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NEWS AND NOTES.

On her last trip the Zealandia ran from Auckland to Sydney in 3 days and 22 hours.

No fewer than G3 petitions have been presented to the House in favor of local option extension. Regarding these, the petitions committee report that the subject matter being before the House, they have no recommendation to make.

Some workmen, while engaged renovating one of the rooms at Maxwell's Hawera hotel yesterday, came across a quantity of jewellery and money between the partitions. The find consisted of a goZd ring and pin, a half sovereign, and several silver coins. The articles appeared to have been lost for some time.

It is reported that applications for the appointment of a teacher at the Okaiawa school will shortly be considered at the Wanganui Education Board. No public intimation of any such appointment has yet been made, and consequently persons living within the district who might desire to apply for the post have been hitherto debarred from doing so. We understand that it is quite likely that a suitable person would apply if applications were invited, and the committee would do well to communicate with the board on the subject.

The following novel announcement appears in a country journal : — "At Whangarei, on the 19th instant, for the third and last time, the wife of Mr. John Low, of a daughter." A petition is being numerously signed at Te Awamutu praying tlie Government not to dismiss Mr. Northcroft, R.M., whose removal had been petitioned for by some of the Waikato people. " Yes," said the wood dealer, " I prefer to sell wood to men who do their own sawing. You can't convince a man who has worked all day at a wood pile that there isn't a full coid in it. Mr. Macandrew has a motion before the House that a free copy of Hansard should, on application, be sent to every householder who is a registered elector, saying that the cost would not exceed £3000 for the session. Major Atkinson, the other day, said there was great depression in certain centres, notably at Oa.nan.;. He was not surprised that the member for Oamaru (Mr. Shrimski) looked dismal when the local rates of that town amounted to 4s 3d in the £. In the course of certain excavations at Maidens, near Girvan, in Ayrshire, the workmen recently discovered five bronze I axes, in good preservation. They are graduated in size, and were found with j their flat sides against each other beneath the gravel, next the surface of the vock. Father Carew has announced that it is ' intended to found a Catholic University for New Zealand at Wellington. The site for the building has been secured, and the tcacaers are shortly expected from Europe. Wellington will be the Catholic centre of New Zealand. At Messrs. Nolan, Tonks, and Co.'s usual monthly stock sale at Manaia yesterday bidding was slack, and only one or two pens sold at the hammer. All the stock advertised came forward, and there was a fair attendance at the sale. One peu of two j'ear old mixed cattle fetched £2 14s Gd. Milch cows to calve early sold for £Q each. In an English school recently, the following definitions of " customs duties " were given :—": — " ' Customs are ways, duties are things that we have to do, and we ought to do them' (from a girl). 'Customers' duties are to go in the places and buy what they want, not stopping about, but go out when they are done ' (from a boy)." With regard to the finish for the Derby I may say (says Robin Hood) that Webb quite thought he had won with Highland Chief, and that Wood was of the same opinion, and this notwithstanding that the judge gave it a neck in favor of St. Blaise. As a proof that Wood thought he had been beaten, he told the mounted policeman who came to escort him back to scale that that official had made an error, for Webb had won. Mr. Shrimski, M.H.R., gave a sneer at Canterbury the other day. He said :—: — " A document which is in print shows that, out of £30,000 expended on charitable aid last year, Canterbury received no less than .£13,000, and Otago only £3070. Canterbury boasts of an aristocracy too. I do not mind giving them what they need and deserve, but when they turn Youvvd aM say that Carvtevbuvy is to take over Ofcago, I as an Otago man, must object*." The minds o£ members are at present a good deal exercised as to the probable duration of the session. Before the Atkinson - Dargaville episode, strong hopes were cherished that Members might be able to leave for home by the end of this month, but, that incident has stirred up a bitter feeling on both sides, and it is now doubtful whether the session "will end before the middle of September. Prof. Colin, the distinguished German miorosoopist, has receyit)y published his reasons for believing that the use of slates by school children tends to produce shortsightedness. He therefore recommends either pen and ink, or, still better, an artificial white slate, with a black pencil. The use of the latter has already commenced in some of the German schools, and the School Board of Zurich has forbidden the use of the old-fashioned slates after the end of the present term. Ocuiists everywhere are recommending the use of white boards and black chalks, instead of the antiquated black board and white chalk, as not only better for the eyes, but capable of rendering the objects inscribed upon them more plainly visible at a greater distance. The Patca Borough Council has voted -l'so towards the hospital. In supporting the vote, Councillor Taplin is reported by tho Mail to have said that "he would liko to see some humane doctors imported into the place after what he had been told that day. The young man who broke his leg at Odgers' was lying iv his bed groaning all the night, and a bushman who was in towu could bear it no longer, so be went to a certain doctor with his hands full of notes, but this doctor said " Go to Croft," and here was the poor wretch suffering agony because he could get no doctor to attend him." How can Hawera be expected to send patients to that hospital when such things as these are reported of the Patea doctors ? Vast improvements contiuue to be made in regard to the speed of oceangoing steamers. Two new Atlantic steamers, the City of Rome and the Aurania, have just been tested almost simultaneously, and both have attained precisely the same maximum specd — viz., 18if knots, or 21 i miles an hour. The city of Rome measures 8400 tons gross, and her engines indicate 12,000horse power. The Aurania is 7500 tons, ! and her engines indicate 10,000-horse power. Tho latter vessel is the broadest ship in the Atlantic trade, having no less than 57ft. beam to a length of 470 ft. and a depth of 3Sft. 6in. These ships, together with the Arizona, the Alaska, and Oregon, all employed in the same trade, and the steam tea-clipper Stirling Castle, have inaugurated a new era in ocean steaming. In moving the second reading of the i Waitara Harbor Loan Bill, as reported in Hansard, Colonel Trimble referred to the Press Association telegram about the grounding of the Macgregor, and said that there was animus in it, and he would prove in committee, if challenged to d*o so, that there was no foundation whatever for the statement. He had telegraphed to the harbormaster at AVaitara asking for information, and the following was the reply : " Macgregor, on going out yesterday, took the ground on the riverbauk, iuside the bar. Was floated off last night and came to wharf this morning. No damage whatever. — J. Camsron, harbormaster." It would be seen from that that she took the ground on the riverbank, and not on tho bar. It appears to us, however, that there has been too much imputing of anivins and misrepresentation i about this matter. No one at Waiiara took the trouble to telegraph particulars of the mishap and give the true facts, and the consequence was that the New Plymouth agent of the Press Association had to gather his information from the best sources he could. To blame him under such circumstances for stating that the boat grounded on the bar instead of on the riverbank, is childish, for although the report turns out to have been exaggerated, it was in all probability a failstatement .of the information obtained, and it is the Waitara people who are to blame for not seudiug the true details of the mishap.

