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A NOTABLE "TURFITE."

{Licensed Victualler'!' Gazt //<■'.) In the days when we were yonnp; there was scaroely n moro notable personage on the turf than He Dry Pudwick, not only on account of his extensive dealings in tins book-making line, but from tho hind of Machiavellian character he had gained as a moneylender, and above nil, from the part he was supposed to have played in the career of tho unfortunate Marquis of Hastings. Aa a rule your succeasful turlite hails from « very low stratum of society that Iteon instinct which ia elnracleristie: of clever unrdncati-il men buinj,' superior to all acquired culturo in piloting them through tho devious mozen of turf lifeSuch, howovor, wan not the caßo with Honry Padwick, for ulthoujjh his father was only a butcher in tho liltlo Sussex town of Horaham, ho received an esccllout education, and was brought up Ito the legal profession. Being a (/harp, long-headed youth, ho hmj no notion of growing grey in building up a niero comfortable practico ; there wero Hhorter roads to fortune than that open to him, and ho decidod upon tho burest, to ono of his calibre — usury. He took a house in Davis-strret, Berkeley-equaro, furnished it handsomely, engaged a first-class nook, filled his cellar with choice winos ; being a man of polished manners; played the part of a gourmand and liberal host to perfection ; let young spendthrifts and erabarrnssed eldora know that money, as well as dinners, could bo had on tho premiss, and drew the impecunious fliea in swarms about him. 110 was v bold man, too, ;>nd would advance on sccurilios that thu raoro cautious of bio fraternity would not look at ; yet he seldom inado a

mistake, and soon aocured tho largest clientele in London.

Padwick's conneotion with the turf cmiitußnci'd in 1849. It did not prove a promising beginning; ho Shad bought some forty yearlings at a highprico, out of which only ono. a horse mined Prestige — and buo won him only three small races— turned out liny good whatever. Vadwick wna a man whom diflloulties only nerved. If he had failed at first, there was all the more reason ho ohonld succeed at last ; and at every yearling Bale ho wna to he seen, paying such prices as fairly astonished the old handß, and evoked many a prophecy us lo what would'oome of it. For Yellow .Tack and Queen's Head, at i\lr Grovillo's sale, he gave as much as 1000 and 2000 guiuoas respectively; and yellow Jaok was another nnlucky bargain, who . never won a race for his owner. Ho now built splendid stables at Findou, appointed old John Day hia trainer, and once more justified the saying that thn bold man oun conipol Fortune, by starting on a turf career of almost unprecedented success. Many an old sporting man will remember his wonderful filly, Virago, by Pyrr'hus the First out of Virginia ; but, as is very often the cnae, she was not one of hia costly purchases, as ho bought her as a yearling for £300. Aiter running only once as a two-year-old, sho the nest year carried off, on the name day, the City and Suburban and Metropolitan Stakes at Epsom (1854), a feat that hns never beou paralleled, beating in the latter a five-year-old called Muscovite, who that year took the Osarowilch, carrying Sat 31b. At York, Virago won both the Great .Northern and the Flying Dutchman Handicaps, the Ono Thousand Guineas Stakes at Newmarket, the Goodwood Gup aud Nassau Stakes, the : Yorkshire Oaks, tho Warwick and Doncaster Cups, -winning during the Beason ten stakes of the collective value of £9750, beating seventy-ais compotifora, losing only one race- — at tho York August Meoting — and netted for her owner £80,000 in bets. Her caroor, liowove-r, was n brief one. Thefßctwas Padwick ran her to death, and in tbe winter of 1854 it got abroad that Virago had turned roarer. Her last win was tho Post Stakes at Newmarket, in tho spring of 1855, when she beat Acrobat ; during the season, however, she ran well atAecofr, butmißerably bad at Goodwood. After that Virginia's daughter wan sold to Lord Stradbroko for £500, and was sent to the stud, but does not seem to have particularly distinguished herself in that line. Clever ,19 ho was, howover, Padwick was no more exempt from tho uncertainties of horseflesh than other tnon. Seldom was a nioro promising animal suen than St. Hubert ; everybody fancied him ; ha was heavily backed for the Two Thousand with 7 to ton, but ran second, to Lord of tho Isles. Tot his admirers still had faith in him, and piled their morcy on tbe good-looking brute at Goodwood, with the samo result. But, and it is not an unique c.iro ■with a succesnfnl turfite, Padivick was not a good judge of racing, nnd it was rather by tbo surrounding 1 ! of tho turf, and his consummnto skill in turning thorn to account, t'.inn by any fine judgmont immodately bearing upon the pursuit, that ho was successful. At tiaios he made egregious mistakes iv his appreciation of horses : he took a groat liking to a big ono called AlvrdUton, persistently backing him in defiance of bis trainer'fl opinion, whilo on tho other hand ho was equally obatinata in refusing to recognieo the merits of Joo Miller, who proved a vuluablo horse, aftor Padwick had sold

