Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

The War.

Peb Press Association — Bx Electmc Telegraph. —Copyright. Capetown, January lv!. Lord Methuen's upper pon'oon bridge over the Modeler River is nearly completed. London, January 12. Lord Hopetoun, PaymasterGeneral, and a former Governor of Victoria, has placed a wing of tlopetoun House, his family seat in Scotland, to the use of Scottish soldiers i wounded in the war. The Queen has contributed two pictures to the Artists' War Fund, one from her own hand, the other by the late Prince Consort. The Hon. Thomas Brassey, son of Lord Brassey, Governor of Victoria, is raising and will accompany a Yeomanry Corps for South Africa Sydney, January 13. The correspondent of the Herald gays rumors are rife with regard to the needless manner in which "Tommy Atkins" has been sacrificed in variou3 battles, He also mentions that it is a matter of common talk among ;t the colonists that Imperial officers will never take tbs advice of reliable colonial scouts. They employ natives or doubtful Europeans, or ignore both, and go in on their ' own account. Sydney, January 13. The second contingent is now complete. Adelaide, January 12. The uewspaper shilling war fund now amounts to over 50,000 shillings. THE KILLED AND WOUNDED AT LADYSMITH.

AN AUSTRALIAN DOCTOR WOUNDED.

135 KILLED AND 244 WOUNDED.

Received January 14, 6.15 p.m.

London, January 18.

An official list has been received of those killed and wounded last Saturday in ths battle at Lady smith.

I'ifteeu officers were killed, including the Earl of Ava, eldest son of the Marquis of Dufttrin, Colonel Diok-Cunyngham, of the Gordon Highlanders, who was previously wounded at Elands Laagte ; Captain H. S. Cowan, of the King's Koyal Rifles ; Cat tain Digby Mack worth, of the 2cd Battalion of the Surrey Regiment ; Captain Miller Watnutt, of the Ist Battalion of the Gordon Highlanders. Twenty-five officers were wounded, including Earrie Davies, of Jameson Raid fame, and Major in the Imperial Light Horse, which he was instrumental in raising ; and Dr Hornabrook, an Australian, who at Elands Laagte secured, single handed, the surrender of 40 Boars. One hundred and thirty-five men were killed and 244 wounded. Durban, January 13. Potgieter's Drift, north of the Zwarfcskop bridge, which General Builer seized on 'Ahuraday, consists of a ferry boat worked by a wire. The country northwards from the Drift is open, and suitable for military operations. The Ladysmith cavalry, ia a drenching ruin, destroyed a bridge over. the river near Inhlawe, thus isolating the Boers. THE SORTIE FROM MAFEKING. Received January 14, 6.15 p.m. London, January 18. Later details of the sortie from Mafeking on December 26 show that Captain Vernon and Lieutenant Patton were killed whilst firing their revolvers with their fists through loopholes in the enemy's fort. UNIONIST PRESS ASSAILS THE GOVERNMENT. AND STRONGLY URGES ITS DISMISSAL. PARLIAMENT WILL MEET ON 30th. BOER ARMY TOTALS 80,000. GERMANY AND GUNS FOR BOERS. Received January 15, 1.15 a.m. London, January 14. All the Unionist newspapers continue to assail the Government. The hostile criticisms have increased since General Sir William Butler (late Commandant at the Cape) advised the use of 120,000 troops. Parliament has been summoned for the 30th. ' j The Morning Post demands the ; dismissal of the Government, aud j alleges that the military preparations were determiued by the Cabinet's own views of the political situation. Capetown, January 13. The Jbree Staters have commandeered a number of Englishmen. Many fled to Basutoland. London, January 13. Signor Kuggieri, the well-kn. wn African traveller, states that the Boer army numbers 80,000, and that the goldfijlds have been mined against attack. Bkelin, January 13. Germany has requested Krupps, gun manufacturers, to cease supplying guns to the belligerents. Received January 14, 6.15 a.m Ottawa, January 13. Sir Wilfrid Laurier, Premier of Canada, speaking at Shorbrook, Quebec, said the volunteer movement, sprang from the spontaneous will of the population. The colonies voluntarily sto d behind the Motherland. If the Transvaal had granted the settlers religious and political libei by similar to that which existed in Canada the war would never have occurred. DEPARTURE OF BRITISH VOLUNTEERS. AH ENTHUSIASTIC SEND-OFF. MEN CARRIED SHOULDER HIGH. Received January 14, 6.15 p.m. London, January 13. Prior to their departure, the 500 volunteers raised by the Lord Mayor of London were accorded the Freedom of the Guild Hall, and attended St. Paul's Cathedral and the Benchers' supper at the Inner Temple. The crowds carried them shoulder high. The Prince of Wales sent a message wishing them " God speed." They Bail for Sjuth Afric.t to day. Melbouuke, January 14. Lord Brassey cabled £1000 towards the cost of the Yoomanry corps whioh his son ia organising in England. London, January 14. The Btreets were packed at dawu to witness the departure of '^

