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Pollard's Opera Company.

— ♦ THE GAY PARISIENNE. " A musical comedy in two acts — lyrics by G. Dance, musio by Ivan Caryll"— such is the description of the new piece which Mr Pollard's clever company will inaugurate the season with oq Monday next. During the last few years this style of piece has come into such favor with amusement-seekers that it has almost supplemented comic opera. To pick up a late number of the London Era or Stage, and read the list of musical comedies on tour in the English provinces, and being played in London theatres, is quite a revelation. The reason for the popularity of these pieces is not far to seek. Bright musio, graceful dancing, witty dialogue, and amusing situations, which cause in* cessant laughter, is what the modern playgoer requires, and in such pieces as "TheGny Parisienne" we have them to repletion. Heavy drama, with its intricate plots and weird sensations, are not in demand with the fin-desiecle iheatre-goer. If asked the reason, the answer would probably be: "Oh. I've got enough trouble at home without going to a theatre for it." Laughter is the keynote of success in modern theatrical produotions, and in "The Gay Parisienne," judging by Australian critics, there is two anjtl a half hours of continuous merriment. There are some twenty musical members in the piece, and Beveral dances and ballets. The oast is a very large one, and includes all the old favorites, besides introducing Miss Gertie Oampain, who | will be seen in the title rdle. The • style of characters will be entirely new ; to the company, and will further show . the versatility of Mr Pollard's olever young people.

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Pollard's Opera Company. Hawera & Normanby Star, Volume XXXV, Issue 4035, 10 September 1898

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