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CORFU INCIDENT

EUROPEAN PEACE

MENACE BY ITALY,

ATTITUDE OF FRANCE

LEAGUE'S RIGHT TO

INTERVENE

31 CABU— PRESS ASaOCIAQDIOtt—COPYBIGm LONDON, Sept. 6. The special correspondent of the Daily Express at Athens says that if the Italians remain in undisputed possession! of Corfu there will undoubtedly be serious trouble, ending in., possibly, another Balkan war. Serbian newspapers are alqeady declaring that Serbia will support Greece, while reports from i Turkey show that a section of opinion is already urging Kemal to seize the opportunity to invade Western Thrace.

The Daily Telegraph's diplomatic correspondent says therer is a grave phrase in S^gnor -Mussolini's latest declarations. . He threatens to remain, indefinitely at Corfu if. Greece does not yield to his every demand, adding that Corfu was. for centuries a dependency of Ver.iee. When a politician quotes history he is thinking not of the past but the future. "It is a long time since' I have read an utterance so menacing to European peace." This was said to the correspondent by a member of the foreign corps diplomatique, reputed for his cool sagacity. Signor Mussolini's ill-advised outburst has had at least the advantage of disclosing1 certain aspirations hitherto only dimly suspected in British and French naval circles and among the Little Entente.

The special correspondent of the Daily Express at Athens telegraphs that Colonel Low, an American, who has just returned from Corfu, declares that the ItaJians rehearsed the occupation of Corfu a month before the Janina murders. An Italian cruiser at that time arrived and her commander sought and obtained the prefect's permission to land men for exercise.' They stayed for five days under canvas, the officers studying the roads and landingplaces. "

= The Greek Government awaits the next move in the dispute with restraint. Even the suggestion that the ocr;unation was a long-prepared coup has failed to arouse any considerable anger. There have been no antiItalian demonstrations. The people anxiously await Britain's next step.

_ LONDON/ 'Sept. 5. lne Geneva correspondent of the limes says the French Government's attitude .is uncertain regarding the Corfu incident. The French delegates favour the League of Nations acting Italy s «)le ally consists of ill-defined but easily comprehensible, French uneasiness. To-morrow will show which side France will swing and what becomes of the League and several peace treaties. >. ■■

The Daily Telegraph says that what matters is peace, and not. a diplomatic victory by one side or the other. The League Council may well recommend «!«« Ambassador's Conference to deal i with the Janina murders and the penalties for them, leaving the League to deliberate upon the occupation of Corfu. France favours this course and, it is, understood, for the sake of umty Britain is ready to accept it. It is not the murders which are threatening the peace of Europe, but the occupation, of Corfu. For the i^axrue Council and the Assembly, which are both in' session, not to consider the occupation of such an important stratejnc island, which is dependent upon international guarantees, is quite inconceivable. It is absolutely u^ust to suggest that countries, above a/I Britain, are guilty of showing hostility to Italy, because of a desire to uphold the League covenant. The Westminster Gazette says Britain is taking a wise and honourable \ course m upholding the League of Nations -ight to intervene in the Graecoltahan crisis to seek a just settlement and avoid a breach of peace. No kind of friendliness or support for the alleged criminal is involved in suggesting that he be fairly tried before punished, and that the prosecutor shall not immediately arrogate to himself the functions of judge, jury and executioner. The small. Powers unanimously regard this as a test case and are hoping the League will survive it triumphantly. This is not because it is dominated by Britain, but because their supreme interest is that the pact insuring the peace of Europe should be strengthened and not proved worthless. ■p. c corresponderfW>f the Daily Express says;. "A high,ltalian authority assured me again to-day that Italy will leave the League father than allow the League to interfere. In that event Greece will lose Corfu for ever He said: "The only drawback is that our relations with Britain might be strained; we do not fear the Balkan States." .

__ . ROME, Sept. 5. Official: Signor Mussolini will not only preside at the opening of the international grand prix at Milan on. Sunday, but will himself drive a racing motor car a complete circuit of a hundred miles. He informed the committee that he desired to be the first to test the course. He will leave Rome on Friday evening and drive to Milan by the new route, which he will choose himself.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/HNS19230907.2.22

Bibliographic details

CORFU INCIDENT, Hawera & Normanby Star, Volume XLII, Issue XLII, 7 September 1923

Word Count
776

CORFU INCIDENT Hawera & Normanby Star, Volume XLII, Issue XLII, 7 September 1923

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