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The following is from tho New York World: — Strange to say. the two best ■purti.s in England, the young Kiwi of Dudley and the Duke of Newcastle, add to the attractions they possess fornll rightminded women in the shape of rank and vrealth, the ownership of two of tho most famous and splendid diamonds in the world. Tho Earl of Dudley's is tho well-known Star of South Africa, which was found at tho Cape a number of years ago, and though a little bit off color, is yet so large, brilliant, and iliiwless that it ranks high among the

great gems. It hangs in the front ot the Dudley coronet, destined before a great ■while to crown the fair, jno'ud head of someone of the caste of Vere de Vcre, or mayhap some yet haughtier maid of the caste ot I'onsoiiby de Towkyns from this side of the water.' The diamond that adds

lustre to the Newcastle name is yet more famous, being one of the 24 precious .stones that, are held as the monarchs ninon^' gems. It weighs 45 carats, and is the largest and most perfect of the blue diamonds. Though white, when held in the light, it emits the most superb and dazzling blue rays. It is popularly known as the Hope Diamond, having been the property of an English gentleman of that name, who brought it from India. Its history is surrounded ■with wild traditions of the East, and more than once it has been stained with

blood, lost and recovered, bought and sold, stolen and yielded as ransom. It has gleamed in the gem-crusted turbans of the great. Maharnjahs, hung on the breasts of odalisques, and is said once to have formed the single eye of a great idol. Finally, through peaceable purchase, the Duchess of Newcastle, mother of tho present Duke, secured it for the gum of £30,000, and created a great sensation tho first time she wore it to one of the Queen's drawing-rooms. The Duko is at present in this country, and there is just a bare possibility that some of the season's belles may yet be destined to wear that celestial sjeni. < Almost equally rare and beautiful is a pair of violet diamonds owned hero by a jeweller whoso Russian paintings are well known. He bought them at the sale of Queeii Isabella of Spain's jewels. They are perfectly matched in size, shape and color, and though, like tlio Hope diamond, they ■ire white, yet when moved shoot out lambent violet rays. The Queen was said to have paid £12^000 for tho two.and was ton years in securing a perfect pair.

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TWO FAMOUS DIAMONDS. Hawkes Bay Herald, Volume XXIII, Issue 8036, 25 April 1888

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