Queenstown 11, Skippers, Bulleudale (Monday) Also service Arrow 7 p.m. His Lordship, Bishop Nevill, held Confirmation Service in the local Anglican Church last Sunday, when some 10 candidates were confirmed. In the evening Mis Lordship preached an excellent sermon. On both occasions the Church was crowded. Bishop Nevill intends to send a curate to Arrowtown. We omitted to mention last week that at the meeting of contributors to the Arrow Hospital, held on the Thursday previous, Messrs W. J. Stanford and John Allan were unanimously re-elected as members of the Board. The meeting was a large and most enthusiastic one, and many complimentary remarks were made with reference to the splendid work done by the committee. At Tuesday’s meeting of Arrow Borough Council,, the question of asphalting the footpaths in Buckingham street was discussed, and it was decided to test the feeling of residents on tne subject.. Should the Council receive sufficient inducement to go on with the work, they will pay. half-cost. It was also stated at the meeting that the asphalt would only coat between Is 6d to 2s per yagd, if done on an. extensive scale.. The cost,, therefore,, to the different householders would only be something like 9d to la per yard for the few yards they would require iu front of their property.. This is decidedly cheap and we hops to see a unanimous feeling in favor of the proposal.. The asp halt won dbe a great boon.to the residents, more especially iu the winter time., A unique and interesting wedding took place on board the s.s. Wakatipu while she was at Wellington the other afternoon, when a Chinese storekeeper from. Pahiatua w.is united in the bonds of matrimony to Miss Clung Fan, of Hongkong, The latter came by the Wakatipu in. charge of another Chinese lady, in the capaci y of chaperon, and left the boat only after she had become Mrs Chin Ting. The New Zhalind Times says that a formal application will be made for a refund' of the poll tax on Mrs Ting, and t; at if this is not complied with a test case will be instituted, a legal opinion having been given that a Chinese woman married to a naturalised Chinaman before landing in.New Zealand is under the existing law exempt from the poll tax. A man named Charley Lock Chong has been, committed for trial at Blacks for assaulting Jay Kooey with a tomahawk, causing him actual bodily harm. The Matakanui correspondent of the Uunstan Times, reporting the assault, says that when Charley arrived home on the night of the 15th inst. he found his bed occupied by his fellow countryman.. Charley being annoyed at this ordered the intruder, to leave, but on his refusal he savagely attacked him with a tomahawk,.breaking the man’s arm in two places and cutting a deep gash in hia foot.. Ots the next day Charley brought the constable from.Ophir and, gave the man in charge, but after an, investigation, whicn lasted a considerable time,, the c instable arrested Charley too, with the result above mentioned.

A petition is being circulated' ini Christchurch praying for the abolition of, the Legislative Council.. It is proposed, to circulate the p tition for signatures throughout t e whole colony, and present it to the House next session. Stupid though the idea is there will be found thousands of. people perfectly, willing to attach their names to.the petition.. A,petitioiiito behead the Premier

