Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

TENNIS.

Under the heading of ''English Socieiy iii.ti me 1 trims Liar.c." a leading pap^-r snoivs a pnotograph of Lady PerroLt, one of tn-e latest recruits to the ran&> of lawn {bums players', taking great pains to become efficient in the game. She is seen taking lessons from -Yir Il'. \Y. Lust, a well-known player and instructor.

It is wonderful how long some great players retain their form. .Late reports state that in the finals of the Surrey championships .at Surhiton N. 11;. Brookes and S. N. Do list defeated Kingscote and Gilbert, 4 —6, 6 —3, 6 —4, G—2. .Brookes was great in service and volley, playing the best game of his tour. Hi.s whipped return recalled his Vrimbletlon days when he piayed Doherty. In the semi-finals N. E. Brookes and S A Doust defeated Thomas and Eitchie, 6--3, 6—l-

Writing or tiie matches between New Zealand and Czechoslovakia, a correspondent says that there were large attendances and the crowd was most im partial. The New Zealanders were treated in the kindliest manner, and enjoyed the visit immensely. They are staying at Prague, this week participating in, a tournament in which the Swiss Davis Cup men are playing.

Much of the interest in the British Hard Courts Lawn Tennis championships <at Torquay (says a Home correspondent) was centred in the appearance of Norman Brookes, but the famous Australian has already been defeated in both singles and doubles. Brookes, of course, has taken no partin singles for-some time past, and his defeat caused no great surprise. H-is conqueror—the Anglo-Indian, F. R. L. Crawford —is more than a useful performer, and he is, moreover, in firstrate practice at the present time, having baen playing in all the tournaments on the French Riviera for three months past. In. spite of a most ungainly style, he is always a difficult man to beat, and is a rare "sticker." Brookes, after winning the first set, obviously tired, and Crawford was not slow to seize his opportunity, paining the next three sets fairly comfortably. It is quite probable that the loser was still feeling the effects of thn attack of influenza which he contracted on the Riviera, but apart from this, he is obviously a .long way below his old form in singles, a fact which, of course, is not to l;o wondered at.

Curiously enough, it was Crawford who again defeated Brookes in the doubles. Crawford /was partnered with another Angio'-Tndian, B. L. Cameron, whilst Brookes played with Lieut.-Colonel J. N. Bud ley* and it was generally expected that the lastname:) air wenld pull the match oft. Brookes, as a matter of fact, played a really fine p-amo. and showed himself almost as pood a doubles player as ever. 1-Jovrever, his partner was decidedly patchy, and the. AngloIndian pair had little difficulty in winning; in three straight sets. The Torquay meeting is 'not y<^t concluded, but the stages have been reached to-day. A area* feature has been the pay of the two Dutchmen, H. Timmer (g. younsrster of 19), and' C Van Lenneli. 'Timmer is evidently destined to make his mark in the lawn tennis world. He was beaten to-day by the English, inters a tional

J. .13.- Gilbert, but only after a'great struggle. Partner.shiife are already being fixed up for the championships, and I am given to understand that .7. I>. P. Wheatley, one of our lawn tennis hopes, will play with that brilliant all-rounder, Max Woosnam. Excepting It. Lycebt, Woosna-m is probably the best doubles player in the country, and this combination should give the strong overseas pair something to think about.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/HNS19240621.2.64.18

Bibliographic details

TENNIS., Hawera & Normanby Star, Volume XLVIII, Issue XLVIII, 21 June 1924

Word Count
600

TENNIS. Hawera & Normanby Star, Volume XLVIII, Issue XLVIII, 21 June 1924

Working