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SAN FRANCISCO MAIL

GREAT BRITAIN. The race for the Derby on May 28th resulted in a dead heat between St. Gatien and Harvester. Sir John Wil-

loushby's filly Queen Adelaide came in third. The other starters were St. Medard, Loch Ranza, Waterford, Bedouin, Richmond, Beauchamp, Borneo, Condor, The Hopeful Dutchman, Talisman, Breßt, and Woodstock. There was an excellent start. After three strides

Richmond assumed a slight lead. After a quarter of a mile had been covered Woodstock took up the running, Richmond second. They went through the

furze in front of Bedouin to the mile post, where Bichmond again took command. They ran thus to the top of the hill. Going dotffiV the hill Borneo assumed the lead, followsd'by St. Gatien and Richmond. Entering" «hfc straight Loch Ranza joined Borntfty Queen Adelaide and Harvester close up. When the quarter of a mile from home was reached Borneo was still leading, f ol-

lowed by St. Gatien. The leaders continued in these positions to the distance post, where Borneo was beaten. St. Gatien was here joined by Harvester, and a tremendous race home took place, the pair running locked together, Queen Adelaide third, Waterford fourth ; Brest, Talisman, Borneo, and St. Medard following in the order named. Richmond was ninth to the cross line, Woodstock and The Hopeful Dutchman last. The race was not run off. The stakes were divided between the owners of St. Gatien and Harvester. The time was 2min

46aec. It; has "transpired that the real owner of St. Gatien is a builder at Epsom, and an intimate friend of Fred Archer, the jockey who rode St. Medard. The popular belief among sporting men is that Harvester was never ill as was reported, and that the circulation of the report to that effect was merely a trick to rig the market and obtain long odds. When Harvester appeared on the track his perfect soundness was so patent to all beholders that he waa very heavily backed, and large sums of money must have been landed by his owners and backers. It is probable, however, that Sir John Willoughby will have some awkward questions to answer about the alleged trickery in the reports as to his horse's condition, and also about the pulling by the jockey Webb of Queen Adelaide, who would undoubtedly have won had Bhe been allowed to do so. Walton, the American " plunger," has been badly smashed by the defeat of Richmond. An objection has been lodged against St. G-atien on the ground that the description of his pedigree is deficient. Rover, his sire, was purchased at a ridiculously low price ; now £2000 is offered for him. The bay filly Busybody won the three-year-old Fillies' Race (The Oaks) on May 30th. After several false starts all the horses were got off on fairly even terms. Queen Adelaide led for 200 yards, when Kinfawns took a slight lead, Wildnhot and Superba right behind. A.t the furze Pinta and Legacy passed Kinfawns, Quilt fourth, Queen Adelaide and Wildshot next. At the mile post Wildshot took third place, with Busybody close behind. Rounding Tottenham corner Busybody drew to the front, Queen Adelaide and Superba following. After Busybody had shaken Queen Adelaide off the former was challenged by Superba, but Busy- j body always had the best of the struggle. Wildahot came in fourth, Quilt and Kinfawns next, while Penta finished last. Busybody won by half a length, Superba a length before Queen Adelaide. The weather was delightful, and there was a large and fashionable attendance. The Earl of Aylesfnrd got into trouble with an employe of the course on the Derby day, and was thrown heavily to the ground and had his leg broken in two places. The Manchester Cup was won on June sth by Mr Hammond's filly Florence, Mr Newburgh's colt Bobertson second, and Mr Manton's mare Corrio Roy third. There were eighteen starters. A tremendous explosion of dynamite occurred outside the detective office, Sootlaud-yard, London, at 9.30 on the evening of May 30. The corner of the building, which was composed of thick brickwork, was blown off to a height of 30 fee't;i.taking with it a portion of the side walls, and revealing an aperture 15 feet wide. A brougham that was standing opposite in front of the office was wrecked and the coachman injured. A policeman was blown across the yard against the wall, and severely injured. So far as is known thirteen persons were injured, including five women, and several will die from

their wounds. The explosive appears to have been placed in a pipe let into a wall at the rear of the large building occupied by the detectives. A canister of unexploded dynamite was afterwards found in the yard. The individual who lighted the fuse in St. James-square was pursued by an indignant and excited crowd, but managed to make his escape by jumping into a cab which had been in readiness, and which waß lost sight of in the darkness of the night and the great confusion that prevailed. Sixteen packages of dynamite with fuse attached were also found at 10.30 the same night under the Nelson monument in Trafalgar-square. An hour before the explosion there was an outbreak of fire at the War Office, supposed to have been incendiarism. It was speedily extinguished. The explosion in the Junior Carlton Club created great havoc. The club-house remained closed for several days. A crowd of excited people visited the scene of the explosion, and the police were drawn up in line to prevent the access of the multitude. At the St James's Theatre, 100 yards distant, the explosion sounded like two claps of thunder. The audience became alarmed, ladies fainted, and a panic ensued. The second bomb in St. Jaraes'square exploded against the residence of Sir Walker Wynn, and produced a large, wide fracture, 4 feet in height. Three breadths of windows were smashed-and the furniture damaged. The appointment of " Vigilance Committees," on the Western American plan, has been seriously discussed in hitherto Conservative quarters. Extra guards were placed around Mr Gladstone's residence. The St. James' Gazette of June Ist describes the outrages to Mr Gladstone's " recognition of explosions as a political force. " The Pall Mall Gazette advocates the immediate formation of a dynamite assurance company, to insure people against the steadily growing class of casualties introduced by the Irish malcontents ; the rate of the premium to be threepence per £100. Mr A. M. Sullivan is loud in his denunciation of dynamiters. He says " Ireland has no enemies bo bad as those Irishmen who commit these outrages." The Conservative Press, and Conservative public men generally, say that this revival of the policy of murder is an act of intimidation designed to coerce the House of Lords into passing the Franchise Bill. The Liberals believe the explosions to have been the work of Irißh Extremists, who hope thereby to disgust the English well-wishers of Ireland and discredit the Irish leaders in Parliament by showing that they cannot control and do not even know the plans and movements of their own countrymen, and thus bring about an open warfare between England and Ireland. The organisation of a society is proposed in Great Britain to procure laws to compel the cultivation of all lands suit- , able for agriculture and unnecessarily withheld from tillage, for the purpose of " making Great Britain more nearly selfsustaining and less dependent upon American and other foreign markets for cereals, fruits, and vegetables." The movement is aimed chiefly against the immense preserves for deer, grouse, partridges, and pheasants in Perthshire, Argyleshire, and Jnvernessßhire, in Scot'

lami ; and in Yorkshire, and all over the ■wes\ L - coast of England. Tl >c American millionaire Vandertoilt was in London on May 24th. It is said that he left New York to avoid a coil about the financial craah in WaU- street, and tlie failure of ex-President Graait'a bank.

It wa a reported on May 26th that sd lallpox was alarmingly prevalent in various parts of Xondon. Mr Da'vitt denies the statement imade concerning him by the President of the American-Irish National League. He declares he joined the League on condilnon that he would be allowed to advocate the principle of a national proprietary, smd that Parnell accepted it. Mr Parnell has sent a formal letter of thanks to the American Land League for its liberal contributions to the " cause " in Ireland, particularly to meet the election expenses of Irish members.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/HBH18840701.2.16

Bibliographic details

SAN FRANCISCO MAIL, Hawke's Bay Herald, Volume XXI, Issue 6899, 1 July 1884

Word Count
1,405

SAN FRANCISCO MAIL Hawke's Bay Herald, Volume XXI, Issue 6899, 1 July 1884

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