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GREAT BRITAIN.

xne united states minister, mr Phelps, was banqueted by the Lord Mayor of London on June 3rd. In | responding to the toast given in honor of the President of the United States, Mr Phelps assured his hearers of the pleasure with which Americans viewed the settlement of the questions at issae between England and Russia. The desperate condition of the Scotch land market is shown by the surprising number of estates now offered for sale in

Scotland. One auctioneer alone advertised to sell on June 2nd estates valued at £2,500,000. Many Americans ara.in the market looking for Scotch property. Lord Garmoyle, now Earl Cairns, took his seat in the House of Lords on June sth. The German despatch boat Pomerania seized a Yarmouth lighter on June 4th in the Worth Sea, and towed the vessel into Wilhelm's Haven, where she is detained on pretence that the lighter was fishing in prohibited waters. Bishop MCoberly announces his intention to resign the See of Salisbury this summer on account of age. He is now 82 years old. The London police were informed on June 15th that two dynamiters had arrived in England from the United States, and an active search for the parties was instituted. Letters on all conceivable subjects lately published in the English papers, and bearing John Ruskin's signature, are declared by his solicitors to be forgeries. The motive of the forger appears to have been pure mischief. A fire broke out at noon on June 3rd in tho Margaret pit of the Philadelphia colliery, near Durham, caused by an explosion, by which 22 men and boys were killed outright. The explosion was followed by a rush of water in immense volumes, and the whole mine was flooded, notwithstanding the moat strenuous efforts to prevent it. The British Missionary Society of London breakfasted the explorer Stanley on May 27th. Stanley is making his campaign in Europe on behalf of the Congo State very vigorously. A most encouraging feature of the agricultural outlook is the favorable change in the weather, which came towards the end of May at a most opportune time, and has continued since. Warmth and sunshine will produce the best results, especially as the change was preceded by copious rains. The backward condition of the crops and the discoloration of the wheat were a source of complaint', but it is now admitted that no lasting injury was done, and if the present fine weather continues a rapid improvement of the harvest prospects in England is expected. It is said that the Budget increase of duty on beer and spirits has been a blessing in disguise to many enterprising dealers, who have made fortunes by the exercise of a little forethought. Mr Gladstone, replying to an enquiry made by Mr M'Coan, the Home Eule member for Wicklow, said it was not the intention of the Government to establish regular diplomatic relations with, the Vatican. Mr John Bright has written a public letter approving the Parliamentary grant of £30,000 a year to the Princess Beatrice as a dowery. Mr Bright says he is astonished to see Liberals object to so small a grant while silent concerning the extravagance -of the Government over unjust wars. It is said that Cunningham, the dynamiter, has Bhown signs of insanity

since his connnemet in Chatham prison. Official reports ooncerning the India wheat crop indicate, if the present anticipations be realised, that there will be a smaller demand in England for American wheat this autumn than last year. An inspection of the boiler and engines of the Arctic steamer Alert, returned by tbe United States Government to the English Admiralty, showed them to be all salted up, and in a general rusty condition. The fact has been severely commented on by the Press. Lieut John Loomes Shook, assistant naval constructor to the United States navy, who was on special duty at the Royal College, Greenwich, England, committed suicide at Blackheath by shooting himself. The cause was disappointment in love. The British steamer Weaverley, with a cargo of spelter, was seized by the French in Chinese waters on the ground that her cargo was contraband of war. The committee of the London Chamber of Commerce have forwarded to the Government a resolution i,n favor of emigration to the British colonies, especially to Australia, where the consumption of British goods, exceeds £8 per head, instead of to America, where tbe consumption is only 10s per head. Sir Charles Dilke, while in Dublin on a visit to Earl Spencer, refused to attend an official breakfast given by Lord Mayor O'Connor on May 25th, on account of that official's insults to the Prince of Wales in inciting riots at ' Mallow and Cork daring the Royal visit. The purpose of Sir Charles Dilke being in Dublin was to consult with Earl Spencer regarding the Irish Crimes Act. ;:" The Pope had a two hours' conference ..with. the Irish Bishops at the. Vatican on' May 25th,' during which he lectured them strongly in regard to their ani- . mosity to England. Archbishop Croke returned to Dublin from Rome on June 3rd; He deprecated any political manifestations. Addresses were presented .to ;h'iinj;V;declaring • that he had.,.vindicated the "cause tof^the, lrish people at .'Rqme,,:>nd had fltqod firm; to the faith land tnjß.fatherland., . The Archbishop in 'reply} ladyised the ; Bigbers riot to, put ;^|iw^el^efin\th'^ < power.pf-s^ballea-ba<i / ' i 6rder.r i^Sacti, addressed as ;BEpvvipg(the unity of the priests aoid the was anxious td; ace 'this old