volunteers. All the windows along 1 the railway to Southampton were 1 dressed with Union Jacks The ; Lord Mayor and the sheriffs of the ' city took a farewell of the men \ aboard the vessel '

ATTEMPT TO FIRE A TROOP- 1 SHIP. I

Received January 13, 6.30 p.m. Brisbane, January 13. A sensational attempt has been made to set fire to the troopship Maori King, at the South Brisbane wharf. The fire was discovered at the edge of the coal bunkers, a little distance from which was found a drum ' full of tar. Two holes were perforated in the bottom, allowing the tar to doze out in the direction of the coal. The fire was quickly extinguished Since the vessel arrived, a detec- } tive has been watching, as two or three foreigners were seen about the vossel several times. It is rumored that two arrests will be made before the vessel sails. Beceived January 14, 6.15 p.m. Sydney. January 14. In view of the attempt to fire the Maori King at Brisbane, special precautions have boen takeu to guard the troopships in Sydney. It is understood the police have several suspicious foreigners under surveillance. Received January 13, 6.30 p.m. Hobart, January 14. The Premier has wired to Mr Lyne that he cannot raise sufficient good shots to go to the Transvaal as a separate corps, and asking if he will enrol those willing; to volunteer in the New South Wales bushmen's contingent.

DEPARTURE OF VICTORIAN AND

QUEENSLAND CONTINGENTS.

Received January 14, 6.15 p.m.

Melbourne, January 14

; The city was thronged yesterday to witness the departure of the second contingent and bid farewell to the Brasseys, who left for Eng land in their yacht Sunbeam. The troops marched from Government House, where patriotic addresses were delivered by the Governor and the Premier. The entire route was packed by cheering crowds. Major I Price, Commandant of the contingent, received a specially enthusiastic reception. Brisbane, January 14. 1 The second contingent embarked ' on the Maori King yesterday afternoon. The Lieut-Governor farewelled them in a patriotic speech. There was a repetition of the enthusiasm at the first contingent's departure, thousands crowding the streets and wharf. GENEKAL FRENCH ON THE ENEMY'S EASTERN FLANK. THE NECESSITY FOP. MOBILE TROOPS. 'the probability of euro, pean intervention. a handsome offer. Received January 15, 9 a.m. Capetown, January 14. Major - Geueral French is now strongly encamped on the enemy's flank. The invaders endeavored to oust the British from their position, but the attempt was vigorously resisted, and proved unsuccessful. The manner in which the Suffolks met with the disaster near Colesberg has convinced the colonial troops that mounted regulars ought to be utilised to cope with the Boer forces in hilly country, and that the infantry ought to be restricted to fighting on the plains Mr Hoffmann, member of the ■ Cape Leg'slative Assembly for I De« ar, will probabiy be court- - for acting on the meJical . staff of the Boer army. London, January 14. The Spectator urges doubling the shifts of men employed in every arsenal and dockyard ; also the placing of contracts for warlike stores at Home and abroad. It further advooates the streng'hening of the reserves of engineers and officers and men of the navy, and urges that these precautions necasaary with a view to averting pressure of European intervention in the Transvaal a few months hence; The ofier (f Lord Strathcona, I High Commissioner of Canada, to equip and maintain, at a cost of a million dollars, 400 north -western ; C madian rough riders for active service has been accepted by the i Imperial authorities. j Wellington, January 14. i The sieging of "The AbsentMinded Beggar " by Mr Wallace Brownlow during the performance of "A Trip to Chinatown" is nightly received with great enthusiasm, and at its conclusion there is a perfect hail of silver, the amount being handed over to the Patriotic Fund. Dunedin, January 14. A heavy downpour of rain marred the Aquatic Carnival in aid of the Patriotic Fund. Despite the bad weather, about 2000 braved the elements on the wharves. OUR SECOND CONTINGENT. Wellington, January 14. Tho announcement that our contingent would be engaged in a shamfight with the local volunteers attracted thousands to Newtown Park on Saturday. The day's work is considered to have been of great benefit to those who are going into aotive warfare. Eventually tho Commandant (the unipira) declared the battle drawn.