There was a good attendance of buyers at Messrs Nolan, Tonks, and Co.'s tree sale to-day. Prices for the better known varieties of trees were well sustained, and bidding generally was brisk. It is stated that at the latest date the demand for Mr. Gladstone's speech on the Affirmation Bill was so great thatthe Liberal Central Association has decided to issue an edition of 100,000 copies. It is proposed to exchange Mr. Duffy, the present stationmaster at Turakina, to Manutahi ; but that gentleman objects to being removed, and a petition is being got up to have him retained at his present post. We notice that one of the lady saloon passengers by the Catalonia, which arrived in Wellington on 30th July, has settled down in Hawera as the wife of one of the settlers here. " Happy the wooing that's j not long a doing." A meeting of the Hawera Masonic Lodge, No. 652, S.C., was held at the Temple last night, the R.W.M., Bro. Ferguson, presiding. The business consisted of initiating, and passing, and was gone through satisfactorily. A good story comes from the Napier hospital. One of the servants was discharged by the matron, and entertaining a feeling of irritation at her dismissal, she interviewed the secretary, and, on being told that it was no part of his business, she wild, " Oh I well I shall go and speak to Dr. Spencer, and then you will see some letters in the papers !" It is gratifying to note that the only two competitors from Hawera for the Wanganui scholarship examinations — George Home and James McFarland — headed the list in their respective classes, the former obtaining 568 marks out of a possible 690, and the latter 511 out of the same number. Such a result is evidence of careful teaching, and of great intelligence in the lads. There were 24 competitors. We are informed that a corner section in Wilson street, opposite Mr. Partridge's, has been sold to Mr. Maunder, who proposes to build there shortly ; the property belonged to Mr. J. Perry. Two acres adjoining the above have been sold, through Mr. Furlong, to Mr. Goodwin, on behalf of Mr. J. Stevenson. The prices have not transpired, but sellers appear quite satisfied with their transactions. Great alterations and improvements are being made at the Hawera hotel, the bedrooms, sitting, and and dining rooms are being re-papered and re-furnished, and when the renovations are completed the hotel will be greatly improved in appearance, and will be able to offer much greater comfort to visitors and boarders. Mr. P. Maxwell, late of Okaiawa, is now the proprietor, and appears to be sparing no expense to make the house a most comfortable one. A member of the House has drawn attention to the curt letter sent by an officer of a land board in response to a request for the issue of a Crown grant. The letter ran : " The Land Board decline to issue a Crown grant." He thought that officials should not be allowed to snub the public in that manner, and that the official referred to might hare given some indications of the Board's reason for refusing the issue of a grant. He thought that officials, " clothed with a little "briei authority," should treat the public with respect. Of deferred-payment settlers in Southland, no fewer than 395 are in arrears •with their rents, their agregate indebtedness being £5451. The Land Board has notified defaulters that arrears must be paid in one month, failing which the land is to be forfeited. The largeness of the arrears is attributed to the fact that settlers cannot find a remunerative market for oats. The Board also resolved that the residence clause of the Land Act shall for the future be more strictly enforced in the case of deferredpayment selectors, it having become known that several cases of dummyisni have occured. The Saturday Eeview says of the England of to-day : — What a frightful pictuie might be drawn, and without the least exaggeration, of the things that go on daily in our streets ; the millions of men who never open their mouths without an oath, and never utter a single noun substantive without prefixing one and the same ugly and meaningless adjective ; the shameless vice which hides not its head even at high noon ; the Embankment, where men are nightly set upon, robbed, and thrown into the river ; the gambling clubs ; the suburban races ; the courts, into which no decent person may venture by day or night ; the music halls and their senseless and mischievous songs ; the drinking ; the wife-beating ; the starvation. Were all these things written down a picture might be produced which would make the London of Victoria compare with the Borne of Nero. " iEgles," in the Australasian, writes : " Looking on calmly from afar (mentally) one can reckon up pretty accurately that the gush for annexation will cool down presently. It is all lovely, and joyous, | and serene, until the time comes for paying the piper. Then those who have been dancing will begin to count the cost of the music. A General Australasian Protectorate — a kind of joint-stock kingship of the Cannibal Islands — is a rosy | proposal, but just wait until some one has to adjust the contribution of each of the governing powers. Won't there be a snatching Tip of marbles, and a crying out of 'I won't play anymore!' This narrow jealousy — the dread of paying twopence more than one's share — has done more to keep the colonies apart than anything else, Indeed, the first symptom of give-and-take was displayed in the conclusion of the Postal Union Conference. But despite the cheerinsr sign, economic Parliaments will so wrangle over the contribution clauses that the idea of a joint Government of detached islands is very remote and shadowy." In discussion on the Destitute Persons Bill, hon. Mr. Minzies gave notice of his intention to move to insert the following clause :—": — " Seduction of a female, fully proved, should involve the male in a heavy fine, payable to the public treasury in trust for the mother and child, the child's portion to be retained until the risk of its becomiug chargeable be removed hy the mother's marriage or otherwise." He said that men and women who where the parents of illegitimate children were treated very differently by the world. The man, though his morals might be bad, was not punished by society — the world generally still smiled on him ; whereas in the case of the woman the world cast endless stones at her, and afforded her no opportunity whereby she might regain her place in the ranks of honest society. It seemed to him that this was very unjust. As a general rule he thought it might be admitted that the man was chiefly to blame — in a few cases it might be otherwise. But the man was lictle blamed, and the disgrace and suffering fell upon the woman.

