Default

Default

Default

This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

MISS JENNIE LEE ON AUSTRALIA.

Misa Jennie Lee has been playing "Jo" about thirteen year,-. This talented littli lady, speaking of her trip 'through the colonies, says :— " I arrived ip Sydney ' Without having uiifde any arrangements with 'any of £he man'ageys. They heard from Auckland that I <yaa or+ thp Bteamer\ and it web rather jfnnny to gee them boih'd thp sh^p and pomoo'f) deck to nee if Miss J^e wou}d not p)ay with them. I went right to Melbourne, and opened ttiere at the Frincoss Theatre, under \ the management of Messrs Williamson, Garner, and Musgrove. I was the first star thnt the triumvirate ftad over p ayed. "Jo " was played for five months, which waa somethingumrecedented in Me)' - ourne, After that I returned to Sydney, and played there at tho Theatre Eoyal for three months. The engagement was a largo one, tho receipts frequently reaching £400 per night. After the comple-

lion of my season at Sydney I went to Tasmania, playing at Hobart on my ivay to Netv Zealand. I played in all the principal towns, and you will hardly believe I played in Dunedin for nine weeks in pieces in my repertoire. I visited Invercargill, Chrißtcliurch, Wellington, Auckland, and then back to Sydney, playing my engagements at the Opera House. From thencj to Adelaide for sis weeks, and then 03ain to Hobart and Melbourne. I found the Australian people the moat delightful in the world. Sooiety opeuß its doors wide to the respectable ntress who goes there, and nothing conld have been more hospitable and cordial tlmi was the treatment I received from 'he people. The Mar juis End Marchioness of Normanby, at Melboui le, Lord and Lady lortus, at Sydney, Sir George SUahn, of Tasman : i, ani Sir Wi 'iam and Lady Robinson, of South Ausii'alia, continually had me at Government House, apd I was welcomed everywhere, and treated with a kindner 3 1 shall never forget. I will, of course, return to the Antipodes. When I was leaving I was tendered a complimentary benefit, end at it I promised to return in three years, and I intend to keep my word. In England you uo not seem to care to see me In anything but ' Jo,' believing, as in (ha case of Josoph Jefferson, that I could only play in one p.' "t with which my name Wai more rwrticularly associated. In Australia t icy are wiling fid rendy to have me ): iy what I please, and will come to s< ■ me in whatever I do. If there is merit "i a pie3e, or in my rendering of it, I am given fi^l credit, which you must acknowledge is different here. And these Australians know something about acting. Genevieve Ward mude as great a success there witj ' Forget- me-not' as s.he did hero ; so did Ristori in her favourite characters; and, in fact, ("1 ar"a',s who have Buxaeeded here are almost certain to succeed there. They l ! ke my 'Jo ' just as much as you dii 1 , but they did not mako up their ra'-idi not to come and see me ill anything elf ;."

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item
Bibliographic details
Word Count
519

MISS JENNIE LEE ON AUSTRALIA. Hawkes Bay Herald, Volume XXII, Issue 7785, 2 July 1887, Supplement

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working