On Sunday morning, Bishop Wallis held a church service. in the camp. Five huudred local volunteers marched out, and it is estimated that 10,000 of the public attended. Amongst those present were His Excellency the Governor, Hons X J. Seddon, J. G. Ward, and J. Carroll, and the Hon G. H. Reid (ex-Premier of New South Wales). The collections amounted to £75 for the Patriotic Fund.

In the afternoon the oamp was again viewed by several thousands. Everything is ready for the departure of the men on the 20th inst., but again the site of the demonstration has been changed. It is said that owing to the expected crowd it will be impossible to march the men fiom the camp at Newtown to the town ; bence the former decision to have a demonstration in Newtown Park has been cancelled.

Wblmngton, January 15.

The officers of the Aotea, which arrived from London last night, state that 5s each was received at Hobart for single copies of Cape papers. Mr Wilford, M.H.R , will act as marshal for the demonstration on

the contingent's departure. The speeches on this occasion will be limited to five minutes each. The Government will be asked to man the forts and salute the Waiwera as she departs.

THE NEW ZEALAND MEN AT THE FRONT.

THE SKIRMISH AT ARUNDEL.

WHEN THE NEW ZEALAND

MAIL ARRIVED.

Wellington, January 15. The Press Association special with the New Zealand contingent writes :— Arundbl, December 14. — We have hardly had a moment's rest till to-day, when we got our much-needed day off. On the 7th, we were ordered by General French to march to Hartebeeste Fontein, fifteen miles from Naauwpoort, and, if no resistance was offered, we were to occupy a line of kopjes there, and cover the detraining of the sth Dragoon Guards and Carabineers.

No. 1 Company morched by the railway line to see that it was not tampered with, and No. 2 Company escorted the wagons along the road. Nothing happened on the way, and as soon as our arrival was telegraphed to Naauwpoort the carabineers and mounted infantry came on by train. The former, 500 strong, were soon sweeping over the veldt, and Arundel was seized with little difficulty, as the Boers cleared out on their approach.

The Boer adjutant was out shooting, and, .after a few harmless shots, was captured.

We heard the firing, and it put us more than ever on the gui vive. As dusk came on, our Cossacks outposts were drawn in and strengthened. This is a party of four mounted men posted in a commanding position, from which the enemy can be observed. That night we slept in our great coats — our first experience of a atony bed in the open air.

Next morning a kaffir, who had deserted from the Boers, informed us that the railway line was broken a few miles on our side of Arundel, and we were ordered to cover the arrival of the train to repair it. 1 his done, we pushed on through Arundel, a beautiful little place, and joined the Carabineers five miles beyond, at a line of kopjes supposed to be held by the enemy.