his shares in him, by winning the Chester Cup (with old Joo Goatnr up), against forty competitors, nncl tho Aecot Plate, for which he distanced VoltiKeur and Hobbie Noble. Such uiistalca would have ruined tho turf career of oomo men, but Henry Piidwick waa born under a lucky star. And no man know so well bow Hdvantagoously to dispose of n horso at the exact tirao whon hi« market value was at a preminm and bis intrinsic worth below par ; the Marquis of Hastings gave him £11,000 for Kangaroo, the highest sum ever paid for a threo-year-old. Tho horse had made a yreat sensation when ho beat tho Duke of Ueaufort'a Koenig and eighteen others for tho Newmarket Biennial in the Craven Meeting ; after which ho never took a race of tho vaino of £50, and started for tho Derby at 1000 lo It). Ho sold Oulston to Mr Elweß for £8000, nnd the unfortunate purchaser scored only one victory by the bargain, the Drawing-room Stakes at Goodwood ; while another of-his horses, Elmßthorpe, for which ho obtained £3000, died mad from brain diaeaso just afterwards. Thua ho renlised £22,000 by threo horaos who had just bliowu form enough to look valuable in the market, and never afterwards wero worth the oost of keeping.

Happy had. it been, perhaps, for the poor Marquis of Hustings if his connection with Henry Padwiok had be^un and ended with that first loas on Kangaroo. Bait their numes woro to become inextricably associated in one of the most famous turf scandals of the century ; It need scarcely bo added that wo alludo to tho scratching of Tho Earl. Although the affair wns pretty well elucidated even at tho time, thanks to thn xinflinching striiight-fonvardnoss of Admiral Rous, and every person was able to put his own construction upon it, it is still too near the time, and too raany aro still living whom the expose may concern, either directly or indirectly, for every particular <f tbnt curious transaction to ba brought to lij^lit. Tho Earl, which, as every onn knows, bulongad to the Marquiß of Hnstinge, und was generally considered to be the coming winner, was scratched at seven o'clock on the night before the Derby of 18(i8. Ynt a week afterwards ho won thn Grand .Prix with tho greatest ease. Public indignation was rampunt, and tho Admiral fiavo it votco by n letter to tho Times that fell lileo a thunderbolt upon more than one— upon John Day, when ho Baid that Lady Elizabeth had nover been able to gallop tho whole your, and that tho Marquis hid been put off with oxcusos and not allowed to sco her ; and upon Henry Padwick, when lio stated that Lord Hustings had boon shamefully deceived in regurd to theooratchingof The Earl, us ho Htoucl to win £35,000, and had nevor hedged. Tho lettor ended with, "Why did he scratch him 'i What can tho poor fly demand from tho sp'dor in whose web he i-s enveloped?" Everybody caniato tho conclusion that Pudnick wan tho spider ; and as, in another part of tho funiuuH Utter, tho Admiral assorted that the usurer was closeted with tho young nobleman while Hill who on his way to Messrs. Wcatherby's with the order for tho scratching in his pocket, nut even tho ilat contradiction which bin lordahip sent to The Times could dienbi'so tho public luiu.i that Haßtings was a mere puppet compolled (o dunce as Padwick choso to pull the strings. JohnDay commencod an action for libel, and " tho Spider" wroto a letter to tho leading journal, in which ho asserted that he acted entirely under tho Marquis's directions ; that he had even opposed tho scratching ; that he had no intercut or control over Tho Earl, or one penny on him. Down came tho old sea-lion on hiru again. "If yon had no interest in the howe why did he run under your name and colours iv the Biennial, and receive forfeit in tho mutch tin MrPadwic-k'x The Karl against Sco Saw '? And why woro all tho winnings, including tho Ascot swoopslakes paid to your account?" Upon which Padwick had to confess- that ho hail advanced tho Marquis a very largo loan, and Tho Karl was one of tho sccuritioa; butdeniod receiving tho winnings, ttsserting they had all boon paid over to his lordship's uccouut. Comment on buoli au. imbroglio is suuotiluous, tbe