land restored to its pristine grand state, Orangeiam broken down, and all classes working loyally together. A fund is now being raised in Ireland for the benefit of J as. Stephens, formerly the Fenian head centre, and recently expelled from France. The fund already amounts to £7000. When the bill is introduced in Parliament, aa is proposed, to provide a royal residence in Ireland for Prince Victor of Wales it will be opposed by the Parnellites on the ground that Ireland has more thsn enough of vice-regal pageantry now in Earl Spencer's court at Dublin Oastle. THE DERBY... The Derby was run on June 3rd. The weather was brilliant, and the attendance on the downs enormous. Lord Hasting' bay colt Melton carried off the prize, Capt. C. Bowling's bay colt Paradox being second, and Mr Chad wick's Royal Hampton third. Fred Archer rode Melton, Webb rode Paradox, and Giles rode Royal Hamptom. Melton was the favorite in the betting. Just before the race 7 to 4 was offered against Melton and was freely taken, 6 to 1 Against Paradox, 5 to 1 against Xaintrailles, 6 to 1 against Crafton, 10 to 1 against Royal Hampton, 12 to 1 against Ringwood, and 20 to 1 against the 6eld, consisting of Choubra, Luminary, Red Ruin, Shecraton, EstraliDg and Lynette colt. A good start wa3 secured. Shecraton was first away, closely attended by Xaintrailles and Koyal Hampton. After three hundred yards' running Royal Hampton took a clear lead, followed by Shecraton, Crofton, Redruin, Xain(railles, Luminary, and Ringwood in the order named, all of whom were clear of Estraling, Choubra, Melton, and the Lynette colt, the latter being last. Passing the mile post Royal Hampton was still in first place, Shecraton half a length behind, with Red Ruin, Crafton and Luminary next, and Paradox at ther heels ; Estraling headed the remainder of the racers, of whom Ringwood and Melton were close up. At the top of the hill Eoyal Hampton again took a clear lead, and was followed in the order named by Red Ruin, Luminary, Crafton, Xaintrailles, Paradox, and Melton. Rounding Tottenham Corner Shecraton and Red Ruin joined Royal Hampton, all, however, being passed on entering the straight by Xaintrailles. At this point Royal Hampton fell away beaten, leaving Paradox on the lower ground ahead of Melton, the pair having the race entirely to themselves . At every stride Melton drew nearer to Paradox, and finally passed him, winning a most exciting race. Xaintrailles finished fourth, Crafton fifth, Shecraton sixth, Red Ruin seventh, Luminary eighth, and Estraling last. ' The attendance was considered unprecedented. Besides the Prince and

Pnncea9 of Wales and all their sobs and daughters, who came by special train, the Dukes of Edinburgh and. Cambridge and other royal personages were present. They were warmly greeted on their arrival. The jockey Archer, after his victory, was the recipient of an ovation. The message announcing the name of the winner was transmitted from London to New York in three seconds, about the quickest time yet made between the two cities. THE MANCHESTER CUP. The race for the Manchester Cup, of 2000 soys, added to a handicap sweepstakes of 25 soys each, was run on May 28th, and was won by Mr Jardine's colt Borneo, 4yrs. Mr Hungerford's 5 yr-old mare Xeraa came in second, and Mr T. Chalmers' 4yr-old colt Chromaboo .third. There were fifteen starters, including Mr Fred Gibhardt's aged bay horse Gole and Mr Craig's (formerly Mr J. It. Keene's) syr-old horse Blue Grass. At the start Blue Grass and Borneo made the running jointly, with Gole well up. When half the course had been covered Borneo assumed the lead, and retained it to the end, winning by a length despite a resolute challenge of Xema to gain first place. Chromaboo finished four lengths behind Xema. Blue Grass and Gole were eased up, and came in ninth and tenth respectively. THE WHITSUNTIDE MEETINGS. At the meeting on May 27th the Whitsuntide Plate, of 3000 soys, for 2-yr-olds, was won by Mr Peck's bay filly Philosopher. The Epsom Grand Prize for 3-yr-olds was run on June 4th. Mr E. Wright's bay colt Bird of Freedom won, with the Duke of Beaufort's colt Pepper and Salt next, and Mr R. Howell's colt Barnacle third. There were six starters. The race for the Oaks Stakes was won by Lord Oadogan'B bay filly Lonely. The winner was ridden by Fred Archer. Lord Zetland's bay filly St. Helena was second, and Sir J. Willoughby's filly Cipillina third.

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Bibliographic details

GREAT BRITAIN., Hawke's Bay Herald, Volume XXII, Issue 7201, 29 June 1885

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1,658

GREAT BRITAIN. Hawke's Bay Herald, Volume XXII, Issue 7201, 29 June 1885

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