Colonel Porter ordered us to support the Carabineers, and we remained about 1000 yds behind.

Firing began on both flanks, but not in front. The cavalry spread out right and left, and we were ordered to occupy the kopjes directly in front.

Scrambling up, we could see the Boers, mostly two miles away, but some occupied a small detached kopje about 1200 yds away. On these we opened fire. Two of their horses were killed, and three men were believed to be killed or severely wounded. Their return fire was harmless.

The cavalry, who met both artillery and rifle fire, had one or two horses wounded.

The New South Wales Lancers, on the left, also received a hot fire, and galloped in again.

At dark we retired to Arundel, and bivouacked, with orders to move again at 3 a.m.

We were roused at 1 a.m., in inky darkness, and with great difficulty were ready at the rendezvous by the appointed time. The intention was to make a feigned attac.i at dawn and make the enemy disclose thek position and force, but the New South Wales Lancers did not turn up for an hour, and the scheme had to be abandoned. I have not heard the reason of their delay.

Nothing was done that day, but our tents and fresh meat and bread arrived. The first mail from New Zealand also reached us, and there was a dead silence in camp for a short time after the letters had been delivered. Next day (Sunday) was also an idle day, with two heavy thunderstorms, which flooded out the tents and drenched everything.

A LITTLE BATTLE.

On Monday, 11th, from the top of a kopje, we saw a miniature battle. Forty or fifty Boers had occupied a farm about four miles away, whioh had to be cleared suddenly. We saw two guns of the Horse Artillery and some cavalry galloping hard across the veldt towards the farm. The Boers, observing them, rushed out, and at once made for a kopje a few hundred yards in the rear. They were, however, not quite smart enough, as the guns, like lightning, came into position, and two well-placed shells at 2000 yards range killed one Boer and wounded seven others. The remainder reached the kopje safely, and then cleared right away.

Before dawn on the 10th, with the New South Wales Lancers, the New Zealanders started to reconnoitre the right flank and back of the Boer position, the intention being to observe the position, and come in and report.

The Lancers led, but somehow did not take a correct route, and at dawn we found we were making for a strong Boer position. Our course was changed and then we found ourselves nearly buck in camp, and in imminent danger of being fired at by our own pickets.

We were then ordered to make the same reconnaissance by daylight, and proceeded out. Presently we got under fire from an invisible enemy, and withdrew. A few Boers were seen galloping across to seize a kopje in front of us, and before the order came for us to withdraw out of danger the Boer bullets wero whistling all round, but mercifully no one was hit.

Trooper Harris' horso was shot through the leg, and one of the Lancers' horses was hit.

Orders came to remain about where we were, and make demonstrations on the Boer flank, while some guns and cavalry would be sent round to the far flank, with a view of carrying the required reconnaissance.

In attempting this the cavalry came under a hot fire, and one sergeant was killed and one corporal.

As the day wore on, we gradually advanced on our side of the Boer flank, being unaware what was going on on the other flank, beyond noaring the firing. One of the companies and the Lancers were then detached to make a further demonstration, after which we returned to camp.

AN ALARM.

On the 13th an alarm was Bounded, and wo rushed to our defence position, the cause of the alarm being that the Boers were attempting to seize the railway. The cavalry were flying about the plain and guns wore banging away for several hours.

The New Zealanders watched the scene from the heights. The Boers wero unsuccessful, but could not be induced to leave the kopjes to give the cavalry a ohanco. Desultory firing coutiuued, and all of our squadron of cavalry got under a hot fire, and had half a dozen men wounded.

TO THE RESCUE.

At 8 p.m. the order caino for the New Zealanders to be sent away to Vualskop, seven miles distant, where it was reported a squadron of cavalry and two guns were being pressed. No. 2 Company was sent, and reached the spot without misadventure, when it was found that, though partially surrounded, the men were safe.

