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FURTHER PARTICULATRS.

- t The average Indivldui?, cnnsjly oitlinj OJa town by hifl fire, ha* nob fctw f Jilntes conception of the actual misery and deatl tutlon that h,\g been cansed at Cliva bj the Hood waloro. Tho damage embraces [ auoh a large urea of conubry that it will bo weeks bofoto the condition of the » ilooded-out poopla cnn bo realised. Ac j tho present time they simply stand aghast ! : at the misfortune which has overtaken , liheru. Tho nconc, as viewed yesteidoy, ■ woo pitiable In tUo extreme. After negotiating the two extensive waah-onts as Waitaagi, V7hioh ia nob done without the Ersatoeti diflicnlty, for tho servloe of transference ab preoaufc 1b very primitive, tho spectator ia bronghb in view of poesibly ono of tho rnonb disantroun cfTeots of tho (land. Mr L'rondbeut's residence la renting on a few bluoko. Tho bos made a terrific sweep of hia paddock, washing b great portion of the land olean away. In the woolshed there nre marks Bhowing that tha water rose to about rive feet from the flooring, which will give a fairly good Idea of what height tho water rnuab havo reached. Hera the pictnro la ft sad ono indeed, for the wholo place is simply a wreck, and totally tinfiG for futnro habitation. Enquiries instituted ati Clive yostßrday by a Herald reportor elicited the information that Mr Broadbenb, sen,, who resided In a small whars at the roar of a larger residence, was asked to leave his position in order to occupy n point of greater safety, but he shouted back that he preferred to remain where he was. Shortly after the sea swept over the place, and must have carried the whare and Mr Broadbent out Into the ocean, for not a vestige of tho whare or of Mr Broadbent has been eeen since. TFTE FURY OK THE WATERS, Pen can hardly give n description nde« nato enongh to convey to anyone who has not seen the position at Waltangio true plcfnra of tho Btate of affairs there. The waters in their fury simply played n tho railway line, Bad after the embankment, extending ovor a great area, had been washed away the rails and Bleepers seemed to have been lifted bodily into an upright position, and now for some distance present tbe appearance of having been specially erected there as a kind of fence. Un every aide, where there is not water, silt has been deposited raDglng from a depth of a few Inches to two feet or more. Following the main road, which Is broken up, and with carcases of dead cattle and sheep lying at every point, the Farndon Hotel is reaohed. The water here of course, as elsewhere, has receded, bat what a mess ! Upstairs, In the large room, a number of families are located temporarily until their own houses are put into something like decent order, but It will take weeka to moke tho hotel present Bgain the appearance of anything like its former self. Passing on over the big bridge which noted 68 a haven of refnge for many people on that fatal Friday night, one only begins to see what those with families snffared at West Cllve. TIIEY WANTED BKBAD. " Pleaoo, sir, can you leu mo havo some bread : we've only got one loaf between live of '.is," said an intelligent-looking lad in the hearing of tho writer yesterday afternoon at tho Clive police st-jtior. The boy cama with hia 6lstjnr ; he was barefooted— sha in clothep which wanted chancing. At thin Gbatlon Conß&able Kennedy, too, bwd had a very anxious night. Over two feet of water hud stond ia I the houßo, and it was with difficulty that the inmates escaped. A alcrht down tha m»ln street r.f Olive gives rise to the thought that could the people of New Zealand only reall'e the pilgho Into which tbe naforbnnato luhabltants of Olive have bseu cJRt they would not thick twice about giving timelp assistance. The settlers weie buey yesterday, as they have been since Saturday, eciubblug the slit from their houses. There wag a dead cow in the frnit gßrden of one, with furniture strewn promiscuously about. The ocoupiers hud evidently lost hearb, and had not returned to the Bcene of devastation. Id web i shooklcg scene all through. Tho people are in great want. Some are still in the clothes in which they swam for their lives en Friday ; others arellvlsgon She charity of their neighbors. THE AFTER EFFECT. Up to yesterday very few fitea had been lib ia private houßea at Clive, while Rt Bennett's bakery the proprietor was making strenuous efforts to get a fire started in his oven. The water came right up to the chop counter and Into the bakehonßß, The back-yard Is one mass of silt, to say nothing of the condition of the furniture. At Beck's we found the owner yesterday afternoon viewing tbe surrounding scene from the top window of bin two-story residence. He appeared to wear as.'eenial a countenance as possible in his trouble, but he, too, has fared badly. Acting on past experience he had made provision fur futnre fbods by ralsing the premises to a height which ho thought) do possible flood could reaoh. Yet this proved of no avail, and the ph.ee in simply mined. Tho West Clive Hotel Is crowded