Reward offered for two lost horses.

Builders are invited to tender.

Armand Delainalle publishes notice of application to transfer the license of the Eoyal Hotel. Messrs. Gardner and Sutton announce further reductions in prices. Mr. Cowern publishes important notice of sale, on Saturday (to-morrow) of paperhanging, Ecrim, glass, etc., in estate of W. Dixon. Notice of application to transfer publican's license to P. Maxwell is given by the trustees in Boskruge's estate.

A very bad case of highway robbery, tried several years ago before Chief Baron Greene on tbe last day of the Ennis Assizes, in Ireland, resulted in an acquittal. The Chief Baron was resolved to give the Clare jury a rub for their verdict. So addressing tbe Sheriff, he said, " Mr. Sheriff, is there any other indictment against this innocent man ?" " No, my lord," was the reply. " Then you'll greatly oblige me if you don't let him out until I have half-an-hour's start of him on my way to Limerick," said the Chief Baron. A notable decision uuder the Married Women's Property Act, passed in i England last session, has just been given by the Licensing Justices at tbe Guldhall, The Hope public-house was transferred to Mrs. Helena, Maude Meaden, [ notwithstanding the fact that she is and was at the time of the transfer a married lady. Mrs. Meaden informed tbe magistrates that she intended to carry on the business quite apart from her husband, who is a traveller, although he was living with her, and would colne to sleep on the premises The credentials of Mrs. Meaden being satisfactory, the Bench decided that under the new Act they could legally make the transfer, and tbei'efore Mrs. Meaden becomes landlady of tbe Hope in her own right, and Mr. Meaden is — a honafide traveller.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/HNS18830810.2.7

Bibliographic details

NEWS AND NOTES., Hawera & Normanby Star, Volume IV, Issue 569, 10 August 1883

Word Count
2,904

NEWS AND NOTES. Hawera & Normanby Star, Volume IV, Issue 569, 10 August 1883

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