The offioer in command then wanted a farm ocoupied by some 80 or 40 Boers cleared, the New Zealanders being required to watch the left flank of the farm.

The cavalry and New Zealanders screeDed two guns until within 2000 yards from the farm, when the mass of galloping horses was suddenly transformed into a stationary mass, the guns blazing away in front.

The New Zealanders swept on, bearing away from the guns, until 1000 yards from the farm. They then dismounted behind a wall, waiting A chance at the Boers.

In a few minutes the order came for them to seize the farm, and, remounting, they cleared the wall, riding on quietly till within 400 or 500 yards, when they urged on their horses to their utmost speed, and, shouting their war cry, " Ake ! Ake !" etc., enveloped the two Bides of the farm.

Momentarily expecting a volley, they reached the outer encircling wall in safety, and then dismounted, fixed bayonets, and cbarged the place. But to their bitter disappointment they found it empty. The farm had apparently been evacuated just prior to the shelling.

After a short respite, we returned to Vaalskop, where we were complimented on the way we had taken the farm.

DEARTH OF NEWS.

Here we get still less news of the progress of the war than we did at the other places, many of the corps being unaware of oar plans until a short time before moving.

All the New Zealanders have note rejoined from De Aar, and we have none on the sick list except a few minor ailments.

We expect to remain here until a general advance on Colesberg is made.

WHEN THE SHELL BUBST.

A GIBL'S THBILLING EXPEBIINOfiS.

A friend, writing from Ladysmith on October 30 to Miss Edith Button, of Melbourne, who is at Maritzburg, tells the following thrilling narrative : -

Early on Thursday morning a party of us went out to one of the hills to view, the firing. It didn't last very long; so about 8 o'clock we made our way back home. Just after breakfast another shell came from Long Tom (the name they gave the 40-pounder). It landed just over on the other side of our paddock. I saw some of the soldiers running to see where it struck, so I started, too, to run over and get a piece of the shell as a memento. No sooner said than done. Off I scampered, and I chummed up with the first soldier I met, and he said, " Come along with me, and I will warn you in time to deaf off before another shell comes"; but almost as he spoke another soldier yelled out, " Look out, here is another 1" And before we had time to think the awful booming and shrieking came, and I wish you could have seen your poor friend then. I juat shut my eyeß tight, and clung like grim death to a barbed wire fence, and whispered, " Good God 1" It exploded about 20ft away— perhaps not so muoh — and the earth just shook under me, and my legs felt as if Ihey had, been shot all over. The last thing I saw as I shut my eyes were men rolling on the ground and running away in all directions. Fear lent them wings, but was not so kind to me, and before I recovered I was knocked over by a mule, which seemed thoroughly to bring me to my senses again. I wanted to find a piece of that shell or die in the attempt. I found. three pieces, and then fled home. However I carried them I can't think now, as they were awfully heavy ; but at the time they felt as light as feathers. To-day I find I have a big bruise and a slight wound on my leg and a hole in my stocking, and so I have come to the conclusion that I got shot, especially, too, as my legs tingled for hours afterwards.

When I arrived home, I got such a wigging. The family had witnessed it from the verandah, and a lot of soldiers and carbineers from the road. I smelt all over of the Bhell stuff, and, of course,, the shell was quite ho> when I got it. Everything is topsy-turvy again, and we have all had to clear onoe more, as Long Tom is getting too obstreperous. Fanoy me careering about with my hair down, aud fringe in pins (as the fright had taken all the curl out of it), and they said I was white to the gums. Somehow you don't care how you look in war time. Good-bye, as one of the carbineers has just corffc to have tome tape sown on his putties.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/HNS19000115.2.8

Bibliographic details

The War., Hawera & Normanby Star, Volume XXXVX, Issue 5088, 15 January 1900

Word Count
3,650

The War. Hawera & Normanby Star, Volume XXXVX, Issue 5088, 15 January 1900

Working