with enfferors who have taken refuge there, mostly women and children, who, from tbe balcony, are In a pjeltlon to view their own houses. They tell you thit the experience tbpy went through on Frtdfiy night was enifiolent to last them for a life time. "We novor had the slightest Idea that we were in danger," said one of the women to the writer. "The thing happened so suddenly, and the water came on us with inch a roar and rush that all we could do was to climb on to the tables." There they remained until rescue parties took them off In boats. What they had lost she could not say, and wringing her hands as if la abject misery, said, " The Lord help us ; I don't know what we shall really do now." Bat there were worse cases fhau tbat just described. On all sides the samo "sorrowful story was given — nob stories told for the purpose of trying to elicit sympathy and help, but Btorles which had about them the vJug of truth. H one felt Inollned to be doubtful of the accounts heard, there waa the ecena before him to verify every word, To attempt to get a full list of those who have snffsred is at this stage an impossible task, for they have hardly had time to realise their pooltlon. But we nre afr&irt that when that list is published It will reveal an appalling state of oihlis, BOUND LOWER PAPAKURA. The Sb. Paul's Christian Endeavor Sctlety did acme really practical Christian work yesterday. Qno party went to tha lower Papakura district in a boat, diking with them olothing, bread, and tinned meatß. They visited the bonsPß of MeDßrs Oaster, fingllsh. (Joiliae, Burke, Bulled, young, end Pallijon'o. They did not see Mr Stoddart, hut heard thr.b he had lost 20 head of oattlo. Mr Gooter loat SI cattle and a horoo, Mr English ton head, and all of them something Where the water had receded the. silt waa Been several feet deep. Tho current was still running so strongly that it took the party five hours to pull about a mile above the Meanee bridge. The great want ot all tho so'tlers was dry clothing and bedding, especially the latter. E.\ST CLIVE. Another paviy waat to E=ssb Cllvn with a packborse, carrying food and clothing. Much the same s'ato of things existed thero. Not a family had dry bßddlng, and few dry clothing, A few settlers saved some cattle, Lat tho majority lost all. Dead beasts and oheop were seen In every direction, bub the borees seemed to have made their way to higher ground. THE TAUpO ROAD. Messrs Crowther and M'Csuley'n mall coach, in oharge of Bargesß, left Tanpo as usual on Thursday last, and its nonarrival on Siturday gave rl>e to some uneasiness. Accordingly Mr M'Cauley lefb on Sunday morning for the purpose of riding as far as possible and obtaining Borne Intelligence of the missing vehicle. He got to the Upper Mohaka bridge the samo afternoon, and found that the bridge bad been washed away. However, Mr Ames, the licensee of the Mohaka hotel, came down to the op- ! poßlte bank, and from a conversation with that gentleman Mr M'Cauley learned that the coach was otnok up at Tarawera with eifiht passengers, and was unable to elthe* come on to jNapier or return to Tanpo. This Information had been given to Mr Ames by the lineman from Tarawera, Ib is assumed by Mr M'Cauley that the stoppage has occurred owing to Blips }v the pumice cuttings. We learn that the river ti tlcbrtka reached an onprecedented height, running aji png time fully four feet over the top oi the bridge, The cutting 'at the" approach' 'to ihe kldge on the Napier side has been' washed away, and also the timber thab bad bebu lying near there to repair the bridge from damage sustained In a previous flood. On the' other filde ph2 site formerly occupied by Marshall's garden 2s now a waste, covered with silt, triflf, and all manner of flepru, Mr M'Cauley returned to Po hl jl tbb same evening and osme on to Napier last night. Tha road between Pohnl and Mohaka has not been greatly damaged, but fchere area number ot nllpst, and three culverts have bfien washed away. The county road bßtweon Pohnl and Petane has sneered considerably. There ore slips alt along, culverts have dtanppearcd, and five bildges have been wiiehed away. It will bo some time before the route will be fit for wheel traffic The t-ottlera la the district havo not euflwred any great lobb of stock, bnt foooea have been deBtroved, and there are land slips In all directions. There are only two small breaks in the telegraph line on this side 1 of Mohaka, and tho Taraworu lineman had repaired those on the other Mcle by Sanday. A drove: named John Rojs at ) Glengarry had & narrow eeospoaf Iqelng a I flock of sheep by a land slip, Ho aaw it

I coming, mid got the uheep away, but f strcgglerawere amotheieii,

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/HBH18970420.2.16.1

Bibliographic details

FURTHER PARTICULATRS., Hawke's Bay Herald, Volume XXXII, Issue 10589, 20 April 1897

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FURTHER PARTICULATRS. Hawke's Bay Herald, Volume XXXII, Issue 10589, 20 April 1897

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