A Fo-xton storekeeper wan the other day importuned for food by one of the genus loafer. He promised to comply with the request if the man would cut some firewood. When the work was done (says a Manawatu paper) cash was demanded, and all the pains and penalties of the Truck Act threatened if the demand was not complied with. Sooner than have any bother the storekeeper paid 5s for the lesson. He will know better next time. At an inquest held at Peel Forest, near Timaru, into the death of a boy, Peter Finlayson, aged 11, the evidence showed he and his brother Robert, aged 13 quarrelled abiut who would fetch in the cows. The mother turned Kobert out of the house, but he returned with a piece of iron which he was swinging about, and it purposely or accidentally left his hand and hit Peter on the head, and penetrating the skull, killed him instantly. The boy said the iron slipped and that he only meant to frighten his brother, but the jury returned a verdict of “■ Manslaughter,” and the boy was arrested. An. invention, which seems likely to render telegraphic communication as direct and private as is telephonic, was displayed recently to a select company in Berlin. It has been christened by the hybrid name of “ Telescriptor,” and. takes the form of. an electric typewriter. This apparatus, which cost about £2s,.can be electrically connected by means of a call-b 11 with any other similar apparatus, and the message, which is type! off through the key-board at one end, will be reproduced in plain figures and numerals oa a plate at the other end. In other words, if, as the inventor claims, long distance communication can be established, the telescriptor will do for writing what the telephone effects for speech, and the publicity and complexity of ordinary telegraphic business will be done away with. The invention is the result of eight years’ labor on the part of an engineer named Hoffman. The Bulletin ; “ The scarcity of firewood iu Maoriland is a drawback to rural settlement in that country. The only way you can boil your billy is to fire the grass and follow the fiame with your billy held over it. On windy days you have to travel like a locomotive across miles of treacherous ground before the requisite temperature is obtained. Some of the Maoris, who are smart runners, command a high premium as fire chasers, but fr, queutly have to run so far that tho water is cold again by the time they get back.” Next ! “ People who have got heart disease usually don’t know it, and people who have not got it usually think they have ”—medical dictum at an inquest in Wellington. “ One woman out of three will say that her heart is weak,” remarked another medico. The greatest fortress in the world is Gibraltar. The height of the rock is 1,400 feet and this stupendous precipice is pierced by miles of gallaries in solid stone, portholes for cannon being placed at frequent intervals. The rock is perfectly impregnable to the shot of an enemy, and, by means of the great elevation, a plunging fire can he directed from an enormous height upon a hostile fleet. From the water batteries to a distance of two-thirds up the rock one tier after another of cannon is presented to the enemy. A garrison of from 5,000 to 10,000 is maintained, with provisions and ammunition for a six mouths’ siege. In 1719' the celebrated siege lasted three years. The fortress was successfully defended by 7,000 British and attacked by an army of over 40,000 men, with 1,000 pieces of artillery, 47 sail of the line, 10 great numbers of smaller boats. For months over 0,000 shells a day were thrown into the town. According to the Southern Cross, the Hon. J. G. Ward thinks that matrimony is one of the finest things in the world. To a man possessed of that treasure, a good wife, he says, the troubles of life vanish like the baseless fabric of a vision. Of every 1,000 inhabitants of the globe, 558 live in Asia. 242 in Europe, 111 in Africa 82 in America. 5 in Oceana and the Polar regions, and only 2 in Australia. Asia contains more than one half of the totil population of the earth, and Europe nearly ouefourth. The Queen’s will is engrossed on vellum, quarto size, and is bound as a volume, and secured by a private lock. Four Washington hollos, daughters of distinguished Government officials, have committed suicide within a month. The arrivals in the colony in December were 3,313, and the departures 1,160. One million and a-half men work in the coal mines of the world. Of those Great Britain has 535,000 ; the United States, 300,005; Germany 385,000; Belgium, 100,000 ; Russia, 44,000. The world’s miners of metal number 4,000,000. Saturday’s Waimate Times states that the Hessian fly has made its appearance iu the Waimate County, and is well distributed. This pest will be worse than sparrows if it gets well established, and will soon be all over the wheat country. A father with eight marriageable daughters advertised as a last resource to get them off his hands. He received the following telegram:—“Am a bachelor and wealthy. Will gladly marry one of your daughters. Send a sample at ones.” A house in a Maori trap jibbed at Masterton the other day, and the novel cure was tried of putting a handful of gravel in his mouth, with the result that in a few moments there only remained a cloud of dust to tell which way that horse had gone. The Standard, commenting on the late test cricket match, characterises the r suit as an unexpected and overwhelming defeat, and adds that the play of the Englishmen was disappointing throughout. Doctors differ on many tilings, and are not agreed upon the diet of children, app-.i rently (says the Argus), because one ordered barley-water to be given to a sick child at Brunswick, and when it died, and Dr Neild gave evi ence at the inquest, he said he was not at all surprised that the unfortunate child had died. “ He had no hesitation,” he remarked emphatically, “ in declaring that the ‘ diet’ of barley-water iu the case of the child under consideration was entirely wrong. Barley-w ter was not ford, and as an article of diet was little better than pure water.” A sensational affray has occurred in Paris. A notorious Anarchist named Etivant stabbed two policemen, and was arrested after a desperate struggle. Ktivanfc fired seven shots at bis captors when they placed him iu a coll. One of the most horrible lynchings ever known in Nevada occurred at Genoa, fourteen miles from Carson, at 2 o’clock oa the morning of December 7. Aram Über, who the previous week shot and killed Huua Anderson in a Millerville saloon, was hanged by a mob/of masked, men to-a cottonwood tree half-a-tnile distant from the gaol. When taken from his cell the victim had nothing on but a shirt.. This was torn off by the lynchers, and the nude body left dangling iu tho air for six hours. As the body was being pulled up the mob riddled it with bullet*. When satisfied that tho man was dead, tho vigilantes dispersed and returned to their homss. Über has a millionaire uncle, Henry Robson, in Pittsburg, Pa., and it is thought that the perpetratoia of this affair, may be brought to justice. Certainly the best medicine known is Sander and Son’s Eucalypti Extract. Test its eminently powerful effect in coughs, colds,, influenza ; the relief is instantaneous. In serious cases, aud in accidents of all kinds, bo they wounds, burns,, scaldings, bruises,, sprains, it is the safest remedy,—no swelling—no inflammation. Like surprising effects produced in> croup, diptheria, andl,bronchitis, inflammation of the lungs, awe ings, etc. ; diarrhea*, dysentery, disease- of the kidneys nod urinary organs.. In use at hospitals and medical clinics all over the globe ; patronised by His Majesty, the , .HBttgfaMi^UamA>E\h | bitiou, Amster-