Msrquiß was utterly ruined, and by lifting a finger Padwick could have atrippod the coat off his back ; he had been led to believe that Lady Elizabeth

would win the Derby, and sho might have dono so, but to again quota words imputed to Admiral Rous on tlio racecoiirso, "IE I had taken as much laudanum »s has boon given to that mare I should be a doad man." On the ! Friday afternoon bofore the Donoaater Tho Enrl was struck out of the St. Leger and of all other engagements for tho season, but it was conclusively shown this time that he had indeed gone wrong, Aud while tho strife was raging anew the poor young plunger lay dying. During those nineteen years, however, that his name had been so conspicuous in turf annals, Padwick had been wax. ing in wealth and sooial position ; ho had been appointed to a magistracy in his native county, and was afterwards made Deputy. Lieutenant ; in the latter position he might have been seen attending upon Prince Albert in full uniform at tho opening of the Great Exhibition of 1851. Though short of. stature, ho was a tolerably good-looking man, with an oily and suave manner about him that was extremely pleasant, until your 50 per cent, was not paid up— ho did obnrgo oven as much as £500 per cent. — then tho unsheathod claws of that velvet paw came down upon you — as a gentleman named Whioldon felt to hia cost. Having failed to meot his engagements with the usurer, and knowing what would be the consequenco, Wh\oldon bolted over to Prance, but not so socretly that his creditor was not forewarned and forearmed, for no sooner had tho fugitive arrived at Boulogne than bo was arresled, Padfrick having ostensibly sold the debt to a Frenchman. But every man has a weak place in his armour, aud Honry Padwick's weak plaeo was woman, lovely woman. Tho shrewdest and most matter-of-fact man upon overy other pomt — he believed himself to be an irresistible Don Giovanni, whose approach no female could withstand. Now, Mr Whicldon had, with his wife, a very pretty woman, been a frequent visitor at Hill-street, Borkclcy-Bquarc, to which Padwiok had now removed, and tho lady having discovered his little vanity, no Booner heard of her husband's arrest, than, rouderins: herself as fascinating as possible, she called upon the usurer, stating she iiad certain property, quite apart from her husband's on which she desired a mortgage. Heaven alone knows what interest' sho promised, or what security sho gave, but aho con« trived to bamboozle old Shylock out of a chequo for £8000. The syron had not long been gono when her dupe began to wake from tbo glamour she had cast around him, nnd sent off a messenger to atop tho cheque Too lato ! It had been paid. And it is rather gratifying to record that he never got a farthing of his monoy back. That was not the only time ho fell a victim to woman's wiles. On another oc:nsion a certain Duohoss called upon him with n sonied casket, which phc assured him contained £50,000 worth of diamonds', upon which sho requested an advance of £5000. Ttio fair visitor was so insinuating, and so ticliled tho usurer's vanity that, taking her word for tho contents, ho drew out a chequo for tho sum she required. Time pnasc il on, and as the lady was in no hurry to redeem her bond, he contrived to open tho bos, and found— not jewels, but brick-bats ! He was equal to the occasion, however, this timn. Ho reroto to inform hor ladyship that at any other time, aftor sho had redonmed tho pledge, sho could have double tho amount upon it ; the bait took, tho £5000 was paid, but when a few days tiftcrwnrdß the caßkot camo hack to him, the £10,000 was not. But he made amends for such, little checks by his dealings with certain ladies of the demimonde, whoso oxtravngaucies ho suppliod at usurious intorost, and who brought many a fly to his web, in the shape of rich young idiots, whom they bad got in their toils. The advance of a f'iw thousands would soon bB doubled and trebled by interest and expenses to a formidable sum ; then ho would|sell the victim a horse »t a very high price, or some land to wanted to bo rid of, and get tho title-deeds of an ancestral estate into hiß handa as a socurity. The yambling-lablo also helped to swell his incomo, for ho wasja great adept at enrda and dico, with which ho was usually fortunate. Yet when ho risked tho £80,000 he had won on Virago upon the Stock Exchange ho loot every farthing. But wo will baok Capel-court against aH tho black-legs in the world for skinning tho lamb.

Af tor the Marquis of Hastings" expose Padwick did not do very much upon tho turf, his health began to fail, Mb bon vivaiit propensities rendering htm n martyr to gout ; but though rolling in •wealth, his thirst for more kept him .constantly on tho rack, plunging him into all kinds of risky and gigantic speculations.' During his last years he Buft'ored greatly, until an attack of bronchitis, in tho autumn of 1880, brought to a cloro ono of tho most successful carcerß in tho annuls of usury and racing.

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Bibliographic details

A NOTABLE "TURFITE.", Hawke's Bay Herald, Volume XXIII, Issue 8033, 21 April 1888

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A NOTABLE "TURFITE." Hawke's Bay Herald, Volume XXIII, Issue 8033, 21 April 1888

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