Orpax, who is wanted ou a charge of the manslaughter of Susan M ‘Callum by malpractice in Auckland, has been arrested in San Francisco. He left the Alameda at Honolulu and went on by the next steamer. Detective Maddern leaves for ’Frisco to bring him back to New Zealand. Reasons Why Chamberlain's Colic, Cholera aud Diarrhoea Remedy is the Best. I. Because it affords almost instant relief in case of pain in the stomach, colic aud cholera morbus. 2; Because it is the only remedy that never fails in the most severe cases of dysentery and diarrhoea. 3. Because it is the only remedy that will cure chronic diarrhoea. 4. Because it is the only remedy that will prevent bilious colic. 5. Because it is the only remedy that will cure epidemical dysentery. G. Because it is the only remedy that can always be depended upon in cases of cholera infantum., 7.. Because- it is the most prompt and most reliable medicine in use for bowel complaints. 8. Because it produces no bad results. 9. Because it is pleasant and- safe to take.. 10. Because it has saved the lives of more people than any other medicine in the world. For sale by R. Pritchard, Arrowtown. “ Last summer one of our grand children w s sick with a severe bowel trouble,”'says Mrs E. G. Gregory, of Frederickstown, Mo. “ Out doctor’s- remedies had failed, then we tried Chamberlain’s Colic, Cholera and Diarrhoea Remedy, which gave very speedy relief.” Eor sale by R. Pritchard, .Arrowtown. You may hunt the world over and you will not find another medicine equal to Chamberlain’s Colic, Cholera and Diarrhoea Remedy for bowel complaints. It is pleasant, safe and reliable. For sale by R. Pritchard', Arrowtowu. CLARKE’S B 41 PILLS.“, to cure Gravel, Pains in the baand all kindred complaints. Free from Mercury. Es abiUh; I upwards of 30 years. In boxes Is dd ea:*h, of all Chemists and Patent Medicine Vendors throughout the World. Proprietor, The Lincoln and Midland Counties Drug Company, Lincoln, England Caution.—Purchasers of Clarke’s Blood Mixture, should see that they get the genuine article. Worthless imitations and substitutes are sometimes palmed off by unprincipled vendors. The words “ Lincoln and Midland Counties Drug Company, Lincoln, England,” are engraved on the Government Stamp, and “Clarke’s World-famed Blood Mixture,” blown on the bottle, without which none arc genuine,. Little 80-Peep Has lost her sheep, In spite of all her exertions If she is wise She’ll advertise In the Press—two insertions. Advertising is not a luxury ; it is a necessity !

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/LCP18980127.2.4

Bibliographic details

Local & General., Lake County Press, Issue 792, 27 January 1898

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2,448

Local & General. Lake County Press, Issue 792, 27 January 1898

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